Intermediate Greek Grammar: Syntax for Students of the New Testament  -     By: David L. Mathewson, Elodie Ballantine Emig
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Intermediate Greek Grammar: Syntax for Students of the New Testament

Baker Academic / 2016 / Hardcover

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Product Description

Comprehensive enough to provide substantial help yet concise enough for frequent use, Intermediate Greek Grammar: Syntax for Students of the New Testament is ideal for intermediate Greek and Greek exegesis classes, as well as pastors and scholars. Incorporating advances of recent linguistic research in an accessible way and drawing on years of teaching experience, David L. Mathewson and Elodie Ballantine Emig make extensive use of New Testament texts to illustrate each grammatical category, helping students extend their grasp of Greek for biblical reading and interpretation.

Product Information

Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 304
Vendor: Baker Academic
Publication Date: 2016
Dimensions: 9.00 X 6.00 (inches)
ISBN: 0801030722
ISBN-13: 9780801030727

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Author Bio

David L. Mathewson (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is associate professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary in Littleton, Colorado, and the author of several books.

Elodie Ballantine Emig (MA, Denver Seminary) is instructor of New Testament Greek at Denver Seminary. She has been helping seminary students learn Greek well for three decades.

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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    The first intermediate grammar I'd read, but not the last
    September 8, 2016
    CSW
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This is the first book I would recommend students read for an intermediate Greek grammar.

    After this book, I would point students to Idioms of the Greek New Testament by Porter and Going Deeper with New Testament Greek by Kostenberger/Merkle/Plummer.

    Here is why I recommend Mathewson/Emig. The book endorses grammatical minimalism. This means the authors don't look for the most meaning possible in grammatical constructions and word studies. By doing this, they have put into words intuitive concerns I've had about grammatical maximalism for years, namely, that it treats Greek in a way that I've never seen anyone treat the English language or any other language. They have taken a subject filled with numerous labels and radically simplified it by separating genuine grammatical expectations from contextual clues for exegetical interpretation. The result is an amazingly accessible, concise, and memorable grammar.

    The book has a beautiful design, similar to other recent Greek resources published by Baker (Decker and Whitacre). It takes advantage of a black and gold color scheme. And the font is very readable. The margins weren't quite as spacious here as they were for Decker and Whitacre, but the weight is considerably lighter than Decker, which makes this a wonderful grammar to keep next to your GNT.

    The book could have had better exercises. And when it comes to the verbs, I would still have appreciated more information regarding verbal aspect. They convinced me that the kind of action and the time of the action is indicated only by the context, but I was still left wondering how the author's perspective on the action relates to time and kind of action. And I was left wondering in light of this what is the interpretive value of verbal aspect outside of matters relating to discourse grammar.

    I received a review copy from Baker, for which I would like to extend my thanksgiving here. Their generosity did not influence my thoughts toward the book.
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