1. The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own
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    The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own
    Joshua Becker
    WaterBrook / 2018 / Trade Paperback
    $12.49 Retail: $17.00 Save 27% ($4.51)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 5 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    Stock No: WW427977
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  1. Lancaster, NY
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    The More Of Less
    June 8, 2016
    dyand
    Lancaster, NY
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The More Of Less, Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own by Joshua Becker, creator of BecomingMinimalist.com. Although in the long-run I did enjoy the book very much, I felt as if it started out on the slow side - so don't give up if you feel the same when you read it. It did take me several chapters to get into it as the beginning of the book deals with a lot of the background and how the whole process came about; but once I got into the actual procedures portion - it was very informative and enjoyable and I found myself taking notes as I read. It discusses the reasons we accumulate things (security, success, acceptance, and others) and the how and why we can reduce the amount of items we own and actually feel more free than we might feel right now - having more time, more money and more energy. It was interesting to learn that we use 20% of our things 80% of the time, the other 80%, we use 20% of the time.

    The book gives you detailed instructions and various ways in which we can reduce our surplus. It allows you to start small if that is what you need - go through one drawer, one box, one closet, one room. One idea is to separate our items into various categories (donate, sell, recycle, toss) and then actually follow through with removing the items from our homes. It offers great ideas as to ways in which to get rid of the items - places I would have never thought to check into, should you choose not to sell all your items. It discusses how to deal with the items that we are not sure we want to get rid of, breaking it down into stages we can follow - until we are sure we want to let go of the item. It does not come across as putting you down if you are not ready for these measures, or making you feel like a hoarder; as a matter of fact, it discusses the fact that this process is not for everyone.

    There are great ideas that take you beyond just de-cluttering your life. Joshua Becker gives you information based on tried and true situations which he and his family experienced - and also shares the experiences of people he has met on his journey. You will learn not only the best way to handle your surplus, but how you can invest the money you are now saving, grow your giving, and invest your time. This book goes well beyond just telling you how to reduce your clutter (and a lot of items which are NOT clutter) and helps you to realize that we do not need to fill our lives with things - that there are much more important things involved here.

    I found "me" in many of these pages, especially when he discussed having a hard time letting go of items with sentimental attachments - how you can still keep part of your memories and bless others with the surplus. I very much liked the numerous options of what to do with everything - there is pretty much an idea for just about every mindset - all with the same end result: An easier lifestyle for you to enjoy and appreciating the items you do have.

    I received this book free from Water Brook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
  2. Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Greater Pursuits than Material Possessions
    May 2, 2016
    brotherjoel
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 0
    Value: 0
    Meets Expectations: 0
    Joshua Becker provides a concrete vision for living a countercultural lifestyle in "The More of Less." He challenges readers to consider the life of the minimalist, to turn their back on the call of materialism and live a life free of the trappings that come from over accumulation. Becker's goal in writing this text is to provide people with the freedom to live out their dreams. He challenges people to dream big and then encourages us to give up our pursuit of stuff in order to see our dreams realized.

    He uses many personal examples as well as stories of other minimilists to make his point. One of the most inspirational stories is his own. He and his wife have formed a non-profit organization called The Hope Effect, which seeks to provide two parent homes to orphans. The founding of this organization became possible because of the minimalist lifestyle that Becker, along with his family, adopted. Without the resources saved through living as minimilists, Joshua Becker and his wife could never have realized the dream of founding The Hope Effect.

    In challenging readers to pursue this lifestyle, Becker provides many steps that allow people to adopt minimalism. He explores many ideas from starting small to looking at the areas that are hardest for people. Some areas will be easier for some readers than others. For instance, I could easily give up some of my clothing. As I read, I mentally went through my closet and realized that while everything still fits, there are many things I have not worn since I graduated college 18 years ago. Clothing is easy. Books on the other hand, when Becker wrote that he took three bookshelves down to one I balked. Books would be a challenge area for me as I have a deep love for them and can see the potential in many of my books for research, growth, and furthering my career. Others, of course, are just for entertainment. An area that I am inspired to look at more closely is paper clutter. Becker makes the point that we do not need paper records as most stuff is available on-line. We just need to go through stuff and get rid of the excess.

