1. Things We Didn't Say - eBookThis product is an eBook
    Amy Lynn Green
    Bethany House / 2020 / ePub
    Our Price$9.89 Retail Price$15.99 Save 38% ($6.10)
    4.5 out of 5 stars for Things We Didn't Say - eBook. View reviews of this product. 29 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    Stock No: WW107525EB
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  1. reli
    WI
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    A collections of letters and articles that has you turning the pages rapidly
    November 10, 2021
    reli
    WI
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    This review was written for Things We Didn't Say.
    Written as a series of letters, Amy Lynn Green crafts an interesting story that has you rapidly turning the pages in a quest to find out what really happens. Enough information is shared in the letters and newspaper articles to get an idea of what is going on, but there is still enough left unsaid that has you reading between the lines and wondering what will happen in the end.

    The book focuses on POW camps in the US with a side serving of Japanese internment camps. The letters are mostly between an American spitfire and a Japanese-American civilian who is teaching at a military school. Joanna, the American, is snarky and funny and has no idea about manners and etiquette. She says things like they are, which, as you can imagine, doesn't always endear her to the general public. Peter, the Japanese-American, tries to guide her correctly, but it also obvious he loves her despite her quirks.

    "Sometimes showing grace breaks us before it heals us. Forgiveness can feel like a betrayal of justice. We want others to deserve grace, or at least ask for it, even knowing full well that the greatest grace was extended to us when we were enemies."

    I really enjoyed this book and while I wouldn't want all my books to epistolary in format, this was a refreshing change from the normal style of writing.

    I received this book from Bethany House via NetGalley and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are my own.
  2. Loraine
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Impressive debut novel
    August 4, 2021
    Loraine
    This review was written for Things We Didn't Say.
    This was an impressive debut novel. I really enjoyed the story style which was written entirely in personal letters and newspaper articles. The history of utilizing German POWs for American farm labor was something that I was not familiar with. It made for interesting conflict.
  3. LifeofLiterature
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Interesting and Well-Written
    April 17, 2021
    LifeofLiterature
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for Things We Didn't Say.
    I'll admit that I was a little nervous to read this book because I've never read an expository novel before, but I was surprised after a few chapters to find myself getting into a rhythm that allowed the story to flow quite naturally. I really liked Johanna and her tender yet fiercely strong heart as she tackled a task of compassion despite resistance from her townspeople. I think the style of writing allowed me to get closest to Johanna. I did really like learning about the history and thought the novel was well researched. I also liked the spiritual themes artfully woven into the story without being preachy. Overall, this was an interesting and enjoyable novel and I look forward to what the author will pen next!

    I received a complimentary ecopy of this book from Netgalley and Bethany House Publishers. Opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.
  4. Perrianne
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Novel Written in Letters and Documents
    February 13, 2021
    Perrianne
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for Things We Didn't Say.
    In a stunning debut novel, Johanna Bergland is torn from her university studies to become the translator and letter censor at Camp Ironside POW camp in Minnesota during WW II. It is told in an epistolary style through letters, newspaper articles, and other documents.

    I appreciated Johanna's heart, as she took kindness a step forward in dealing with the prisoners, which at times was to her detriment. Johanna was a high profile citizen, being the daughter of the mayor, which definitely put her family in a difficult situation more than once. There are some delightful character throughout the book, and her Japanese American pen pal, Peter Ito, is one of my favorites, but is also one who could potentially get her in deep trouble. Although a novel written in letter, and document format is not my favorite, it did allow me to read the book in very small increments, which was somewhat helpful with a bit of a hefty tome. I am anxious to see what the author has for us next and will definitely read her next novel.

    I borrowed a copy of this book from my local public library andI was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 Code of Federal Regulations Part 255 Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  5. Faye
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Well Executed
    February 7, 2021
    Faye
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for Things We Didn't Say.
    The title of this book is so fitting. Told completely through correspondence sent and unsent, as well as newspaper articles and editorials, the story unfolds just as much from what is written as what is left unsaid between the lines.

    Joanna Berglund reluctantly returns to her hometown leaving behind her language studies at the University of Minnesota to fulfill the requirements of her scholarship with patriotic service working as a translator for a German POW camp in her hometown. Joanna has a gift for language, and a passion to take her education as far as she can, she can be stubborn and blunt, which often puts her at odds with the townspeople of which her father is mayor. She writes many letters over the course of the book, but the ones that form the framework of the story are the ones between her and her dear friend Peter Ito, a second generation Japanese American, who is serving his country as a language teacher for military intelligence.

    Peter is easily my favorite character in this book, he takes things as they come, he loves his country, but struggles with how America has treated him and his family. He is the perfect temper to Joanna's flame, I loved how they both encourage each other and bring out the best in each other. I admired his hope, honesty, and strong faith in God.

    Compelling and well executed, I was skeptical when I first learned that the story would be told completely through letters, but it works well in this instance, and I liked that it left parts to be filled in by my imagination. I loved how Joanna is most honest in her letters to Peter, and that this book addresses the tough questions that Joanna struggles with, like prejudice, justice, and loving our enemies. In short I liked that she had questions, and challenges the pat answers. Everything comes together with a stunning ending that had me glued to the page.

    Overall, a worthy read that stuck with me long after I'd turned the last page, with a hero and heroine that I could cheer for throughout. I will definitely be reading more books from this author in the future!

    I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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