4.3 Stars Out Of 5
    4.3 out of 5
    (16)
    (11)
    (2)
    (2)
    (0)
    Quality:
    4.5 out Of 5
    (4.5 out of 5)
    Value:
    4.5 out Of 5
    (4.5 out of 5)
    Meets Expectations:
    4.2 out Of 5
    (4.2 out of 5)
    90%
    of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
    SORT BY:
    SEE:
    Displaying items 1-5 of 31
    Page 1 of 7 12345 Next |Last
    1. Arden, NC
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      4 Stars Out Of 5
      Essays read like a warm talk with a good friend
      November 5, 2017
      ADFehl
      Arden, NC
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      Quality: 4
      Value: 5
      Meets Expectations: 4
      In this collection of essays, the title inspired by a portion from Dr. Seuss' The Places You Will Go, newspaper columnist Eileen Button takes us into the daily routine of her hectic life and shows up where she found the beauty in the chaos. It took work and dedication, moments of forcing herself to stop and be still, but over time she came to learn how to work past her daily life gripes and see the gifts in the small moments.

      "The Waiting Place is for people like me who get stuck in their precious, mundane, gorgeous, absurd lives. It is for those who work hard at the "business of living" only to find that they seem to be caught in one long, boring meeting...It's for those who wake up one day and find themselves repeatedly sighing and thinking 'This is so not the life I dreamed of living.' It's also for those who wonder what is worse: to remain in the day-in, day-out lives they have created or to risk it all and make a change, even if that change results in falling on their faces. The waiting place is never cozy. In fact, when we find ourselves there, most of us try like heck to escape...The following essays breathe life into common (and not so common) waiting places. I hope you find yourself in these pages and conclude, as I have, that some of the most priceless gifts can be discovered while waiting for something else." ~ from Chapter 1

      Her essays cover pivotal moments throughout her life where epiphanies slipped in under the mundane. Sometimes it wasn't right in the moment, but years later as she reflected on cherished memories. Some of the highlights: reminiscing about fishing trips as a little girl with her father; comical wedding mishaps (that were likely not so comical in the moment lol); recalling the beauty in her grandmother's hands , seeing all the life lived that showed there during family Scrabble games; revisiting her childhood home as an adult and the emotions that stirred up, turning that glass doorknob and taking in the hush of the place. Eileen also recalls lectures her grandmother would give her about her nail-biting habit, something my own grandmother rides me about to this day!

      Eileen also discusses the struggle that comes with sometimes being defined by your spouse's occupation, in her case being the wife of a Methodist pastor. She defines various doubts and fears that unexpectedly came along with the position of a pastor's wife as well as the he pressures and expectations that your congregation can put on you. Button reveals that she often feels she has a "dysfunctional, co-dependent" relationship with the church.

      Additionally, there's the strain of trying to figure out what to do, how to make things work when the household income barely covers the monthly bills (Button recalls the day she swallowed her pride and applied for WIC).

      "I reach for my daily stack of mail. Today's includes a Rite-Aid weekly flyer, the water bill, and a credit card offer that features three crosses and the message "Jesus Loves You" on the card. The credit card company writes, "Express your faith with every purchase!" There is something deeply wrong with a world in which you can own a credit card with a full color picture of Christ's object of torture printed on it."

      She describes added emotional fatigue worrying over her youngest son, who was born with a condition where the upper and lower portions of the esophagus didn't connect. Speaking of her children, one thing I noticed that I found a little disappointing is how she seems to take pride in fixing meals over playing with her children. I mean, yes, it is definitely admirable that she takes the time to make nourishing meals for them, I was just a little surprised when one essay illustrates how one day her kids genuinely seemed shocked when she finally, grudgingly agrees to fly a kite with them. But it is in this moment that she has one of her revelations which she can now share with readers -- why honest presence is so important to her children!

      This collection also touches upon the topic of depression. Button shares moments where she deeply hurt for loved ones who had fallen into immense emotional darkness and her inner aggravation at feeling helpless to save them. Here again, she shares the calming takeaways she eventually came to realize are born in life's harder moments. For readers reaching for this book at a time when they find themselves saying, "This is not the life I signed up for," she offers this to marinate on: "To live is to wait. It's how we wait that makes all the difference." Hang in there long enough, you'll find your way to the brass ring.