    I have not made the decision to become a minimalist, but it is a lifestyle I could begin approaching. I challenge people to read this book and consider its message. If you yourself do not choose the lifestsyle of minimalism, perhaps, like me, you could discover areas where you could embrace minimalist principles.

    I received this book as a review copy from Multnomah Publishing Group's Blogging for Books program.
  3. Belton, TX
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: Female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Worth Adding to Your Collection
    April 30, 2016
    Janet
    Belton, TX
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: Female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Because I've seen Joshua Becker's blog about minimalist living, I was curious to read his book, "The More of Less." I wasn't disappointed. In this book (and on his blog), Becker helps readers understand why cluttered lives are less productive. He tells what prompted him to begin removing things from his life that did not add value or meet a need. He tells readers how to begin the process of evaluating their belongings carefully to get rid of anything that is keeping them from enjoying a more productive life. He tells them how to maintain this lifestyle, how to encourage family members to support them or to join them, and how to use the money and time they gain in more responsible and fulfilling ways. The book is insightful, practical, and inspirational. Even readers who don't feel called to a minimalist lifestyle to the extent that Becker and others mentioned in the book have been will find motivation and practical ideas for removing some of the clutter from their lives, perhaps in some surprising and unexpected places.

    This book was definitely worth my time, and I happily recommend it to you. I thank Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers for sending a complimentary copy in exchange for this review.
  4. Indian Trail, NC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The More of Less
    April 28, 2016
    Michael
    Indian Trail, NC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    "The More of Less" by Joshua Becker is a great read for anyone wanting a simpler lifestyle, namely, through learning to live with less material possessions. The book is around 215 pages and addresses topics such as:

    1. Benefits and misconceptions of the minimalist lifestyle.

    2. 7 questions to ask in clarifying your goals.

    3. Valuing possessions too much leads to valuing relationships too little.

    4. Using the 80-20 rule for going through your home.

    5. Suggestions for going from room to room.

    6. Suggestions for giving away and keeping books.

    7. Using the principles of leveling and experimentation for reducing household items.

    8. How to get your family involved.

    9. Advantages of giving items away to charities instead of trying to sell them.

    10. Suggestions for having a more restful and less busy schedule, taking care of our bodies, and having healthier relationships.

    The title is very readable and the author shares his own experiences and that of others in the quest for having a simpler lifestyle. The narrative flows smoothly and easily transitions from chapter to chapter. Will be an excellent future reference. Recommended.
  5. Prospect,KY
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Dealing with clutter
    March 24, 2016
    Cheryl
    Prospect,KY
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I don't know about you but there are times where I just look in portions of my house and wonder how in the world I ever thought I needed so much "stuff". Is it the pleasure of shopping and buying? Is it not remembering what I even have and think I need another ______? Am I trying in vain to fill a hole God put in every human being that only He can fill? It probably is all those things. But you know what, all that "stuff" may bring a brief moment of what might be termed as happiness but is it really? It truly only results in the need to reorganize, needing a bigger house or storage, or the desire for even more "stuff". The organizer industry must rake in millions a year but does organization really solve the problem? No!

    Joshua Becker addresses my pitfalls and gives ever reader practical tips and stories on how to overcome our bad habit of accumulation, even encouraging us to live a more minimalized life without all the piles upon piles of books, paper, keepsakes, and other possessions in order to enjoy life more fully by choosing adventures and experiences and chasing your dreams. You won't find any magic recipe that immediately wipe away years of acquiring but perhaps you will find a way to begin to change your thinking to a more minimalistic mindset and away from the me-centeredness of ownership. Easy to read and practical. I must admit that this may be a book I need to mark up and revisit again and again since 50 year habits are hard to break. It would seem that the younger generation does this much better than I.

    For me--a must read. If you find yourself dealing with some of the same, pick up this practical guide. I did receive this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I was in no way obligated to write a positive one. Off now to make a step by step plan for minimalizing my own stuff filled life.
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