1. How Do We Know the Bible Is True? Volume 1
    How Do We Know the Bible Is True? Volume 1
    Master Books / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $11.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 20% ($3.00)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 15 Reviews
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    Stock No: WW516331
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  1. North Carolina
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    A good starting point
    February 12, 2013
    Kristenph
    North Carolina
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    How Do We Know the Bible is True? is a compilation of treatises on difficult topics by various authors. It was edited by Ken Ham and Bodie Hodge and published by Master Books, a division of New Leaf Publishing Group.

    When I ordered the book, I thought it was going to be a whole book that focused on proving the truth of the Bible. It is in a broad sense, but delves into a variety of different subtopics. Some of the chapter titles include:

    Is the Old Testment Reliable?

    Did the Physical Resurrection of Christ Really Happen?

    Did Moses Write Genesis?

    Did Miracles Really Happen?

    All of those topics do deal with the broad subject of the authority of Scripture, but explore the arguments for and against the each of the questions.

    I found the book interesting, but it wasn't the type of book I can read straight though. (That's part of the reason for the LONG delay in this review.) I think it is particularly helpful in pointing out the reasons someone might disagree with the Bible's authority. I have a rather conservative upcoming and still hold to a literal interpretation of scriptures. (For those that are supposed to be literal anyway. Some of the Bible is obviously figurative language. The question for the ages is which is which.) I do think this book helped me to see some of the arguments for different interpretations and also why I do not agree with them.

    I do not think this would be a good book to hand to a non-Christian to prove to them the Bible is true. I'm not sure that actually exists, but this book is definitely written with a believer in mind. It's meant to strengthen existing faith and provide information to help a Christian to defend his faith.

    I would recommend this book to others and plan to have my 9th grade son read it. He is always asking difficult questions and I think this book will help to answer some of them.

    Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book for the purpose of this review. I was not compensated for this review.
  2. KS
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Informative but dry at times
    July 13, 2012
    Homeschoolin Mama
    KS
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 3
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    How Do We Know the Bible is True? General Editors Ken Ham & Bodie Hodge along with 15 other writers (Master Books) is an Apologetic style book that contains essays on over 20 relevant topics on questions that are often asked. I must admit that I had a hard time getting into the first couple of chapters, at times it was way over my head, however I was able to get the gist of what was being said. I was only able to read this book a few pages at a time due to trying to absorb all the information and input from the various authors. Also once you get use to one writers style, you are on to another writer and getting use to their style of writing. Some were engaging while others leaned toward the dry side. Personally, I feel that this book would be good for a High School or College student interested in Biblical Theology. I did find certain parts interesting like How to Properly View Evidence by Ken Ham, What is Wrong with Atheism by Jason Lisle, Evolution - The Anti-Science? also by Jason Lisle, Is the Perpetual Virginity of Mary a Biblical View? by Bodie Hodge, and Polygamy in the Light of Scripture by Roger Patterson (this topic was especially interesting to me given all the recent TV programs covering this topic). I plan to put this book in our home library and have it available to my son when he is older as a reference type book. I do like that the Bible is referred to through out the book, to back up what the author is saying.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from New Leaf Publishing Group's blogging for books program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 225: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  3. Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    A Book Our Children Need Before They Leave Home
    May 29, 2012
    Jimmy Reagan
    Leesville, SC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    It's not academic analysis but real life that confronts us in "How Do We Know The Bible Is True? Volume 1″, edited by Ken Ham and Brodie Hodge. Yes, it passes the academic test, but it wants us to be able to face an antagonistic world. It addresses the questions the world is asking Christians today. Not only do we have little effect on a world for which we have no answers, but these are the type of questions that pull our children away from Christianity.

    The chapters are 28 relevant questions answered by various authors. The first one had me hooked as it answered the question "How Do We Know The Bible Is True?" How would you answer that question? We might answer "by faith", but that means nothing to the non-Christian. Here and at other places in the book the laws of logic are brought to bear. What could be better in a world that says we believe the Bible against reason. Find out here that though faith will never be taken out of the equation, our belief is not against reason!

    In chapters on the reliability of the Old and New Testament we get answers (really good answers) to questions Christian young folks hear on college campuses or at the workplace. I heard these things attacked when I went to the University of Tennessee several years ago and I had to dig hard. I want my children to read this before they get in such a situation. I saw others then have their faith crumble as they had no answers to such things. But there are answers, and this book lays them out beautifully.

