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    1. 4 Stars Out Of 5
      A Well Rounded Commentary
      June 16, 2017
      The Geeky Calvinist
      Quality: 5
      Value: 5
      Meets Expectations: 5
      Luke, is an New Testament commentary, written by John T. Carroll published by Westminster John Knox Press. This commentary is one of the most well written volumes in the New Testament Library Commentary, a series which is synonymous with thought provoking critical scholarship, this volume continues this legacy. While Carroll is no stranger to Biblical commentaries this is his first foray into this renowned commentary series.

      Luke, begins with the typical study into the introductory matters of this book of the Bible, yet while introductions are common; this introduction is atypical of most commentaries. It is not that this work does dive into history and recent scholarship which Carroll, does a phenomenal job of rather; it is the thoroughness that he takes with these introductory matters which makes this commentary atypical. In a day where these matters are either glossed over to get to the exegesis of the text or are so cumbersome that they become useless, Carroll though has found a good balance in being thorough, communicating depth and attention to recent scholarship, without losing the forest in the trees. In reference to the commentary section on the text of this Gospel, Carroll takes great care in carefully showing the original context of passage while applying it directly to the modern day reader.

      With regard of recommending Luke, to others I would recommend this commentary to scholarly students of scripture. By this I mean I recommend this work to Pastors, Scholars, Bible Teachers, Bible College Students, and Seminary Students, there is enough academic weight to this text to understand a particularly issue in the text while giving aid to pastors in preaching the text. For a Pastor who is more on the conservative side I would recommend this commentary in tandem with a commentary which examines the Gospel of Luke from said point of view.

      This book was provided to me free of charge from Westminster John Knox Publishing in exchange for an unbiased, honest review.

      Luke: A Commentary: The New Testament Library

      2012 by John T. Carroll

      Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

      Page Count: 560 Pages

      ISBN: 978-0664221065
    2. Leesville, SC
      Age: 45-54
      Gender: male
      5 Stars Out Of 5
      Helpful!
      March 16, 2017
      Jimmy Reagan
      Leesville, SC
      Age: 45-54
      Gender: male
      Quality: 5
      Value: 5
      Meets Expectations: 5
      This commentary is a fairly recent entry in the well-known New Testament Library (NTL) series. Before I received this book, I had heard reports that it was one of the most practical volumes in the series for pastors. Now that Ive had a chance to get into it, I must agree. Its a quality midsize commentary for the Gospel of Luke.

      After an extensive bibliography, Mr. Carroll gets into his Introduction on Lukes Gospel. Though rather brief, I felt it covered all the bases well. In fact, it might be the length that many pastors would prefer. He begins by explaining Lukes impressive qualities, including he says, Christian historian, gifted storyteller, literary artist, and theologian. He sees Luke is drawing the picture of Jesus within the Roman world. As you will find in most such commentaries, he outlines what has been believed about Luke being the author of this gospel. He dates Lukes gospel later than I would. He discusses genre and purpose followed by the suggested approach to reading Lukes Gospel. He feels that Luke applies his story to Israels story. He sees Lukes gospel as the theocentric and says, what drives the story as Gods faithful commitment and relentless activity to accomplish the divine purpose for Israel, and through Israel for all people. Finally, after discussing textual issues of the Gospel of Luke, he gets into the design of the narrative, which covers issues of structure. All in all, its an introduction well done.

