Urban Legends of the New Testament: 40 Common Misconceptions
Buy Item $7.49 Retail: $14.99 Save 50% ($7.50)
In Stock
Stock No: WW680123
B&H Academic / 2015 / Paperback
Quantity:

Add To Cart


Add To Wishlist
eBook $9.99 View Details
Quantity:


Add To Cart


Wishlist

Urban Legends of the New Testament: 40 Common Misconceptions

B&H Academic / 2015 / Paperback

Buy 36 or more for $7.12 each.
In Stock
Stock No: WW680123


  • Other Formats (2)
Other Formats (2)
Description
Availability
Price
Add
Include
  1. In Stock
    $9.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $9.99
  2. In Stock
    $7.49
    Retail: $14.99
    Add To Cart
    $7.49

Product Media

Product Description

* A fresh look at 40 commonly misunderstood New Testament passages. Avoiding misinterpretations and incorrect translations of ancient Greek, Croteau offers a brief explanation of each text and then carefully clarifies its historical, cultural, and literary context. Discover the truth about the events surrounding Jesus's birth, his occupation, hell's location, and more. 288 pages, softcover from B&H.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 288
Vendor: B&H Academic
Publication Date: 2015
Dimensions: 9 X 6 X .7 (inches)
ISBN: 1433680122
ISBN-13: 9781433680120

Related Products

  1. Learn to Read New Testament Greek Workbook: Supplemental Exercises for Greek Grammar Students
    Learn to Read New Testament Greek Workbook: Supplemental Exercises for Greek Grammar Students
    David Croteau, Ben Gutierrez, Cara L. Murphy
    B&H Books / 2009 / Trade Paperback
    $20.99 Retail: $28.99 Save 28% ($8.00)
    2.5 Stars Out Of 5 3 Reviews
  2. Which Bible Translation Should I Use?: A Comparison of 4 Major Recent Versions
    Which Bible Translation Should I Use?: A Comparison of 4 Major Recent Versions
    Andreas Kostenberger, David A. Croteau
    B&H Academic / 2012 / Trade Paperback
    $10.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 27% ($4.00)
    5 Stars Out Of 5 2 Reviews
  3. Perspectives on Tithing: 4 Views
    Perspectives on Tithing: 4 Views
    David A. Croteau
    B&H Academic / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $14.99 Retail: $24.99 Save 40% ($10.00)

Publisher's Description

Urban Legends of the New Testament surveys forty of the most commonly misinterpreted passages in the New Testament. These "urban legends" often arise because interpreters neglect a passage’s context, misuse historical background information, or misunderstand the Greek language. For each New Testament text, professor David Croteau describes the popular, incorrect interpretation and then carefully interprets the passage within its literary and historical context. Careful attention is given to sound principles of biblical interpretation to guide readers through the process and reach a more accurate understanding of each text’s meaning. QR codes have been inserted at various points throughout the book. By scanning the code with your mobile device, you can view a video of David Croteau addressing a specific urban legend.
 
With examples from the Gospels, Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation, Urban Legends of the New Testament will not only help readers avoid missteps in these forty texts but also provide a model for engaging in correct interpretation of other New Testament passages.

Author Bio

David A. Croteau (Ph.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament and Greek in the Seminary and School of Ministry at Columbia International University. He is co-editor (with Andreas J. Köstenberger) of Which Bible Translation Should I Use? (B&H Academic, 2013) and author of Tithing after the Cross (Energion, 2013).

Product Reviews

4.2 Stars Out Of 5
4.2 out of 5
(4)
(0)
(1)
(1)
(0)
Quality:
4.3 out Of 5
(4.3 out of 5)
Value:
4.2 out Of 5
(4.2 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.2 out Of 5
(4.2 out of 5)
83%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
SORT BY:
SEE:
Displaying items 1-5 of 6
Page 1 of 2 12 Next
  1. theChristianReviewer
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    An excellent read on taking the Scriptures in the correct context!
    December 4, 2017
    theChristianReviewer
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    So the key take away for me in this book can be easily summarized by saying that it is imperative for Christians to read and study the Bible in context on their own and not just take what someone is saying as being the truth. I have seen many times where you hear someone speak on a topic and they sound authoritative on the subject, but in reality they may be just passing down something they have heard once before without the due diligence of checking into it themselves.

