1. Reprobation and God's Sovereignty: Recovering a Biblical Doctrine
    Peter Sammons
    Kregel Academic & Professional / 2022 / Trade Paperback
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    5 out of 5 stars for Reprobation and God's Sovereignty: Recovering a Biblical Doctrine. View reviews of this product. 7 Reviews
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  1. Andrew
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Good book that explains things that most Christians dont want to talk about
    January 5, 2023
    Andrew
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I just recently finished this book, it explained a lot of things including secondary causailty, which i found helpful.

    It was well written, there are a few spelling mistakes (generally early on) even within the footnotes of some pages, but the book has served its purpose in making the point of Reprobation clear. It wasnt too repetitive at all throughout the whole book. I would reccomend this book to Calvinists and Arminians alike.
  2. Joseph
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Clearly written polemic against a common error
    February 25, 2022
    Joseph
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Peter Sammons has collected together the questions that are often posed concerning God's decree for the non-elect, that is the reprobate, and provides logical reasoning through biblical exegesis. This book is a helpful resource for someone who is looking to either jump into the topic for the first time or gain a better grasp of God's sovereignty in light of salvation from an eternal perspective. This book is both pastoral and academic which proves that he was the right man to write on this topic. There is a DANGER that comes from ignoring this topic, so I would recommend every by the good Dr.'s book.
  3. JournalOfABibliophile
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great resource!
    February 21, 2022
    JournalOfABibliophile
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

    Reprobation and God's Sovereignty: Recovering a Biblical Doctrine was written by Peter Sammons and has a short forward by Pastor John MacArthur. Peter Sammons (PhD, The Master's Seminary) is the director of academic publications at The Seminary Master's and the managing editor of The Master's Seminary Journal.

    What is reprobation? A topic that is sure to start arguments and make you lose friends and close relationships with your family members. It is a sensitive topic, and it has been a hot topic here in the past few months on social media among former Calvinists.

    So what really is reprobation? Within Calvinism and Reformed Theology we believe that God predestines people (the elect) to salvation. So since God predestines people to salvation through election then there must be predestination to damnation (that is either passive or active depending on who you are reading or talking to... I hold the view that God passively predestines people, or the non-elect to damnation- He passes them by).

    Election is a huge topic for debate and sets Calvinism apart from Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Lutheranism, and some branches of Protestantism. It is also a topic that is often misunderstood, or people just plain out misrepresent and slander Calvinists. Heck, some Calvinists don't even know how to properly describe God's sovereignty and human's responsibility, and they don't know how to connect the dots outside of Romans 9.

    In his fairly short book, Sammons walks the reader through the doctrine of reprobation and takes you all throughout the bible to defend the doctrine. This is an academic book for more intermediate readers... It has Greek. I think the average lay person might find this a bit intimidating and hard to follow at times, but if you are familiar with theology, or you want to challenge yourself, it is easy to understand and follow. It is very pastoral and in depth if you are a student of theology, pastor, author, etc you will love it.

    Sammons has another book called Reprobation: From Augustine to the Synod of Dort that looks pretty interesting.
  4. PV
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Helpful Resource on Challenging Doctrine
    February 11, 2022
    PV
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The doctrine of reprobation is one which is one which does not often get discussed, let alone have books written about it, so when I saw Peter Sammons Reprobation and Gods Sovereignty I was intrigued. Sammons is able to successfully carry out his intention for this book, which is to help faithful Christians understand reprobation properly and to help them recognize and establish the role of secondary causes (15).

