Reformation Theology: A Systematic Summary
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Crossway / 2017 / Hardcover
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Reformation Theology: A Systematic Summary

Edited By: Matthew Barrett
Crossway / 2017 / Hardcover

In Stock
Stock No: WW543281


Product Description

Offering a systematic and comprehensive summary of the key doctrines taught and defended by the 16th century Reformers from a collection of expert theologians and historians committed Reformation thought, this volume serves as a manifesto for the church, highlighting the importance, relevance, and indispensability of Reformation theology—for both understanding the 16th century and for grasping its significance for the 21st century. Contributors include Matthew Barrett, Graham Cole, Robert Kolb, Donald Macleod, Michael Reeves, Carl Trueman, Cornelis Venema, and more.

Product Information

Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 640
Vendor: Crossway
Publication Date: 2017
Dimensions: 9.00 X 6.00 (inches)
ISBN: 1433543281
ISBN-13: 9781433543289

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Publisher's Description

Offering readers a comprehensive summary of the major tenets of Reformation theology, this volume convincingly demonstrates the Reformation’s enduring importance for the church today.

Author Bio

Matthew Barrett (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is associate professor of Christian theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including God’s Word Alone; and Owen on the Christian Life; and Reformation Theology.

Michael Horton (PhD, University of Coventry and Wycliffe Hall, Oxford) is the J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary in California. In addition to being the author of many popular and academic books, he is also the editor in chief of Modern Reformation magazine, a host of the White Horse Inn radio broadcast, and a minister in the United Reformed Churches.

Gerald Bray (DLitt, University of Paris-Sorbonne) is research professor at Beeson Divinity School and director of research for the Latimer Trust. He is a prolific writer and has authored or edited numerous books, including The Doctrine of GodBiblical Interpretation, God Is Love, and God Has Spoken.

Graham A. Cole (ThD, Australian College of Theology) is the dean and professor of biblical and systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. An ordained Anglican minister, he has served in two parishes and was formerly the principal of Ridley College. Graham lives in Libertyville, Illinois, with his wife, Jules.

J. V. Fesko (PhD, University of Aberdeen, Scotland) is the academic dean and professor of systematic and historical theology at Westminster Seminary California. He was the pastor of Geneva Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Woodstock, Georgia, for ten years. J. V. lives in Escondido, California, with his wife, Anneke, and their three children.

Michael Reeves (PhD, King’s College, London) is president and professor of theology at Union School of Theology in Oxford. He is the author of Delighting in the Trinity, Rejoicing in Christ, and The Unquenchable Flame: Discovering the Heart of the Reformation.

Mark D. Thompson (DPhil, University of Oxford) is the principal of Moore Theological College in Sydney, Australia, and head of the department of theology, philosophy, and ethics.

Carl R. Trueman (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is the Paul Woolley Professor of Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary and pastor of Cornerstone Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Ambler, Pennsylvania. He was editor of Themelios for nine years, has authored or edited more than a dozen books, and has contributed to multiple publications including the Dictionary of Historical Theology and The Cambridge Companion to Reformation Theology.

Cornelis P. Venema (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) serves as the president of Mid-America Reformed Seminary, where he also teaches doctrinal studies. He is also an associate pastor of the Redeemer United Reformed Church of Dyer, Indiana, and the co-editor of the Mid-America Journal of Theology. He and his wife, Nancy, have four children and twelve grandchildren.

Matthew Barrett (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is associate professor of Christian theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including God’s Word Alone; and Owen on the Christian Life; and Reformation Theology.

Product Reviews

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  1. Armando
    Laredo, TX.
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Technical but digestible
    June 20, 2017
    Armando
    Laredo, TX.
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
    Meets Expectations: 0
    This is a collection of essays edited by Matthew Barrett. Foreword by Michael Horton, Contributions by R. Michael Allen, Gerald Bray, Graham A. Cole, Aaron Clay Denlinger, JV Fesko, Eunjin Kim, Douglas F. Kelly, Robert Kolb, Robert Letham, Peter A. Lillback, Korey D. Maas , Donald Macleod, Keith A. Mathison, Michael Reeves, Kim Riddlebarger, Scott R. Swain, Mark D. Thompson, Carl R. Trueman, Cornelis P. Venema, Matthew Barrett. Baptists and Presbyterians Authors, motivated by the celebration of 500 years of reform, the authors present 700 pages with various themes that make up Reformed theology, the content seems more focused on people who have a notion of what reform was historically and the Doctrines that resurged. Readers learn the thinking of historical figures such as Luther, Melanchthon, Calvin, and others. And their contributions on topics such as Union with Christ, Scripture, Justification and Sanctification, etc. Presenting the thinking of the reformers, but also analyzing the doctrines in the technical and academic way may seem a bit tedious reading nonetheless, It is digestible for the voracious reader. It is not so much a systematic theology itself, but a historical theology And for this, it will not only benefit those who consider themselves reformed but also in other traditions. It is a good contribution which will enrich our knowledge in the area of historical theology not only for the pastoral theological library but also for the lay reader pacient.

