NBBC, 1 & 2 Samuel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition
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Beacon Hill Press / 2011 / Paperback
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NBBC, 1 & 2 Samuel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition

Beacon Hill Press / 2011 / Paperback

In Stock
CBD Stock No: WW127210


Product Description

* Explore the Old Testament Books of 1 & 2 Samuel from a Wesleyan perspective. Ideal for pastors, scholars, teachers, and students, this readable reference features informative introductory material; clear verse-by-verse explanations based on the original language; comprehensive annotations; helpful sidebars focusing on theological issues, word meanings, archaeological connections, and other topics; and an expanded bibliography. 288 pages, softcover.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 304
Vendor: Beacon Hill Press
Publication Date: 2011
Dimensions: 9.00 X 6.00 (inches)
ISBN: 0834127210
ISBN-13: 9780834127210
Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary

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Publisher's Description

The New Beacon Bible Commentary is an engaging, indispensable reference tool to aid individuals in every walk of life in the study and meditation of God’s Word. Written from the Wesleyan theological perspective, it offers insight and perceptive scholarship to help you unlock the deeper truths of Scripture and garner an awareness of the history, culture, and context attributed to each book of study. Readable, relevant, and academically thorough, it offers scholars, pastors, and laity a new standard for understanding and interpreting the Bible in the 21st century.Each volume features:Completely New Scholarship from notable experts in the Wesleyan traditionConvenient Introductory Material for each book of the Bible including information on authorship, date, history, audience, sociological/cultural issues, purpose, literary features, theological themes, hermeneutical issues, and moreClear Verse-by-Verse Explanations, which offer a contemporary, Wesleyan-based understanding derived from the passage’s original languageComprehensive Annotation divided into three sections, which cover background elements behind the text; verse-by-verse details and meanings found in the text; and significance, relevance, intertextuality, and application from the textHelpful Sidebars, which provide deeper insight into theological issues, word meanings, archeological connections, historical relevance, cultural customs, and moreExpanded Bibliography for further study of historical elements, additional interpretations, and theological themesThe books of Samuel constitute an important part of the larger literacy work that extends from Joshua through Kings, which modern scholars refer to as the Deuteronomistic History. These books provide a vital literary and historical link in the Bible’s overall presentation of Israel’s past.

Author Bio

Dr. Kevin Mellish has taught biblical literature at Olivet Nazarene University since 2004. Dr. Mellish holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Olivet Nazarene University, a Master of Divinity degree from Nazarene Theological Seminary, and a Masters and Doctor of Philosophy degree from Claremont Graduate University. Previously, he served in the Ontario-Montclair School District and as an associate pastor at Ontario First Church of the Nazarene. His research interests have focused on the life of David, the development of Israelite faith and religion, the Deuteronomistic History, Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern history, and the Pentateuch.

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  1. Neil
    Safford, AZ
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Skims over the most difficult passages
    January 19, 2017
    Neil
    Safford, AZ
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 3
    I have to say that I am a little bit disappointed with this commentary. It does add clarity and may be useful for preparing sermons and classes; but the commentator brushes aside passages that really have are of Wesleyan interest.

    For example, Much can be gleaned from the fact that God regretted making Saul king (1 Samuel 15:10). Mellish barely acknowledges that God regretted something.

    A few verses later, the Biblical author reports that God "is not a mortal, that he should change his mind" (1 Samuel 15:29). That claim needs comment since the whole chapter is an example of God making a BIG change of mind. Mellish makes no comment about it. Why not? I cannot say.

    In 2 Samuel 16:23, Absalom has sex with David's concubines. Mellish does address the significance of Absalom's act; but he does not talk about this act possibly being a fulfillment of a judgment voiced by Nathan against David (2 Samuel 12:11). Was it a fulfillment or some other happenstance?

    At the place of Nathan's judgment, Mellish reports simply that later on "Absalom had intercourse with David's concubines...." So Mellish is going with the assumption that Absalom fulfilled Nathan's judgment in 2 Samuel 12:11. I think the judgment against David needs more explanation, especially from a Wesleyan perspective. Was it God's doing that Absalom did what he did? Did God cause the trouble in David's house? Apparently, there was a death judgment included in what Nathan said, for when David humbled himself, Nathan said, "Now the LORD has put away your sin; you shall not die." Is it possible that some of the other judgments were also rescinded? That whole section is kind of difficult for a Wesleyan. Mellish should have slowed down a bit there and commented more.
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