    Sammons begins his book by going through the text of Romans 9 to show how this passage not only defends the doctrine of predestination but also reprobation. This is broken into several chapters, which allows Sammons to make sure that his readers are able to follow his explanation of Pauls words in Romans 9. Since the doctrine of reprobation has been plagued with a negative reputation, primarily from misunderstandings of its actual teaching (105), Sammons moves from showing where the doctrine can be found in Scripture to clearly explaining what is meant by reprobation. As he carefully clarifies what is meant by God passing some men by, with the operations of His special grace, [to] punish them for their sins, to the manifestation of His justice (119) and the four elements contained in Gods decree and execution of reprobation, Sammons makes clear distinctions between the way Arminianism and hyper-Calvinism misunderstand this doctrine. After clearly defining what is meant by each element of reprobation and responding to traditional objections Sammons moves on to showing how a correct understanding of secondary causality is necessary for fully understanding this doctrine. Using the Aristotelian understanding of the four categories of causes (material, formal, efficient, final), Sammons shows how the doctrine of causality safeguards the integrity of both agents (God and man), so God ensures a particular outcome without rendering it a robotic necessary cause (192). Sammons finishes his book by reminding the reader that believers are responsible for searching out and teaching the whole council of Gods Word, which includes a meaningful examination of the doctrine of reprobation (264) and that in response to such a vital doctrine, believers should praise God for His remarkable, though mysterious, wisdom (274).

    Having only read about reprobation in shorter sections of larger books, I appreciated Sammons willingness to think through the various elements and objections to reprobation. This does an excellent job parsing out different theological or philosophical ideas in a clear and understandable manner which leaves the reader with a better understanding of the doctrine of reprobation. Even with this clarity, a reader who is not familiar with some of the phrases or concepts which are being contemplated could have a more difficult time following the arguments in some sections.

    I appreciated that Sammons included some pages on how this doctrine should impact the life of the reader. This is clearly not just a book which is written to show that Sammons knew a lot about this doctrine, but there is the hope that the pondering of this doctrine will influence the believers life. I wondered if his application about preaching the Gospel could have included a paragraph about how, in light of the heaviness of the topic of reprobation and the more academic tone of the book, to do that with wisdom.

    This book is also filled with numerous quotes from throughout Church history. I appreciated how Sammons expertly used these to show how the Church has understood this doctrine throughout history. Besides often being memorable and clear in their explanations, these quotes also give comfort to the reader that the larger figures in Church history also wrestled with this doctrine.

    I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in further understanding the doctrine of reprobation.

    Disclosure: I received this book free from Kregel Academic through their blogger review program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255
  5. Andrew Wencl
    Indianapolis, IN
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The difficult doctrine of reprobation
    January 14, 2022
    Andrew Wencl
    Indianapolis, IN
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    In some Christian circles, affirming belief in reprobation or double predestination is enough to warrant the label Hyper-Calvinist. But is that fair? Is it true? Petter Sammons recognizes that the word reprobation can elicit a powerful negative reaction in people, yet he is convinced that it is a biblical doctrine. His book, based on his doctoral thesis, aims to both define and defend the doctrine of reprobation, particularly against the charge that it makes God guilty of sin.

    From the onset, Sammons is careful to define terms. One of his frustrations in working through this doctrine and evaluating what people have said about it is that those who reject the doctrine rarely employ the same definitions as those who advocate for it. Sammons points out the unfairness of such behavior while treating other (Arminian) views respectfully even as he explains why he finds them deficient.

    As this book is a defense of reprobation, I appreciated his careful attention to Scripture, particularly Romans 9. He does not shy away from grammatical and lexical arguments based on Greek and Hebrew. Sammons also interacts with a wide range of Scriptures that address God's sovereignty, election, hardening of sinners' hearts, and human agency in sin.

    Too often the discussion of reprobation is characterized by heat rather than light. Reprobation and God's Sovereignty is a refreshing contrast to those fruitless debates, and it's where I recommend starting for anyone interested in a coherent and well-argued defense of the doctrine.

    Note: I received a review copy of this book from the publisher.

    Quotes:

    [S]omething that both Calvinists and Arminians can agree on is that at the end of the age God has an authoritative right to judge every person based on the life they have lived.

    The Calvinist maintains that God directly intervenes in regenerating the elect to bring them to salvation, but does not have to directly intervene in the non-elect in order for them to receive condemnation.

    God does not elect to save those whom he first sees exercising faith and repentance. On the contrary, God grants faith and repentance to those individuals whom he first elected to save.

    Reprobation is not purely passive - God's choice to reprobate is an active choice. It is not an afterthought or simply the logical byproduct of neglecting to assign an eternal destination for the non-elect.

    Every one either has Christ as their substitute to bear their sins, or they will bear their own.
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