1. Things I Wish I'd Known Before We Became Parents - eBookThis product is an eBook
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    Gary D. Chapman, Shannon Warden
    Northfield Publishing / 2016 / ePub
    Our Price$7.06 Retail Price$11.99 Save 41% ($4.93)
    4.5 out of 5 stars for Things I Wish I'd Known Before We Became Parents - eBook. View reviews of this product. 3 Reviews
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  1. Brianna
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Things I Wish I'd Known Before We Became Parents
    September 24, 2017
    Brianna
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Yet again, Gary Chapman delivers a solid and practical resource for life. Together with Dr. Shannon Warner, Dr. Chapman prepares couples to become parents by exploring topics and questions he (Chapman) would like to have known before having children. Things I Wish Id Known Before We Became Parents should be given to every married couple preparing to expand their family through birth or adoption.

    Chapman and Warner write honestly; they present possible struggles realistically, but they also recognize the immense joy and satisfaction that can come from raising children. The discussion questions included with each chapter are thorough and creative. Some of the discussions and activities prompted by these questions will likely be remembered long after the reader puts down the book. For instance, my husband and I read Chapmans Things I Wish Id Known Before We Got Married several years ago and we still reminisce about one of the discussion questions we talked about at that time.

    Additionally, while culture, including Christian culture, emphasizes preparation for children in the realm of fashionable nurseries, do-it-yourself baby food and baby toys, and gift registries, Chapman and Warner present content for new parents. This reality-check content is often overlooked in the midst of social media, pictures, and dreams.

    I highly recommend Things I Wish Id Known Before We Became Parents. Even though I do not have children, I think the questions Chapman highlights encourage honest discussion between husband and wife that would be beneficial for any marriage.

    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in order to write an honest, unbiased review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  2. Just Commonly
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Insightful and easy to read
    November 11, 2016
    Just Commonly
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
    Meets Expectations: 0
    "...you can't always predict what will happen, but you can always find hope in your circumstances." (15)

    Hope. That is what I have in picking up Things I Wish I'd Known Before We Became Parents by Gary Chapman with Shannon Warden. The above words from Dr. Warden in the introduction of the book spoke of why I want to read books on parenting, when at the moment, I am not a parent yet. I guess you could say it's perfect timing, because now I know things before I am a parent. And this book gives you just that, knowledge, information and communicative tips through the "talking it over" section at the end of each chapter. I should be an expert by now! Just kidding. Not even close. One of the main points I got out of Things I Wish is the very fact that it can never be measured. Parenting is hard, even chaotic at times, but children are blessings and they are living beings. They mold, model and eventually strive to be who they are themselves.

    Topics like budget, schedules, discipline, emotional health and social skills makes up for just a handful of the topics discussed, each taking up one chapter (there's a total of 12 chapters). Each chapter is easy to read with personal questions for discussion or self discovery at the end. Things I Wish I'd Known Before We Became Parents are straightforward and information. I appreciate that it's written in simple terms in a natural matter that isn't preachy, but still modeling Christian beliefs throughout. I can imagine myself rereading this periodically if I am a parent.

    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and have not been compensated for this. This is my honest opinion.
  3. contemplativereflections
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Book Review: Things I Wish I'd Known before We Became Parents
    October 5, 2016
    contemplativereflections
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
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    In "Things I Wish I'd Known before We Became Parents," Gary Chapman and Shannon Warden use their professional and personal experience to examine the many aspects of parenting that parents-to-be should consider. The main thesis is that in addition to the joys and thrills of parenting, there are also a number of issues that couples should work through together before their little ones come along so that informed choices can be made ahead of time. Although the book is fairly short, the material covers a handful of imminent issues that needs to be addressed early on ranging from physical needs (e.g. potty training) to emotional and social development. With their extensive experience and knowledge in clinical psychology, the authors provide a succinct collection of tips that may prove helpful to young parents. For example, Chapman's five languages of apology can be a useful method to encourage children and parents to express forgiveness and work towards reconciliation. Moreover, the authors divulge the parenting struggles with their own children highlighting what has or has not worked in their homes. At the end of each chapter, there are extensive discussion questions for couples to reflect on the material and work on together.

    One point that I suggest for Christian readers is to complement this book with another parenting book that focuses on the theology of parenting. Besides learning about techniques and methods, parents need to formulate a theological framework which informs their decisions and actions as primary influencers of their children especially at an early age. This is not to say that I do not appreciate the advice that the authors provide as I do find many of the ideas fairly intriguing. However, how we implement these parenting guidelines is not merely a matter of preference but is firmly based on our theological convictions. Without a parenting approach that is grounded in the gospel, we are relegated to behaviour modification that does not ultimately meet the greatest need of our children which is their need for a Saviour.

    I recommend this book to all parents-to-be and even to parents with children already as the material is applicable to children of all ages. Naturally, the topics skew towards the early childhood years as the intended audience are those looking for guidance before children arrive. As a whole, the suggestions are pragmatic so readers will find the suggestions to be useful to their everyday parenting tasks. The authors emphasize that the stress of parenting can be alleviated with proper planning, patience, and perseverance. Also, Chapman and Warden remind parents that the years of rearing young children will pass by quickly so we should savour the precious experiences and memories that we create and share with our children every day.

    In compliance with Federal Trade Commission guidelines, I received a review copy from Moody Press in exchange for a book review.
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