      As a whole, these essays are so enjoyable largely because Button writes in the tone of a good friend who speaks in soft tones but still makes it clear she's been through the wringer in her day and, at least on some level, knows of what she speaks. It's also a kick to see her East Coast upbringing infused into her wording: "wicked dark' "wicked ugly". Her humor balances the heavier bits and I give her bonus points for working in a "Come On Eileen", a nod to my favorite 80s song :-D
    2. 3 Stars Out Of 5
      The Waiting Place by Eileen Button
      September 23, 2011
      blackballo0n
      Quality: 4
      Value: 4
      Meets Expectations: 3
      The Waiting Place is a series of short essays written from the point of view of the author (a mother, a columnist and a pastor's wife). In this book, Eileen gives us glimpses into various points of her rather complicated life.

      To be honest, I was a little disappointed because I expected the book to be more about finding God in these "waiting places." However, once I got over that fact, I found myself appreciating the author's sharings, especially in the latter part of the book.

      Overall, The Waiting Place is written in an intimate yet entertaining manner, making it a refreshing and light read.

      ---

      I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of BookSneeze, a book review bloggers program. Find out more at BookSneeze.com! :)
    3. Prague, Czech republic
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      4 Stars Out Of 5
      I expect more, but it´s not so bad
      August 20, 2011
      Monika Vlckova
      Prague, Czech republic
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      Quality: 4
      Value: 4
      Meets Expectations: 3
      This book I chose just because I´m very impatient person and the idea of long waiting is very frustrating for me. This book is full of short stories from author´s life, where she describes various forms of waiting. Waiting for next move in scrabble game, waiting for fishing with her dad, waiting for engagement or waiting for a death.. It a book of very nice stories full of tender memories for her loved ones.

      And what can I say about this book? It´s a nice and easy reading for sure, which I can reccomend to you. Essays are short and easy. Stories are sometimes happy, sometimes romantic and sometimes flavored with sadness. Offend anyone but for me personally not excite. It´s a nice reading, but probably I will not pick this book again. But I don´t want to reject it. I think, everybody needs to have a right mood for take this book, delving into his chair with a cup of hot chocolate and started to read. One need only wait :-)
    4. AZ
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      4 Stars Out Of 5
      The Waiting Place
      August 14, 2011
      Mommy of three
      AZ
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: female
      Quality: 4
      Value: 4
      Meets Expectations: 4
      The Waiting Place is a collection of essays of Eileen Button's life. The theme that is carried throughout her memoir is the waiting place or what she calls life's little delays and opportunities that she uses to trust God. Her book has the traits of an insightful and intelligent woman with an added humor and spunk that will have you laughing as she shares her life experiences.

      I love the way she is so transparent and honest with her readers, in one way or the other you will see yourself in the author's shoes. We all experience the waiting place in our life and this book will encourage you to trust God through your trials.
    5. Hahira, GA
      Age: 35-44
      Gender: female
      4 Stars Out Of 5
      A book full of candid, heartwarming reflection.
      August 2, 2011
      E Austin
      Hahira, GA
      Age: 35-44
      Gender: female
      Quality: 5
      Value: 5
      Meets Expectations: 4
      The Waiting Place__

      "Through it all, I'll peer into the waiting place's dingy corners, and hunt for treasures beneath the grime."

      I just completed a thought provoking and reflective book by Eileen Button about embracing through faith all the periods of waiting that permeate our lives here on Earth. She takes you on a journey through various milestone markers in her life, from childhood to being in her 40s that highlight very different kinds of waiting places she has had to experience. She provides feelings, reflections and valuable insights she has gained through these times of waiting. She also expresses how her faith in God has carried her through these waiting places, providing meaning and value to the circumstances and an ability to persevere and grow in her wisdom and understanding of Him.

      We all have waiting places in our lives, those times when we just feel like we are caught between where we are and where we want to be, or when we are not sure of God's direction, or we just don't know what he has planned for us next. Because waiting places are common to us all, it helps to relate to the author as she opens her heart to us, and shares with us the joys and sorrows, tears and laughter that have made up her waiting places. It took me a little while to make a connection with the author, but as her story continued, my interest increased. I began to feel her happiness, her excitement, her enthusiasm or her disappointment, her fatigue, her pain. I was amused at times, and I shed some tears at times. I recommend this book to anyone looking for something a bit different yet heartwarming.
    Displaying items 1-5 of 31
    Page 1 of 7 12345 Next |Last