1. Why Men Hate Going to Church, Revised and Updated
    Why Men Hate Going to Church, Revised and Updated
    David Murrow
    Thomas Nelson / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $9.29 Retail: $15.99 Save 42% ($6.70)
    4 Stars Out Of 5 34 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    Stock No: WW232155
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  1. New Zealand
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Must Read for Church Leaders
    March 2, 2012
    Logan
    New Zealand
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The premise of the book is pretty simple: why men hate going to church and some stuff that churches could do to become man-friendly. It all sounds rather un-PC really. But he has a point. You just have to look around almost any church and you'll know he has a point. Christianity has become feminised, it appeals to women far more than it does to men. Yet it shouldn't be that way. Murrow makes a point that truly healthy churches have manly men.

    So sure, you probably can't read this book without coming across something you don't really like, but don't let that put you off. This book is a must-read for anybody concerned with church leadership. It's not a call to radically change anything, just a call to be more man friendly.
  2. Berea, Ky
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    February 26, 2012
    Josh Phelps
    Berea, Ky
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 2
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 1
    Recently I have been thinking about Men and the Church. What does it mean to be manly and be a Christian? So when Why Men Hate Going to Church by David Murrow, came up for review I took a shot at it. I was excited to read this and I looked forward to seeing what this book could teach me. However I was not as excited as I finished the book which took me a long time as I really had to force myself to finish reading.

    Mr. Murrow states that manly men who see God as the Lion of Judah will find church unappealing because the Lamb of God is the dominant image. He also talks about how many things in the church are feminized and that Men don't want the image of "Jesus is my boyfriend." While I agree most men don't want the Jesus is my boyfriend image I also believe that everyone, men and women, need both the Lion of Judah and the Lamb of God. In large part we need them both because they are a part of God.

    The main problem I have with this book is that it is not calling men to the church, but instead calling the church to men. The fact that he uses the terms manly man as the one who are out of the church is not only insinuating that the men in church are not manly but also prescribes to the worldly definition of what makes a man a man.

    Overall, it was extremely hard to read through this book and took a lot longer than I would have liked it to take. I can't recommend this book to the normal person, but there might be a few nuggets that a Pastor could pull out.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com http://BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  3. Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Why Men Hate Going to Church
    February 11, 2012
    mellie
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    When I opened David Murrow's book, Why Men Hate Going to Church, I had anticipated reading something that would broaden the discussion about gender roles in the church, present some nuance that would soften me to the plight of my male brothers, and illustrate that men, are, in fact, marginalized in significant ways within the Christian context. I've had a bit of an obsession of late with reading books, watching documentaries, and talking to people about the perspective of men about their jobs, parenting, and the ways that the healthcare system, and social systems in general, sometimes do not invite men in because of a particular sort of blindness to what engages men. I guess that I was also hoping for an analysis that would help me to better understand the men in my life who may not feel as at home on the pew, and as an extension of that, I was also looking for new ideas from the author around how sensitivity to the needs of men in a congregation could make churches more inviting.

    Some of these areas were covered in great detail, and the self-reflection of the author regarding his own church experiences was telling. His analysis will compel you to think more deeply about the absence of men in churches, and what he perceives is attractive to men in other parts of the world who attach themselves to religious communities. I've learned that he thinks that men's greatest fear is powerlessness and that women's is loneliness. I've learned that he has some issues with women in ministry. I've learned that he thinks that the church has gone soft on Jesus' real message in favor of a more feminized version of it. I've learned that, from his perspective, men want to be heroes and that women want to be rescued. And I've learned that he sees this hero paradigm as being very aligned with the Gospel message.

    I will freely admit; however, that a number of things about this book make me very uncomfortable. This discomfort comes, in large part, from the nagging sense that I had while reading this that Murrow is using a lot of anecdotal information; personal bias; references to extreme polarities in the discussion of gender and how it ought to look in the Christian context. Additionally, I had this nagging sense throughout the reading of this that his ideas have developed from an overly simplistic approach to the discussion of gender in the church and the world at large, and that looking broadly within Christianity at the historical reasons for how and why we are where we are might be more important.

    He suggests that manly men, as he sees them, will be unlikely to find church appealing because their idea of God as the Lion of Judah can't be realized in a context where the Lamb of God is the dominant image. He also takes issue with the recent "romancing of Jesus" as well and suggests that we now have a situation where language is taken over by an erotic paradigm with Jesus as a lover and where worship is very focused on filling up the void in people related to the absence of good relationships in their lives. I agree with some of what he says, but I think that his ideas would be more fruitful in a dialogue where the topic of gender could be enlarged a bit more and where men and women could engage around what is happening as this book might come across to some as a typical patriarchal approach to the discourse.

    Perhaps if I read his next book, I'll feel a bit less discomfort. I hope so. I would encourage readers of this book to see it as one sort of analysis that can inform how some men may feel about church, but not to see it as a gold standard or handbook for how to redesign church as I think that it does not broadly address the range of ways that men may define their realities and faith experiences. I would also recommend that the following books be read in conjunction with this, particularly if the readers are Evangelicals, as this book might otherwise create even more of an instantiation of very limited ways of seeing gender and thoughtful dialogue about this and other issues within the church: "Half the Church" by Carolyn Curtis James; "The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind" by Mark Knoll or "Letters to a Young Evangelical" by Tony Campolo. I think that there are many other great books that could be read in conjunction with this that might lead to a much more fruitful and productive discussion, but I definitely liked that this author made an attempt to do an analysis, and I respect his wading into a very sensitive area in an attempt to encourage greater awareness and discussion of a very current issue in many churches today.

    BookSneeze

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  4. Age: Under 18
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Why Men Hate Going to Church
    January 7, 2012
    hyunhee17
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Why Men Hate Going to Church by David Murrow.. Every time I go to church I am curious, the priest is curious why is it there are fewer men compare to women. Are they too busy that they don't have time going to church? Do they still have work during Sunday? But after reading Why Men Hate Going to Church, everything is answered.. try reading it!

    I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  5. Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    A great word on men's issues today!
    December 26, 2011
    RobbyM
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Why Men Hate Going To Church by David Murrow

    In this book, an updated and edited version of David Murrow's 2005 original, the author addresses the issue of why men are missing in our churches, especially the Evangelical church. He contrasts the "tone" of churches and how they take on more feminine traits than male traits. While men use terms like "boring", and "irrelevant" when describing their distaste for church, Murrow offers more detailed examples of how churches, and even Christ Himself, are depicted with mostly feminine traits, and that this leads men to find other outlets for their more natural tendencies toward competition, strength, and even conflict.

    I find Murrow's views very enlightening. Moreover, they align with much of my personal discoveries about men (including me!) that indicate men are in pursuit of many "masculine" things because of their fear of being labeled as too effeminate, or not "manly" enough. In fact, Murrow's views are another example of how the "absence" of men from many of our most important institutions (church, school, and the home, for instance) is actually promoting an increase in the "feminizing" of our culture.

    I also found the book an easy read overall. For those who like proof, Murrow provides significant data to back up his assertions concerning men and the church. For those who are concerned with adequate Biblical grounding, Murrow cites the Bible multiple times as he describes the conflict we've created in the church between Jesus the "Lamb" and Jesus the "Lion".

    I recommend this book to anyone researching the issue of men and the church, or who are pursuing further understanding of how to reach more men in this generation for the Kingdom.

    Disclosure Note: I obtained "Why Men Hate Going To Church" from Thomas Nelson publishing via their "Booksneeze" program which offers bloggers and other reviewers books for free in exchange for a published review. I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for the book, and the views expressed in this review are my own.
Displaying items 11-15 of 34
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