The Parables of Jesus   -     By: James Montgomery Boice
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The Parables of Jesus

Moody Publishers / 2016 / Paperback

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Product Description

A beloved classic that explores the power of Jesus' parables

Grouping the parables into five categories - teachings on the kingdom, salvation, wisdom/folly, the Christian life, and judgment - James Montgomery Boice brings Christ's words to bear on life today. Born from a sermon series he once preached, The Parables of Jesus helps believers understand just what Jesus meant and how we ought to respond.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 261
Vendor: Moody Publishers
Publication Date: 2016
Dimensions: 8.5 X 5.5 X 0.6 (inches)
ISBN: 0802414494
ISBN-13: 9780802414496

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Publisher's Description

"Some sections of the Bible give us grand theology. Some move us to grateful responses to God. But the parables break through mere words and make us ask whether there has indeed been any real difference in our lives."

In this beloved classic, James Boice takes us systematically through the parables of Jesus, grouping them into five categories: parables of the kingdom, salvation, wisdom and folly, the Christian life, and judgment.

In each section Boice brings Jesus' words to bear on life today. Through his careful study and clear explanation of each parable—born from a sermon series he preached at the Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, where he pastored for 32 years—he helps us understand just what Jesus meant, and how our hearts and lives ought to respond.

Jesus' parables are memorable for a reason. Discover their power for yourself.

Author Bio

JAMES MONTGOMERY BOICE (1938-2000) (A.B., Harvard University; B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; D.Th., University of Basel, Switzerland; D.D., Theological Seminary of the Reformed Episcopal Church) was speaker on the worldwide radio ministry of the Bible Study Hour and pastor of historic Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. His titles include Jesus on Trial and The Doctrines of Grace. He was married to Linda Ann Boice, who continues to teach at the high school they co-founded.

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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Overall Great Book with Good Theology
    March 1, 2016
    A.S. Lester
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Overview

    James Montgomery Boice was a faithful and passionate pastor of the Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, where he served for over thirty years. The vast majority of his sermons (if not all of them) were expository in nature, and some of the characteristics that made him such a beloved pastor/teacher (a high view of Scripture, attention to detail, and a love for God's Word) are evidence in this work: The Parables of Jesus.

    The book's content was birthed from a series of sermons he preached in the winter of 1980-81 (9). By his own admission, Boice first approached the parables as a series of messages that could be crafted without the toil other passages might present, yet while in the series he became captivated by the parables and desired to treat them in a more comprehensive way (9). That desire would eventually give birth to this book, which is divided into five sections that correspond to the five categories of the parables: Parables of the Kingdom, Parables of Salvation, Parables of Wisdom and Folly, Parables of the Christian Life, and Parables of Judgment.

    Strengths

    There is much to love about this book. As mentioned before, Boice was a passionate communicator of God's Word. I have often heard that a good preacher should not stand to speak until he has studied enough, and prayed enough, that his heart is gripped with both the truth of the passage and the hearts of those to whom he will speak. The author's passion for truth is something that has not been lost in the sermon-to-manuscript transition. While one reads this book, it is not hard to imagine him speaking to the masses, urging them to respond to the wisdom and truth of Scripture. He pleads with fathers to be intentional in leading of their families, with mothers to be tender in the spiritual care of their daughters, and for the lost to turn to Jesus and be saved (50-51, 244-245). His passion for others to live the truth is Scripture is demonstrated well in the parable on not giving up (Luke 11:5-13; 18:1-8), where he pleads with the righteousness to continue in prayer, if for nothing but revival alone (191-192). The author's heart for God, and for others, is an unmistakable theme throughout the text.

    Boice also handles Scripture with integrity, a characteristic that seems to be increasingly scarce among those who occupy pulpits across America. I appreciate his care to differentiate between a parable, a fable, and an allegory (14). Such a distinction is important, as many have treaded into dangerous exegetical waters by trying to find a hidden meaning behind every little detail of each parable. When appropriate, however, Boice does not hesitate to dive into the details and demonstrate how the unique emphasis of each parable contributes to its overall message. A good example here is how he handles the parable of the dragnet, showing its particular emphasis is not what it has in common with other parables of the Kingdom, but in what it offers that is different (44-46). Likewise he does not shy away from hard subjects, like extending forgiveness to others even when that is difficult to do (215), or the narrow message that Christ alone can save and the finality of the eternal state of those separated from God (244).

    Weaknesses

    It is hard to point out a glaring "weaknesses" of the book without feeling one is being too critical. It could be pointed out that the parables are interpreted and applied from a Reformed/Calvinistic perspective. This is to be expected, however, since the content of the book was birthed from a sermon series, and it is impossible for any pastor/teacher not to view Scripture thru the lens of his theological convictions. The book also fails to contribute any real academic value, but again, one could argue the intended audience is not the professor or researcher who is looking for a work that gives attention to grammatical construction. One would assume Boice gave consideration to such things during his own private study, but to expect those insights to be worked out in the final manuscript of a sermon is unrealistic.

    The grouping of the parables into five categories can, at times, seem obligatory, and one could argue that it might cause the student of Scripture to read into a text what may not be there. On the other hand, the content of any book (or sermon series for that matter) must be structured in such a way that the reader can easily grasp the overall organization of the material.

    Finally, it could be pointed out that the book ends abruptly. Boice offers no postlude, concluding remarks, or anything that may direct the reader on into a continuing study of the parables. It should be noted, however, that the book does include a Notes section (247). Here one could find authors and titles for additional study.

    Target Audience

    As previously mentioned, the professor or student researching a thesis isn't likely to find much value in this book. However, as characteristic of Boice, the book is scripturally sound, logical, and easy to understand. The reader will not find a bunch of theological words or concepts that is difficult to understand. If one is looking for help in understanding the nature many of the parables, and how they may apply to one's life, this work would be a great starting place.

    Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review.
  2. Harrison, AR
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Overall makes good points but sometimes seems to miss the original intent
    December 21, 2015
    Debbie from ChristFocus
    Harrison, AR
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    This review was written for The Parables of Jesus - eBook.
    "The Parables of Jesus" is based on a sermon series. There was an emphasis on finding application points, but Boice generally did stay focused on the parables. For example, he pointed out that hard ground symbolized a hard heart, then he looked at what Scripture says about how someone becomes hard-hearted.

    At times, though, I felt like the author tried to pull more out of the parable than was originally intended or even missed the original intent. Perhaps due to when the book was originally published (1983), he rarely brought in the cultural aspects relating to the parables or examined the hard-to-translate words. For example, he apparently didn't know that a "good eye" is a Jewish idiom for a generous person, so he talked about someone who can see well versus someone who can't. He made good points, but I still think he missed the original intent.

    He also brought up Calvinist teachings as the basis for how he interpreted various parables. If you don't share his starting point, you might not agree with some of the lessons he drew from these parables. Overall, I thought he made good points and he got me thinking. I'd recommend this book to those interested in a sermon-style take on the parables.

    He covered: Parables of the Kingdom (Matthew 13:1-52), Parables of Salvation (Luke 15:1-32, Matthew 20:1-16, Matthew 22:1-14, Luke 13:22-30, Luke 18:9-14), Parables of Wisdom and Folly (Matthew 25:1-13, Luke 12:13-21, Luke 16:1-9, Luke 6:46-49), Parables of the Christian Life (Matthew 21:28-32, Luke 8:16-18 & 11:33-36, Luke 10:25-37, Luke 11:5-13 & 18:1-8, Luke 7:36-50), Parables of Judgment (Matthew 18:21-35, Matthew 21:33-46, Matthew 25:14-46, Luke 16:19-31).

    I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
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