Do We Need the New Testament?: Letting the Old Testament Speak for Itself - eBook
Do We Need the New Testament?: Letting the Old Testament Speak for Itself - eBook  -     By: John E. Goldingay
Buy Item $9.99 Retail: $18.99 Save 47% ($9.00)
In Stock
Stock No: WW77355EB
IVP Academic / 2015 / ePub
Add To Cart


Add To Wishlist
Add To Cart


Wishlist

Do We Need the New Testament?: Letting the Old Testament Speak for Itself - eBook

IVP Academic / 2015 / ePub

In Stock
Stock No: WW77355EB


Have questions about eBooks? Check out our eBook FAQs.

* This product is available for purchase worldwide.
  • Other Formats (2)
Other Formats (2)
Description
Availability
Price
Add
Include
  1. In Stock
    $9.99
    Retail: $18.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $9.99
  2. In Stock
    $11.49
    Retail: $22.00
    Add To Cart
    $11.49

Product Information

Format: DRM Free ePub
Vendor: IVP Academic
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN-13: 9780830898473

Publisher's Description

Do we need the Old Testament? That's a familiar question, often asked. But as an Old Testament scholar, John Goldingay turns that question on its head: Do we need the New Testament? What's new about the New Testament? After all, the Old Testament was the only Bible Jesus and the disciples knew. Jesus affirmed it as the Word of God. Do we need anything more? And what happens when we begin to look at the Old Testament, which is the First Testament, not as a deficient old work in need of a christological makeover, but as a rich and splendid revelation of God's faithfulness to Israel and the world? In this cheerfully provocative yet probingly serious book, John Goldingay sets the question and views it from a variety of angles. Under his expert hand, each facet unfolds the surprising richness of the Old Testament and challenges us to recalibrate our perspective on it.

Author Bio

John Goldingay (PhD, University of Nottingham; DD, Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth) is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He was previously principal and a professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at St John’s Theological College in Nottingham, England. His books include , , , and commentaries on Psalms, Isaiah, and Daniel. He has also authored the three-volume and the seventeen-volume Old Testament For Everyone series. Goldingay also serves in pastoral ministry as an associate pastor at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Pasadena. He holds membership in the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society for Old Testament Study, and serves on the Task Force on Biblical Interpretation in the Anglican Communion and the editorial board for the Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies.

Endorsements

Reflecting on new perspectives on the life of Jesus, issues of Psalm 137, the role of church and state and their ethics, and the hermeneutics of theological interpretation, the reader will enjoy the questioning and provocative mind of John Goldingay as he takes up his laptop to challenge much of today's conventional Christian wisdom.
-Richard S. Hess,
Earl S. Kalland Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages, Denver Seminary

The early church's problem with the Old Testament was completely different to ours. Their problem was not how to make sense of the Old Testament given the coming of Jesus, but the reverse: Given that the Old Testament is God's revelation, how do we make sense of Jesus? With this unusual question, Do We Need the New Testament?, Goldingay turns our modern thinking on its head and exposes the weaknesses in the way contemporary Christians understand the Old Testament - and the New. With thought-provoking ideas on every page, this book will help readers look at the Old and New Testaments in new and exciting ways.
-Nathan MacDonald,
lecturer in Hebrew Bible and fellow of St. John's College, University of Cambridge

John Goldingay is incapable of being uninteresting. I smiled approvingly at many passages in this book and grimaced at a few others, all the while deeply grateful for such a passionate dismantling of pernicious but widely held myths about the Old Testament's theological inferiority. If Goldingay does not quite come to grips with what makes the New Testament new, he nevertheless brilliantly illustrates how the Old Testament is already good news on its own.
-Stephen B. Chapman,
associate professor of Old Testament, Duke University

A fresh, accessible and at times provocative explanation of the enduring relevance of the Old ('First') Testament for Christians. It will challenge readers to embrace the first seventy percent of the canon as truly Christian Scripture.
-Mark J. Boda,
professor of Old Testament, McMaster Divinity College, professor, faculty of Theology, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