      The commentary itself was well done. He brought in appropriate background material, defined the meaning of words, and did lose track of the narrative flow of the gospel of Luke. Every passage I checked had meaningful, helpful commentary that you could appreciate. In fact, I compared some passages to what I had read in some of my favorite larger exegetical commentaries, and Mr. Carroll had something worthwhile to share in every passage. This is a good resource to add to your shelves.
    3. Michigan
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: Male
      5 Stars Out Of 5
      An Excellent Commentary on Luke
      December 8, 2015
      John M Kight
      Michigan
      Age: 25-34
      Gender: Male
      Quality: 5
      Value: 5
      Meets Expectations: 5
      John T. Carroll is the Harriet Robertson Fitts Memorial Professor of New Testament and Director of the Program for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Union Presbyterian Seminary. Carrol received an M.Div. and Ph.D. in New Testament Studies from Princeton Theological Seminary, and has since spent the bulk of his academic career primarily within the arena of Lukan studies. Carroll authored and/or edited a number of books, including, Response to the End of History: Eschatology and Situation in Luke-Acts (1998), The Death of Jesus in Early Christianity (1995), The Return of Jesus in Early Christianity (2000), and The Word in This World: Essays in New Testament Exegesis and Theology (2004). Carroll has also published a long list of articles on Luke-Acts and various topics within New Testament Studies. Most recently, Carroll has contributed this present commentary, a good-sized volume on the Gospel of Luke, released as part of the critically acclaimed New Testament Library series: Luke: A Commentary

      Carroll is a fairly well-known scholarly voice within the world of New Testament and Lukan studies, and this commentary visibly parades his expertise. The commentary begins with a bibliography of up-to-date commentaries, monographs, books, and essays related to the Gospel of Luke. If you enjoy these sections, peruse them often, and are well acquainted with Luke-Acts material this section will be reviewable and up-to-date, but far from comprehensive. If none of the above describes your interest, then you can rest assured that Carroll has at least provided a solid and current bibliography of the Third Gospel to catapult your studies. Subsequently, Carroll provides the reader with a useful introduction. Carroll briefly surveys the traditional introductory categories (i.e. authorship, date, purpose, etc.), and addresses how to approach the reading of the Third Gospel and previews the central theological and ethical concerns and commitments therein. The reader will find the introductory section to be a goldmine of helpful information for interacting with Carroll in the commentary ahead. It is an essential and recommended first stop.

      The commentary itself is wrought with exegetical and theological insight. Carroll is excellent when it understanding the literary themes and intertextuality within the Gospel of Luke. Each section in the commentary is based on the authors original translation of the Greek text and littered with textual notes. Carroll follows closely with the textual basis of the NA28 and notes clearly when he favors alternative readings. Interestingly, in a number of sections in the commentary Carroll favors the shorter readings attested by the Western text, especially Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis (D). This is seen in his commentary and translation of several verses within Luke 22 and 24. For example, Carroll does not find Luke 22:43-44 original, but provides a lengthy textual note detailing his decision (p. 444). Because of the flexible text choice within the commentary, many readers will be reluctant to engage Carrolls work. But this would be an unwarranted endeavor. If anything this should provide added value to your library.

      Still the textual decisions may not be the only hindrance for the conservative reader. Carroll affirms Luke as the author, but neglects to affirm traditional Lukan authorship. In other words, Carroll names Luke as the author but is unwilling to tell affirm that the Luke writing the gospel is the individual traditionally understood to be the author (p. 2). Moreover, Carroll is comfortable dating the Third Gospel well into the early second century (75-125 CE). This assertion is largely based on his assumption that Luke consulted the Gospel of Mark (a fair assumption), and that Mark is dated around 70 CE. Therefore, Luke would have had to consult Mark sometime after 70 CE. The problem most will recognize is that there is no real difficulty dating Mark in the mid-50s. In other words, Luke could have still consulted Mark and completed his gospel account by the early 60s. Many conservative scholars have argued this point well and in much more depth. But, similar to the textual issue in the prior paragraph, to overlook interaction with Carroll because of these disagreements would be nave and unwarranted.

      Luke: A Commentary is an up-to-date examination of one of the most significant accounts of the person and work of Jesus Christ in all of Scripture. John T. Carroll has provided a well-researched presentation of the current conversation among New Testament scholars, and added additional ground with his sensitivity to literary themes and intertextuality. Carrolls translation and textual notes are indispensable, and his selective favoritism of Codex Bezae is interesting and helpful for the trained reader. If you are looking for a strong commentary on the Gospel of Luke from a critical perspective, then John T. Carroll has provided you with a commentary that cannot be overlooked. It will be off my bookshelf often.

      I received a review copy of these books in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
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