Mark Through Old Testament Eyes: A Background and Application Commentary
Mark Through Old Testament Eyes: A Background and Application Commentary  -     By: Andrew T. Le Peau
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Mark Through Old Testament Eyes: A Background and Application Commentary

Kregel Academic / 2017 / Paperback

In Stock
Stock No: WW44411X


Product Description

Through Old Testament Eyes is a new kind of commentary series that opens the New Testament writings in greater depth to anyone committed to understanding or teaching Scripture. In this inaugural volume, the richness of Old Testament allusions and background in Mark clarifies puzzling passages and explains others in fresh ways.

The exodus motif structures Mark. Mark also presents Jesus as the true temple of God in contrast to the existing temple, which has been corrupted. These important themes are hidden to modern eyes without the insight of an Old Testament perspective, and this commentary builds on that insight to emphasize how the gospel applies to the daily lives of Christians today.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 384
Vendor: Kregel Academic
Publication Date: 2017
Dimensions: 9 X 6.00 (inches)
ISBN: 082544411X
ISBN-13: 9780825444111
Series: Through Old Testament Eyes

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  1. rustymodem
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Hitchhiking Through Mark
    December 28, 2017
    rustymodem
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This is a review of Mark Through Old Testament Eyes. The author is Andrew T. Le Peau. I had never heard of him but two things caught my attention.

    1) He has taught the book of Mark for over 10 years at InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.

    2) The offer of reading intertextually, seeing how the Old Testament can illuminate the New Testament.

    I can best describe my experience reading this book with a couple of analogies.

    1) Hitchhiking. While traveling dependent upon the goodwill of fellow travelers you are sometimes stuck in places where there has been little traffic. In these places previous hitchhikers inscribe their thoughts and ponderings on the backside of street signs. These texts tell you if you should wait or push off on foot. They give you a sense of not being alone, others have traveled this way before.

    2) Postcards. Everyplace I have visited I like to pick up postcards. They remind me of my visit and they are images I can share with others who have not been to those places.

    The book is not technical and not quite devotional. It is a guide for learning and teaching Marks Gospel. More of a map with multiple points of interest noted nicely in tables and sidebars. I knew I was traveling in Mark but I didn't know there was so much to see along the way.

    The notes the author has built into this commentary are informative and refreshing. You will go through the Gospel verse by verse for the most part. The brilliance of this author is the way he uses the many iterations of his teaching to pass on to the reader a rich experience. It shows. He points out Old Testament references a lot. Some of them I really appreciated, some of them I still need to ponder. All of them are worthwhile. You wont feel like you've wasted your time with this book. Le Peau pays attention to the structure and passes on his insights. I found this really refreshing.

    His bibliography is four and a half pages. Names with more than one entry are Kenneth Bailey, G. K. Beal, Craig Blomberg, Walter Bruggemann, R T France, John Gondingay, Richard Hays, Derek Kidner, Temper Longman, Alec Motyer, Rodney Stark, Mark Strauss, Willard Swartley John Walton, Christopher Writght, and N. T. Wright. As you can see the author has done his homework. My thanks and appreciation to Kregel Academic for providing me with a copy of this book for an unbiased review.

    I recommend this work to students, teachers, pastors or anyone wishing to study/travel through Mark. The author, Andrew T. Le Peau, is an excellent teacher/guide. I look forward to future volumes in this series. Like postcards they will be worth collecting and showing to others who wish to travel this journey.

  2. sheep23
    St. Charles, MO
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Mark in line with Old Testament
    December 27, 2017
    sheep23
    St. Charles, MO
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This new series by Kregel Academic called Through Old Testament Eyes is a quite unique commentary design. This volume by Andrew T. Le Peau, former longtime associate publisher for InterVarsity Press, on Mark's Gospel is a welcome addition to the many good commentaries on Mark. The contribution that Andrew's commentary makes to many valuable resources is his running commentary on how the individual verses and larger units of Mark cohere with the story of Israel in the Old Testament Scriptures. Not just outlining the historical and geographical markers that coincide with the ministry of Jesus, but how the OT shapes Mark's entire narrative.

    In the interaction with Jesus and Jairus' daughter in Mark 5, we Jesus responding to the ruler of the synagogue saying, "Do nor fear, only believe." Le Peau writes, "The exhortation to not be afraid is often associated with the them of the Divine Warrior, that God will fight for Israel ...the Old Testament emphasis on God as Divine Warrior is that Israel is to rely on God instead of their own devices." (111) This kind of interaction with the larger themes of the OT and fear are not what I would have thought of, but the application of this concept and its truth are true for this story and for God's people today.

    Further, there are certain echoes of OT stories that come in Mark's gospel that Andrew brings to the reader's attention. In Mark 6:40, at the verse which states, "So they sat down in groups of hundreds and fifties," at the feeding of 500, Andrew notes, "This arrangement connect Jesus to the New Exodus, being reminiscent of how Moses organized the people of Israel and delegated responsibilites (Ex. 18:20-22)." (123) The focus on patterns or ways in which Israel was gathered and how the crowds gathered in Jesus' ministry reflect not only Jesus as prophet but also point to his kingship, that he would rule people with justice, not wanting those in his midst to go hungry but have enough to eat to sustain their lives. The echoes of Moses here reiterate the truth that Jesus is part of a story that started well before his incarnation on Earth and will continue well after his ascension.

