Southeastern Native Peoples & The Trail of Tears

Cherokee, Muscogee, Seminole, Chickasaw, & Choctaw Nations / 1831-1839

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When Soft Rain’s teacher reads a letter stating that as of May 23, 1838, all Cherokee people are to leave their land and move to what many Cherokees called “the land of darkness,” Soft Rain is not concerned. She is confident that her family will not have to move, because they have just planted corn for the next harvest. But when soldiers arrive to take nine-year-old Soft Rain and her mother to walk the Trail of Tears, she must leave the rest of her family behind, journeying across rivers, valleys, and mountains; eating the white man’s food; and watching many of her people die. A story of adversity and resilience during a painful period of American history. 128 pages, softcover.

An exciting, easy-to-read telling of the story of John Ross, the chief of the great Cherokee Nation. John Ross is looking at his home for the last time. All around him, people are loading wagons for the long journey west. The Cherokee people do not want to leave their land, but they have no choice. Today is their first day on the Trail of Tears. Step 5.

The Cornerstones of Freedom series will introduce elementary-age students to the institutions and events that have shaped the United States, from the country's beginning to the current day.

The Trail of Tears covers the buildup to the forced relocation of Native Americans, the terrible conditions they were forced to suffer, the impact on U.S.-Native American relations, and more, through easy-to-understand chapters filled with photographs and interesting sidebars.

These non-fiction books will help students learn to draw information from informational texts; each book features a table of contents, chapters, sidebars, an original map showing people and events, a "setting the scene" spread, "the story continues" closing, "influential individuals" list, timeline, and list of primary sources.

64 pages with index and glossary, softcover. 6.2" x 9". Grades 4-6 / Ages 9-11.

An exciting, easy-to-read telling of the story of John Ross, the chief of the great Cherokee Nation. John Ross is looking at his home for the last time. All around him, people are loading wagons for the long journey west. The Cherokee people do not want to leave their land, but they have no choice. Today is their first day on the Trail of Tears. Step 5.

Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. A thriving metropolis at its height with a population of twenty thousand, a sprawling central plaza, and scores of spectacular earthen mounds, Cahokia gave rise to a new culture that spread across the plains; yet by 1400 it had been abandoned.

In Cahokia, anthropologist Timothy R. Pauketat reveals the story of the city and its people as uncovered by the excavations of American corn-belt archaeologists. These digs have revealed evidence of a powerful society, including complex celestial timepieces, the remains of feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of large-scale human sacrifice.

Drawing on these pioneering digs and a wealth of analysis by historians and archaeologists, Pauketat provides a comprehensive picture of what's been discovered about Cahokia and how these findings have challenged our perceptions of Native Americans. A lively read and a compelling narrative of prehistoric America.

This beautifully illustrated book is a "Robert F. Sibert Honor Book", and is filled with stark, colorful drawings of Sequoyah, the Cherokee people and land. The story of an illiterate man who invented the Cherokee written language, the text is fittingly written in both English and Cherokee. Sequoyah celebrates literacy, and the struggle of a people to stand tall and proud. 29 pages, hardcover with dust jacket.

    Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. A thriving metropolis at its height with a population of twenty thousand, a sprawling central plaza, and scores of spectacular earthen mounds, Cahokia gave rise to a new culture that spread across the plains; yet by 1400 it had been abandoned.

    In Cahokia, anthropologist Timothy R. Pauketat reveals the story of the city and its people as uncovered by the excavations of American corn-belt archaeologists. These digs have revealed evidence of a powerful society, including complex celestial timepieces, the remains of feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of large-scale human sacrifice.

    Drawing on these pioneering digs and a wealth of analysis by historians and archaeologists, Pauketat provides a comprehensive picture of what's been discovered about Cahokia and how these findings have challenged our perceptions of Native Americans. A lively read and a compelling narrative of prehistoric America.