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  1. NBBC, 1 & 2 Samuel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition
    NBBC, 1 & 2 Samuel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition
    Kevin Mellish
    Beacon Hill Press / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $21.99 Retail: $29.99 Save 27% ($8.00)
    3 Stars Out Of 5 1 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    Stock No: WW127210
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  1. Safford, AZ
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Skims over the most difficult passages
    January 19, 2017
    Neil
    Safford, AZ
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 3
    I have to say that I am a little bit disappointed with this commentary. It does add clarity and may be useful for preparing sermons and classes; but the commentator brushes aside passages that really have are of Wesleyan interest.

    For example, Much can be gleaned from the fact that God regretted making Saul king (1 Samuel 15:10). Mellish barely acknowledges that God regretted something.

    A few verses later, the Biblical author reports that God "is not a mortal, that he should change his mind" (1 Samuel 15:29). That claim needs comment since the whole chapter is an example of God making a BIG change of mind. Mellish makes no comment about it. Why not? I cannot say.

    In 2 Samuel 16:23, Absalom has sex with David's concubines. Mellish does address the significance of Absalom's act; but he does not talk about this act possibly being a fulfillment of a judgment voiced by Nathan against David (2 Samuel 12:11). Was it a fulfillment or some other happenstance?

    At the place of Nathan's judgment, Mellish reports simply that later on "Absalom had intercourse with David's concubines...." So Mellish is going with the assumption that Absalom fulfilled Nathan's judgment in 2 Samuel 12:11. I think the judgment against David needs more explanation, especially from a Wesleyan perspective. Was it God's doing that Absalom did what he did? Did God cause the trouble in David's house? Apparently, there was a death judgment included in what Nathan said, for when David humbled himself, Nathan said, "Now the LORD has put away your sin; you shall not die." Is it possible that some of the other judgments were also rescinded? That whole section is kind of difficult for a Wesleyan. Mellish should have slowed down a bit there and commented more.
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