    The gray sections in the book are for areas in which Andrew wants to go deeper with theological and cultural issues that arise in the text. Concerning divorce and remarriage, Andrew seeks to bridge the gap between the Mosaic injunctions and the teaching of Jesus. He writes, "...if a man essentially abandoned his wife by not providing "her food, clothing, and marital rights...she is to go free" (Ex. 21:10-11). The purpose of this was to protect women and children from poverty and starvation. In that society, women had very few options for survival if they weren't married." (177) This kind of cultural and biblical analysis, even mentioning that we build a case for divorce and remarriage not just on one verse, gives us confidence when we go to apply the Bible to specific issues.

    I really enjoyed reading this book and know that it will be a most useful tool when studying Mark again.

    Thanks to Kregel Academic for the copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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  3. The Geeky Calvinist
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    A Great New Series
    December 26, 2017
    The Geeky Calvinist
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Every so often there comes a Commentary series that shatters the mold of the establishment. Through Old Testament Eyes is a new Commentary series produced by Kregel academic which focuses on historical background and application. This series is not groundbreaking in the sense that it is a scholarly commentary which is pushing the grounds of critical scholarship, nor is it an emotional commentary which pushes the sounds of evangelicalism. Rather this Commentary series is groundbreaking for its focused is understanding the New Testament from the context of its original authorship. As Ive already said this Commentary series is not highly academic yet it cannot be described as popular level. It is a good mixture between the two. I truly look forward to each and every installment in this new fascinating series.

    The first commentary in this series focuses on the gospel of Mark. This commentary by Andrew T. Le Peau is truly insightful. A lightweight commentary weighing in at just over 352 pages, is a preachers dream. For it helps decontextualized the modern-day reader as well as giving in-depth and practical application for those teaching through the gospel of Mark exegetically. For those who are interested this commentary does have a deep Baptist bent to it yet it is not so overwhelming that those of other theological positions cannot truly benefit from it.

    The only downside to this well produced commentaries is the introduction to the gospel itself. While there few introductory matters covered I was very underwhelmed at the content. Conversely the commentary proper was full of valuable nuggets that a preacher could mind. Another issue I had with this volume is its treatment on the ending of Mark. While Le Peau argues for the shortening of Mark he still ends up putting over four pages of commentary towards the content of Mark 16:9-20. Outside of these notable issues this commentary is undoubtedly helpful to a preacher as well as to the educated Layman who may be teaching through the gospel of Mark. I Dare for recommended to those in need of a good application based yet grounded in its original context commentary.

    These books was provided to me free of charge from Kregel Press in exchange for an unbiased, honest review.
  4. Jimmy Reagan
    Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Helpful!
    December 11, 2017
    Jimmy Reagan
    Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book is the inaugural volume in the Through Old Testament Eyes commentary series. Series editor Andrew T. Le Peau contributes this volume on the Gospel of Mark. As we are starting to see such a proliferation of commentary series these days that the market is almost glutted, so a new series especially needs a unique contribution to not get lost in the multifarious market. If this first volume is any indication, I think this series is going to have something to say thats not found in others. The Old Testament angle is only part of its success.

    Be sure to read the Series Preface to see how its set up. In the Introduction to Marks Gospel, you immediately see that this series is aimed at pastors and Bible students, not academic types. He gives a long movie analogy of movies borrowing from older movies to describe Marks borrowing from the Old Testament. Its in this Introduction that you find one of the highlights that will be carried through the whole commentary. Scholars often make a discussion of structure a quite nebulous exercise, but he takes it and in a few paragraphs turns it into something truly helpful. Compared to others, the Introduction is short, but I think it succeeds for what this series intends to be.

    Every passage has commentary with an emphasis on its relation to the Old Testament. That does help where other commentaries sometimes lack. Its those sections in the dark shading that I love the most. They contain all kinds of helpful information. It often involves explaining structure. Many times theres a helpful chart that aids understanding even more.

    I see this commentary as the perfect secondary commentary. It holds up well with the other serious paperback commentaries on the market. If this series can sustain what we have here, it will likely be quite successful. In any event, this first work on Mark is a winner.

    I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255.
  5. Jim West
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Reading Mark
    December 7, 2017
    Jim West
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Through Old Testament Eyes is a new kind of commentary series that opens the New Testament writings in greater depth to anyone committed to understanding or teaching Scripture. In this inaugural volume, the richness of Old Testament allusions and background in Mark clarifies puzzling passages and explains others in fresh ways.

    The exodus motif structures Mark. Mark also presents Jesus as the true temple of God in contrast to the existing temple, which has been corrupted. These important themes are hidden to modern eyes without the insight of an Old Testament perspective, and this commentary builds on that insight to emphasize how the gospel applies to the daily lives of Christians today.