    Some questions are not as critical as others-like the 3 days of Christ in the Tomb and so which day was Christ crucified on, or issues like polygamy. Others are great! People throw up Bible contradictions, or who wrote Genesis, or how to view evidence. In several places you will learn that carbon dating doesn't prove a thing because of the assumptions made, that the assumption of uniformity is not legitimate on the part of evolutionists, or best of all, the strongest arguments that evolutionists make is only possible if God exists. You've got to read about that great fact.

    I highly recommend this book. If Christian young people mastered the contents of this book, far fewer of them would drift away. May the Lord use this book to that end.

    I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 .
  4. Avery's Creek, NC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent apologetics tool
    May 21, 2012
    Daniel Mount
    Avery's Creek, NC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    How Do We Know the Bible is True? Volume 1 is, at heart, an apologetics book. It seeks to equip Christians to defend the faith. Eighteen authors contribute twenty-eight chapters covering a broad variety of apologetics-related issues.

    Issues core to the faith, like the reliability of the Old and New Testaments, and the doctrine of the Trinity are also covered. But these chapters are interspersed with more focused, niche chapters. To say that the book is deeply diverse and varied is perhaps an understatement; a chapter on hermeneutics sits next to a chapter on the Da Vinci Code, and a chapter on the moral incoherence of evolution sits next to a chapter on polygamy. Many books must be read consecutively to be understood; it is entirely possible that this book is better understood if not read consecutively!

    However, that is not to say that a consecutive reading of the book is a strain. While there may be a certain logic to grouping big-picture topics and focused, niche topics into their own sections, alternating between focused and broad topics actually offers a rather pleasant change of pace.

    Naturally, given the life-work of the editors, a number of the chapters focus on defending the Bible's account of Creation. But with chapters on polygamy, the doctrine of the Trinity, the Da Vinci Code, Laminin, the perpetual virginity of Mary, and whether other religious writings can be from God, the book contains enough new material to commend its purchase to those who already own several of Ham's previous Creation Science books.

    In the chapter on "How Did We Get the Bible in English," chapter author Herb Samworth accepts a number of the principles and assumptions of modern textual criticism; however, his treatment is more balanced than many, as he acknowledges an ongoing controversy over the critical text's reliability.

    How Do We Know the Bible is True? Volume 1 is a fascinating read, and highly recommended.
  5. Cincinnati, OH
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Decent Addition to Apologetic Literature
    February 16, 2012
    Emusic82
    Cincinnati, OH
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 3
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    Ken Ham and Bodie Hodge's new book How Do We Know The Bible Is True? is an interesting addition to apologetics references. The book is designed as a series of questions and answers from several experts in various fields, from biblical scholars and archeologists to philosophy professors. While I disagreed with several points in the introduction to the book, some of the articles proved very useful.

    Ken Ham in his introduction argues that the creation story in Genesis "is the foundational history for all Christian doctrine, including the Gospel." Not only does this statement make a very broad assumption, but it gives no theological evidence for it's claim. In my estimation and according to other well known authors I have read, the only fundamental portion of the creation narrative that has any bearing on the gospel is the creation of Adam and Eve, and their fall to sin. Ham's blind assertion also gives him the passion to defend his Answers in Genesis ministry to the point of ostricizing scientists and believers alike that might find a more liberal interpretation of the Gospel but experience God's grace.

    There are also some segments of the book that dip into theological debate using literary or philosophical techniques. On the surface, these would seem to argue their point quite accurately. But as is the case with so many other areas of church history, this dismisses a rich body of commentary, church fathers and traditions that have viewed these theological topics for centuries. One such theological question is perpetual virginity of Mary. This is one of the many Marian doctrines of the Catholic church, and while it is easy for protestants to wave these off as "extrabiblical," church fathers dating back to the third century defended those views. This was also around the time that the church decided to establish the cannon of scripture. I think the topic deserves more than an 8 page chapter towards the end of the book.

    There are many segments, however that are helpful, such as the reliability of the Old and New Testaments. Debating biblical issues with those in the academic community can be effectively won with archeological, literary and historical evidence.

    Overall, I think this book provides a good basis for people wanting to understand a basic level of apologetics. Unfortunately, most subjects are treated through surface level responses. Anyone interested in going deeper, or having more arrows in their quiver will need to go elsewhere.

    I was provided a free copy of this book through New Leaf Publishing's book review program.
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