    Urban Legends of the New Testament: 40 Common Misconceptions is written very well and provides an interesting look into some common misconceptions that people have about the Scriptures. I would say that a majority of these misconceptions I have heard before - only a handful that I have not heard of previously.

    The author does a nice job with each of the 40 topics by first explaining the legend in a way to present it as if he actually believes the legend. Giving the reader an interpretation in a presentation that they may have heard it in before. Then the author provides his interpretation in an attempt to prove the invalidity of the legend. Finally, he provides an application of what he feels is the correct interpretation that the reader can apply to their daily lives.

    He categorizes these legends into one of two basic categories. First, we have some legends that can be traced as to the history of the legend, but not having details as to why the incorrect legend was started. Kind of a non-provable legend if you will. The second category of legends is one where it has some partial truth to it, but it does not tell the entire story. In my opinion, one of the more common types of these legends would be when someone takes Scripture out of context to force some meaning into a Scripture that doesn't belong.

    This book is a very interesting read and very well written. Please keep in mind that the author very strongly does not want people to use this information "as a sledgehammer upon hearing someone preach one of these legends" as he states in the Prologue of the book. Rather, he provides guidance in his Epilogue on how we should be gracious and non-judgmental toward people if we hear them speaking of the urban legends as though they were truth.

    The goal of this book is to provide help to the reader to avoid falling into the trap of some of these legends, but more importantly the author's desire is motivate his readers to pay more attention to the context when reading or studying the Bible. I feel that the author did a very good job of doing just that.

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
  2. Fitzysmom
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Review from Rambles of a SAHM
    April 11, 2016
    Fitzysmom
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Urban Legends of the New Testament is absolutely fascinating and left me feeling quite sheepish. Before reading this book if you would have asked me if I thought I knew my Bible well I would have pretty confidently said yes. I've been to Bible College and sat through class after class learning a hermeneutical approach to understanding the text.

    The very first urban legend bowled me over. The title of the chapter is There Was No Room at the Inn and it covers the Scriptures from Luke 2:1-7. A very familiar passage. So familiar in fact that I would hazard a guess that most of us can recite it from memory. After reading Croteau's chapter on it I have to laugh at not only my preconceptions but also those of the vast majority. As a credit to him I can honestly say that I will never again read that portion of Scripture in the same way.

    The second urban legend was entitled We Three Kings of Orient Are. By the end of the chapter I was cheering because I actually already knew the misconceptions. A big thanks goes out to Dr. Sherman for that one! Of course I didn't have long before I was once again astounded at my lack of understanding. But sure enough when I compared Croteau's notes with Scripture it came out just the way he said it would.

    This book is designed to be a pseudo text book, but I'm here to tell you that it doesn't read like one. It is quite reader friendly and I think that anyone who reads their Bible would enjoy reading this book as well. Croteau has a way of presenting complicated scenarios and facts so that even the non Bible student can grasp and retain. In fact his whole approach is one of discovery rather than shaming for not knowing in the first place. It's a very refreshing way of teaching.

    I wholeheartedly recommend this book to any Christian whether a lay-person or a church staff member. Even if you know each of the forty passages and completely understand their meaning I am sure you will be able to take away some nuggets that will enhance your walk with Christ.