    Kregel was kind enough to send a review copy. Ive always loved the Old Testament in the New Testament aspect of biblical studies and indeed, my ThM thesis was on the use of Isaiah in the Gospel of John. So this is, as they say, right up my alley.

    The bulk of the volume is made up of verse by verse commentary on the Gospel of Mark but it also includes an Introduction and a list of abbreviations and a select bibliography, end notes, and Scripture index.

    The introduction covers some unusual topics (for a commentary) such as a few paragraphs explaining the New Testament writers familiarity with the Old Testament, the treatment of obscure references, and then the more normal topic of the structure of Mark, who Mark was, and his use of the Old Testament. Its a quite helpful guide to what the author is aiming to achieve here.

    The Commentary proper is then immediately turned to. Phrase by phrase and sometimes word by word, Le Peau guides readers not only through the Marcan text but through the Old Testament subtext. For instance, of 1:4, he writes

    In the wilderness. Allusions to the exodus of Israel in the wilderness that began in 1:2-3 continue here.

    And then of course he goes into further detail for another full page on this verse alone.

    One of the things readers can expect to find fairly regularly is the phrase See comment at ______________ (where the blank indicates the passage location where the issue is previously discussed). Cf, for instance, at Mark 3:1.

    Throughout the volume there are blocks of material that in other volumes would be excurses or extensive footnotes. These are set off from the body of the text by use of greyed boxes. They range in length from fairly short to very long, depending on our authors perception that a particular issue needs more or less extensive discussion.

    The author does not include the long ending of Mark in his exegesis and instead relegates it (rightly, since it is not authentic) to one of his many greyed-box excurses.

    Overall, then, this volume does the job it was intended to do. It explains the text of the Gospel of Mark by paying particular attention to the points of contact Mark contains in connection to the Old Testament. It is simple and at places simplistic, utilizing fairly standard tropes like the number seven is the number of perfection and that sort of thing as well as taking the reconstructed history of Israel based on a simple straightforward reading of the Old Testament as a given. Readers will enjoy it so long as they dont expect too much of it. It doesnt address textual or historical issues (relating to the Gospel itself) and there are not what one might consider a lot of endnotes (just about 6 pages for 310 page book).

    It is not an academic volume, and does not wish to be. What it wishes to be is a study guide for small groups or churches and in that respect, with that aim in mind, it achieves its goal magnificently.
Displaying items 1-5 of 5
Page 1 of 1

Author/Artist Review

Author: Andrew T. Le Peau
Located in: Downers Grove, IL
Submitted: October 03, 2017

    Tell us a little about yourself.  For thirty years I was the associate publisher for editorial at InterVarsity Press and taught the gospel of Mark for over a decade to college students. I am currently a writer and editor who blogs at Andy Unedited on the InterVarsity Press website.

    What was your motivation behind this project?  When I taught students the gospel of Mark, certain passages regularly perplexed them, such as: • Why does Mark describe what John the Baptist wears (camel hair, leather belt) and eats (honey, locusts) when he doesn’t do this for Jesus, Pilate, or Peter? • Why does Mark say Jesus meant to pass by the disciples while their boat was struggling against the wind? Didn’t he see them? Didn’t he care? • Why does Mark mention the detail of the grass being green in describing the feeding of the five thousand? Does that really matter? To answer these and many other questions, I would point them to key Old Testament passages. When they read those, they had classic "aha!" reactions. Now they understood. Over the years I began to see that the Old Testament was a key resource not only in understanding difficult passages, but even those we think we already knew. This led me deeper and deeper into Mark and into the Old Testament.

    What do you hope folks will gain from this project?  The challenge of understanding Jesus was overwhelming for the first disciples. He came as a startling, powerful, and unexpected figure is so many ways, they didn't quite know what to make of him. So Mark used all the best tools in his toolbox so he and his readers could wrap their minds around who Jesus was. The name of his toolbox was the Old Testament. By portraying Jesus as the New Moses, the New Israel, the New David, the Divine Warrior, the Son of man, the Son of God, the New Temple, the New Exodus and so much more, we can gain a new, larger understanding of Jesus (and of the Christian life) than we thought possible before.

    How were you personally impacted by working on this project?  When I began writing the book, I still wondered if what I had in mind was even possible. Was every paragraph, nearly every verse of Mark actually infused with the Old Testament the way I suspected it might? By the time I finished the first chapter of Mark, I no longer had any doubts. Even though I knew the Old Testament beforehand, this project has made me want to know and study it even more.

    Who are your influences, sources of inspiration or favorite authors / artists?  Many authors have been extremely helpful to me in writing this book, including G. K. Beale, Kenneth E. Bailey, Richard Hays, N. T. Wright, Mark Strauss, Willard Swartley, Rikki Watts, and Christopher J. H. Wright.

    Anything else you'd like readers / listeners to know:  The New Testament writers were Old Testament people. Without a firm appreciation of the Old Testament, we cannot adequately understand their life and message.

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