Religion and Superstition in Reformation Europe1994 Edition
Religion and Superstition in Reformation Europe1994 Edition  -     Edited By: Helen Parish, William G. Naphy
    By: Helen Parish(ED.) & William G. Naphy(ED.)
Buy Item $33.75
In Stock
Stock No: WW061585
Manchester University Press / 2003 / Paperback
Quantity:

Add To Cart

Paypal Buy Now
Add To Wishlist
Quantity:


Add To Cart

Paypal Buy Now
Wishlist

Religion and Superstition in Reformation Europe1994 Edition

Manchester University Press / 2003 / Paperback

In Stock
Stock No: WW061585


Product Close-up
This product is not available for expedited shipping.
* This product is available for shipment only to the USA.

Product Description

What, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, was 'superstition'? Where might it be found, and how might it be countered? How was the term used, and how effective a weapon was it in the assault on traditional religion?. The ease with which accusations of 'superstition' slipped into the language of Reformation debate has ensured that one of the most fought over terms in the history of early modern popular culture, especially religious culture, is also one of the most difficult to define. Offers a novel approach to the issue, based upon national and regional studies, and examinations of attitudes to prophets, ghosts, saints and demonology, alongside an analysis of Catholic responses to the Reformation and the apparent presence of 'superstition' in the reformed churches. Challenges the assumptions that Catholic piety was innately superstitious, while Protestantism was rational, and suggests that the early modern concept of 'superstition' needs more careful treatment by historians. Demands that the terminology and presuppositions of historical discourse on the Reformation be altered to remove lingering sectarian polemic.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 272
Vendor: Manchester University Press
Publication Date: 2003
Dimensions: 9.36 X 6.22 X 0.80 (inches)
ISBN: 071906158X
ISBN-13: 9780719061585
Series: Studies in Early Modern European History

Publisher's Description

What, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, was 'superstition'? Where might it be found, and how might it be countered? How was the term used, and how effective a weapon was it in the assault on traditional religion?. The ease with which accusations of 'superstition' slipped into the language of Reformation debate has ensured that one of the most fought over terms in the history of early modern popular culture, especially religious culture, is also one of the most difficult to define. Offers a novel approach to the issue, based upon national and regional studies, and examinations of attitudes to prophets, ghosts, saints and demonology, alongside an analysis of Catholic responses to the Reformation and the apparent presence of 'superstition' in the reformed churches. Challenges the assumptions that Catholic piety was innately superstitious, while Protestantism was rational, and suggests that the early modern concept of 'superstition' needs more careful treatment by historians. Demands that the terminology and presuppositions of historical discourse on the Reformation be altered to remove lingering sectarian polemic.

Author Bio


Helen Parish is Lecturer in History at the University of Reading

William G. Naphy is Senior Lecturer in History and Head of Department at the University of Aberdeen

Ask a Question

Find Related Products

Author/Artist Review

Back
×

Ask a Question

What would you like to know about this product? Please enter your name, your email and your question regarding the product in the fields below, and we'll answer you in the next 24-48 hours.

If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.