    I received a copy of this book to facilitate my review.
  3. Charis
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Easy to read, quick reference
    January 14, 2016
    Charis
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    In our day and age wikipedia or google can justify any biblical "fact". This book helps dispel some wildly accepted myths in strong arguments, sound hermenuetics, and reliable historical context.
  4. John M Kight
    Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Helpful, Engaging, and Insightful.
    September 26, 2015
    John M Kight
    Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    David Croteau is the professor of New Testament & Greek at Columbia International University. Croteau holds a Th.M. and Ph.D. from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the editor and contributor to a number of books, including You Mean I dont have to Tithe? A Biblical and Theological Analysis of Tithing (Wipf & Stock, 2010), Perspectives on Tithing (B&H Academic, 2011), and Which Bible Translation Should I Use? Leading Experts Discuss 4 Major Versions (B&H Academic, 2012). Croteau has also published several articles in Bulletin of Biblical Research and Masters Seminary Journal. Most recently, Croteau rattles cages with the release of a challenging and yet helpful volume, Urban Legends of the New Testament: 40 Common Misconceptions (B&H Academic, 2015).

    In Urban Legends of the New Testament, Croteau seeks to deconstruct 40 interpretive myths, or urban legends, encountered in the New Testament text. An urban legend, according to Croteau, is a commonly circulated myth, repeated throughout the culture as common knowledge, but which isnt true (p. xiii). Croteau continues, interpretations of certain passages in the New Testament have fallen victim to this. Somehow something false is stated, and it gets heard and passed down without someone checking all the facts (p. xiii). Today many such urban legends exists within both the pulpit and the pews, and continue to be circulated without hesitation. It is here that Croteau embodies a clear voice of reason as he calls the reader to set aside tradition for the sake of exegesis and interpretation.

    Urban Legends of the New Testament tackles a number of well-known urban legends. But, Croteau also addresses some that may be less familiar to the average reader. For example, some of the urban legends include, the Eye of a Needle being a gate in Jerusalem (pp. 6166) and Hell being a reference to a First-Century garbage dump near Jerusalem (pp. 4954). Each chapter is titled after the urban legend itself, not the correct interpretation of the text(s) at hand(p. xiv), followed by a brief explanation. Subsequently, Croteau deconstructs each of the legends and provides a positive exegesis for his understanding of the correct interpretation. Finally, Croteau concludes each chapter with a section devoted to the application of his presentation, as well as an annotated bibliography divided by resource type (i.e. books, journals, websites, etc.) for further study.

    Personally I found Croteau to be both a model of integrity and a true exemplar of compassion in his handling of each of the 40 urban legends. He is engaging and consistent across the board in his treatment of these misunderstanding, and his tone is truly something to be admired. I also found the application section to be extremely helpful in processing the specific legends, especially for the pastor or teacher who would take on the responsibility of exposing such myths. Still, the reader must be fully prepared for the possibility of a challenge when picking up this book, because Urban Legends of the New Testament is sure to expose the presence of some urban legends in their own thought. Of course, if this breaks down the wall of bad hermeneutic and re-shapes a more faithful understanding of the text, who could be opposed to such challenge? In the end, if you still find yourself at ends with Croteaus conclusion, I am confident that you will still walk away encouraged by the carefulness he exemplifies as he handles the biblical text. This book comes highly recommended!
  5. Michael Kramarczyk
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    Not much to write home about......
    August 7, 2015
    Michael Kramarczyk
    Quality: 1
    Value: 1
    Meets Expectations: 1
    This book could be summed up with one word.....CONTEXT. This is repeated constantly, and rightfully so, with all the moral relativism going on in the church now. However, the constant harping to the Greek definitions is tiring. That's what a dictionary is for. Recommending a noxious amount of Bible translations also doesn't help. (See the prior sentence) Instead of clarifying a situation it just muddies the water. Not worth the money!
Displaying items 1-5 of 6
Page 1 of 2 12 Next

Ask a Question

Find Related Products

Author/Artist Review

Back
×

Ask a Question

What would you like to know about this product? Please enter your name, your email and your question regarding the product in the fields below, and we'll answer you in the next 24-48 hours.

If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.