God & Time: Four Views
Stock No: WW15513
God & Time: Four Views   -     Edited By: Gregory E. Ganssle
    By: Paul Helm, Alan G. Padgett, William Lane Craig, Nicholas Wolterstorff

God & Time: Four Views

InterVarsity Press / 2001 / Paperback

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Product Description

How should we best understand God's relationship with our time-bound universe? In this book, four notable philosophers skill fully take on this difficult topic, all from within a Christian framework yet contending for difficult views. Paul Helm presents the divine timeless eternity as relative timelessness. William Lane Craig offers the timeleness and omnitemporality view while Nicholas Wolterstorff argues for God of time position.

Product Information

Title: God & Time: Four Views
By: Paul Helm, Alan G. Padgett, William Lane Craig, Nicholas Wolterstorff
Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 252
Vendor: InterVarsity Press
Publication Date: 2001
Dimensions: 9 X 6 X 5/8 (inches)
Weight: 12 ounces
ISBN: 0830815511
ISBN-13: 9780830815517
Stock No: WW15513

Publisher's Description

The eternal God has created the universe. And that universe is time-bound. How can we best understand God's relationship with our time-bound universe? For example, does God experience each moment of time in succession or are all times present to God?

How we think of God and time has implications for our understanding of the nature of time, the creation of the universe, God's knowledge of the future, God's interaction with his creation and the fullness of God's life.

In this Spectrum Multiview volume, four notable philosophers skillfully take on this difficult topic--all writing from within a Christian framework yet contending for different views. Paul Helm argues that divine eternity should be construed as a state of absolute timelessness. Alan G. Padgett maintains that God's eternity is more plausibly to be understood as relative timelessness. William Lane Craig presents a hybrid view that combines timelessness with omnitemporality. And Nicholas Wolterstorff advocates a doctrine of unqualified divine temporality.

Each essay is followed by responses from the other three contributors and a final counter-response from the original essayist, making for a lively exchange of ideas. Editor Gregory E. Ganssle provides a helpful introduction to the debate and its significance. Together these five scholars conduct readers on a stimulating and mind-stretching journey into one of the most controversial and challenging areas of theology today.

Spectrum Multiview Books offer a range of viewpoints on contested topics within Christianity, giving contributors the opportunity to present their position and also respond to others in this dynamic publishing format.

Author Bio

Greg Ganssle (PhD, Syracuse) is professor of philosophy at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University. He is the author of several books, including A Reasonable God: Engaging the New Face of Atheism and Thinking About God, and he is the editor of God and Time.


Paul Helm is a teaching fellow in theology and philosophy at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. From 1993 to 2000 he taught as professor of the history and philosophy of religion at King's College, University of London. He has published numerous books and articles, including Eternal God: A Study of God Without Time (Oxford University Press, 1988), Belief Politics (Cambridge University Press, 1994) and Faith and Understanding (Eerdmans, 1997).


Alan G. Padgett (DPhil, Oxford University) is professor of systematic theology at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he serves as the chair of the history and theology division. His books include Christianity and Western Thought (volumes 2 and 3), Faith and Reason: Three Views and But Is It All True? The Bible and the Question of Truth. Previously, he was professor of theology and the philosophy of science at Azusa Pacific University, and he is an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church.


William Lane Craig (PhD, University of Birmingham, England; DTheol, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany) is professor of philosophy at Talbot School of Theology and at Houston Baptist University. In 2016 he was named by The Best Schools as one of the 50 most influential living philosophers. Craig has authored or edited over forty books, including The Kalam Cosmological Argument; Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom; God, Time, and Eternity; and God and Abstract Objects, as well as over 150 articles in professional publications of philosophy and theology, including The Journal of Philosophy, New Testament Studies, Journal for the Study of the New Testament, American Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy, and British Journal for Philosophy of Science.


Wolterstorff is Noah Porter Professor of Philosophy at the Yale Divinity School. He has published many books and articles, including When Justice and Peace Embrace (Eerdmans, 1983), Divine Discourse: Philosophical Reflections on the Claim That God Speaks (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and Locke and the Ethics of Belief (Cambridge University Press, 1996) as well as the seminal paper "God Everlasting" (first published in 1975). Wolterstorff's latest book is Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

Publisher's Weekly

In a related issue, four theologians address the degree to which God is bound by finite time in God & Time: Four Views, from InterVarsity Press, edited by Gregory E. Ganssle, which has been putting out some highly provocative books on perplexing theological questions. While the essays by Paul Helm, Alan G. Padgett, William Lane Craig and Nicholas Wolterstoff deliberate the question on a plane too high for total newcomers (who may need clarifications of terms such as "omnitemporality"), theology students will not want to miss this. Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Author Bio

Ganssle serves with the Rivendell Institute for Christian Thought and Learning, a special project of the Campus Crusade for Christ student ministry at Yale University. He has taught philosophy at Syracuse University and has worked as a teaching fellow and part-time lecturer in the philosophy department at Yale University. He has published academic papers on God's relation to time, free will, and St. Augustine. He has also coedited an anthology of philosophical essays for Oxford University Press called God and Time: Essays on the Divine Nature.

Publisher Description

The eternal God has created the universe. And that universe is time-bound. How can we best understand God's relationship with our time-bound universe? For example, does God experience each moment of time in succession or are all times present to God?

How we think of God and time has implications for our understanding of the nature of time, the creation of the universe, God's knowledge of the future, God's interaction with his creation and the fullness of God's life.

In this book, four notable philosophers skillfully take on this difficult topic--all writing from within a Christian framework yet contending for different views. Paul Helm argues that divine eternity should be construed as a state of absolute timelessness. Alan G. Padgett maintains that God's eternity is more plausibly to be understood as relative timelessness. William Lane Craig presents a hybrid view that combines timelessness with omnitemporality. And Nicholas Wolterstorff advocates a doctrine of unqualified divine temporality.

Each essay is followed by responses from the other three contributors and a final counter-response from the original essayist, making for a lively exchange of ideas. Editor Gregory E. Ganssle provides a helpful introduction to the debate and its significance. Together these five scholars conduct readers on a stimulating and mind-stretching journey into one of the most controversial and challenging areas of theology today.

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