Editorial Reviews

"A fresh, accessible and at times provocative explanation of the enduring relevance of the Old ('First') Testament for Christians. It will challenge readers to embrace the first seventy percent of the canon as truly Christian Scripture."
"[Goldingay's] tome is a breath of fresh air. It is well-written, thoughtful, and thought-provoking and should be required reading for those preaching and teaching. I once met a pastor who made what he thought was a laudatory comment: 'I never preach from the Old Testament since I want to bring people to Jesus.' Goldingay's book is the necessary prescription for this theological life-threatening illness."
"Goldingay offers a solid case against the theological inferiority of the OT. Do We Need the New Testament? is a welcome corrective for those insisting that the OT does not speak to Christians today. The book would be a great addition to the library of seminary students, pastors, and informed lay people."
"A short, interesting, readable, and provocative book for everyone concerned with how to read the Old [First] Testament as Christians without reducing it into an allegory of Christian beliefs."
" Do We Need the New Testament? offers a much-needed corrective to the tendency to neglect or devalue the OT found in much of the contemporary church. The book would be of great value to any theological student, pastor, or interested layperson who desires to explore the rich theological, spiritual, and ethical resources that the OT has to offer the church or who seeks to gain a better grasp of the relationship between the Testaments. Readers can expect to have their assumptions challenged, their minds informed, and their passion for the OT (re)ignited by Goldingay's insightful and engaging discussion, which pairs penetrating analysis with a fervent love for Israel's Scriptures."
"Bible readers who want to think through the relationship between the two testaments and its implications, and who would welcome help from an insightful and outspoken debate partner, should read and ponder this book."
"With its scholarly tone, this title should be recommended to laypeople, students, and pastors who are familiar with Greek, Hebrew, and Latin and have a knowledge of biblical and secular history."
"All in all, this book is a delightful, stimulating, and challenging read. . . . Goldingay helps to explain how to interpret and understand the Old Testament's abiding theological witness to our triune God."
"John Goldingay is incapable of being uninteresting. I smiled approvingly at many passages in this book and grimaced at a few others, all the while deeply grateful for such a passionate dismantling of pernicious but widely held myths about the Old Testament's theological inferiority. If Goldingay does not quite come to grips with what makes the New Testament new, he nevertheless brilliantly illustrates how the Old Testament is already good news on its own."
"The early church's problem with the Old Testament was completely different to ours. Their problem was not how to make sense of the Old Testament given the coming of Jesus, but the reverse: Given that the Old Testament is God's revelation, how do we make sense of Jesus? With this unusual question, Do We Need the New Testament?, Goldingay turns our modern thinking on its head and exposes the weaknesses in the way contemporary Christians understand the Old Testament—and the New. With thought-provoking ideas on every page, this book will help readers look at the Old and New Testaments in new and exciting ways."
"Reflecting on new perspectives on the life of Jesus, issues of Psalm 137, the role of church and state and their ethics, and the hermeneutics of theological interpretation, the reader will enjoy the questioning and provocative mind of John Goldingay as he takes up his laptop to challenge much of today's conventional Christian wisdom."
"The academic content will especially please scholars and students. All readers will enjoy the engaging tone and intriguing premise."

Product Reviews

3 Stars Out Of 5
3 out of 5
(0)
(0)
(1)
(0)
(0)
Quality:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
Value:
4 out Of 5
(4 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4 out Of 5
(4 out of 5)
100%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
SORT BY:
SEE:
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1
  1. Jimmy Reagan
    Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Well Written Study That I Could Not Agree With!
    June 3, 2015
    Jimmy Reagan
    Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    We must applaud volumes that encourage us to see the Old Testament in all its splendor. Too many push it back to secondary status. Enter Old Testament scholar John Goldingay who makes his attempt to shake up our thinking on the subject. His aim is letting the Old Testament speak for itself.

    There are pluses and minuses in this volume for sure. The author writes well, knows the scholarly issues out there, and can be quite thought provoking. His chapter on The Costly Loss Of First Testament Spirituality, for example, covered several trains on thought that I had never thought of, particularly on the Psalms and worship.

    There were also chapters, like chapter four on Grand and a Middle Narratives, that I simply could not get on with. Perhaps that says more about me as a reviewer than him as a writerI am not sure.

    I imagine some will love this book and rate it highly, but for me it was marred by his suppositions that led him far afield. He has so little regard for the historicity of the Bible, thinks books like Jonah and Ruth must be fictional, and his claims of their abiding value are undermined by his view of dating. His ideas of memory may be a trendy, new scholarly view, but it seems bizarre to me.

    His last chapter fails completely in how it deals with Christology in the Old Testament, and I believe a majority of Christianity would think so. I will be curious to read future reviews. I will be curious, too, with his being such an influential scholar what will come of his discussion. He did at least succeed in making you feel he loved the Old Testament. You will have to check this one out and decide for yourself.

    I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255.
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1

Ask a Question

Find Related Products

Author/Artist Review

Back
×
Back
×

Ask a Question

What would you like to know about this product? Please enter your name, your email and your question regarding the product in the fields below, and we'll answer you in the next 24-48 hours.

If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.