    In compliance with Federal Trade Commission regulations, I was provided a review copy of this book from Crossway.
  2. contemplativereflections
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Book Review: Reformation Theology
    May 26, 2017
    contemplativereflections
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
    Meets Expectations: 0
    In "Reformation Theology," Matthew Barrett along with a host of reformed scholars offer a summary of the major areas of reformation thought in the sixteenth century. Focusing primarily on the magisterial reformers, the authors paint a vivid picture of the multifaceted dimensions of the theologies of the main reformers such as Luther, Calvin, Bucer, and Melanchthon. However, the authors do also take efforts to interact with the thinking and influences of related parties including the early church fathers, the medieval Roman church, and the radical Reformers along with other reformation movements in England, France, and Scotland. The chapters explore key topics including justification by faith, union with Christ, and the sacraments while also looking at lesser considered areas such as the reformers' views on eschatology and the image of God. Each topic is prefaced by an overview of the historical, social, and theological contours before delving into the core issues. Moreover, instead of examining all the different nuances of each subject, the authors chose to interact with the most influential voices such as Calvin's "Institutes" and the Reformed confessions. In addition to the many useful footnotes at the bottom of each page, there are lengthy lists of primary and secondary resources at the end for readers to access for further information. The one drawback of the book in focusing so narrowly on the first and second generation reformers is that there is substantial amount of informational overlap in the sources and ideas presented among the different chapters. Nevertheless, this book serves as an accessible introduction to both laypeople and students alike as the authors are largely successful in condensing the material to concentrate on the most essential aspects of each topic.

    I would most definitely recommend this book to those who are unfamiliar with the key issues at stake in the Reformation. A good understanding of our Protestant heritage is important for contemporary believers who often are not even familiar with the history of their own denominations. By studying how the reformers worked out doctrinal issues in the sixteenth century, we can gain greater knowledge and perspective in how we can face challenges to those same controversies, albeit in a different form, in the twenty-first century. Furthermore, we can come to a greater appreciation of the massive struggles, tensions, and sacrifices of those who have gone before us to recapture the vital truths of the Christian faith.

    In compliance with Federal Trade Commission regulations, I was provided a review copy of this book from Crossway.
  3. EJ
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent Introduction to Reformation Theology
    April 27, 2017
    EJ
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
    Meets Expectations: 0
    This book is a blessing to the Reformed community. It is a scholarly, yet fairly accessible to laymen, Systematic account of the key theological controversies of the 16th century reformation. It would be a great intro for anyone desiring to begin a historical study to the reformation. It is very sober and conservative in it's interpretation of the primary sources of the reformers. It covers Luther, Melanchthon, Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin, ect. It primarily focuses on the 16th century reformers. I recommend reading it straight through even though it's a fairly large volume. But even after a perusal of the work in it's totality it will nevertheless be a resource of good use for years to come. I highly commend this work to all sons and daughters of the reformation.

    Grace, mercy and peace unto God's elect!
  4. Floyd Johnson
    Upstate NY
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Reformers' Theology
    April 3, 2017
    Floyd Johnson
    Upstate NY
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I was hesitant to agree to review this book. I clearly do not put myself in the reformed church tradition - yet, as a Wesleyan pastor, theology does intrigue me, and I want to understand it as best I can. I was not disappointed.

    In spite of the title, the book is not a theology text, per se. It fits most closely under subject heading historical theology, but it does not quite fit there either. When I consider the topic of historical theology I expect to find the book or paper to follow the development of a theological theme over time - from the original scriptures and early church, to the church fathers, through the middle ages and the reformation, to its current understanding within the church. This book does not do that. Rather, this book takes a snapshot of the broad areas of theological study (from the doctrine of scripture to eschatology) as they were understood during the formative years of the reformation. Written as a series of essay, each dealing with a specific theological topic, the various authors attempt to examine the doctrinal issues through the eyes of major players in the reformation. As an example, let me draw from the Abstract on the essay entitled Sola Scriptura by Mark D. Thompson:

    =====================================================================

    ABSTRACT

    Sola Scriptura is sometimes described as the formal principle of the

    Reformation. Certainly, an appeal to Scripture's final authority is

    a common thread throughout the writings of the major theological

    voices of the Reformation, despite their distinctive emphases an

    particular interests. This chapter examines the thought of Luther,

    Melanchthon, Zwingli, Bullinger, Calvin, and Cranmer on the au-

    thority of Scripture in an attempt to highlight both their common

    perspective and their unique contributions. It also argues that de-

    spite the genuinely revolutionary character of the Reformers' ap-

    Peal to Scripture, it in fact relied on antecedently held convictions

    about the nature of Scripture and its right to determine Christian

    faith and practice.

    ================================================================

    The reader will notice that the author attempts to draw from the thoughts of Luther, Melanchthon, Zwingly, Bullinger, Calvin, and Cranmer. Other writers may draw from a subset of these individuals or extend their writing to include elements of the Counter-Reformation and other contemporaneous groups. Interestingly, Wesleys name is mentioned only once, in the Prologue, which sort of serves as later limit of the books coverage.

    I found the reading to be a bit uneven - the Prologue was very difficult, formal, scholarly; some essays followed the same pattern, while others were more readable by the typical seminary and graduate student. The were still scholarly and well-researched, but not so formal as to hinder the readers understanding. The book was not as a defense of Reformed theology, but as an explanation of the reformer theology at the time they lived. Some authors simply echoed the reformers' ideas, others tried to place those ideas into their cultural settings. Speaking of authors, the only name familiar to this Wesleyan reviewer was that of Michael Horton (who wrote the Prologue) - I expect that this is more a result of this readers background than the quality of the scholars chosen to be part of the project.

    This book does belong on the shelf of all scholars coming out the reformed church or having an interest in historical theology. Having said that, I would recommend the book be read by Christian scholars of all stripes - whether a personal copy or one borrowed from the library. Luther, Melanchthon, Zwingly, Bullinger, Calvin, and Cranmer, each contributed to the protestant reformation in their own way. Understanding that contribution will be important to all of us.

    ______________

    This review is based on a free electronic copy provided by the publisher for the purpose of creating this review. The opinions expressed are my own.
  5. CaseyCovenant
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The best single volume explaining the theology of the Protestant Reformation!
    March 27, 2017
    CaseyCovenant
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book is a gold mine of historical theology and doctrine! Every Protestant Christian and pastor should own a copy!
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