4.8 Stars Out Of 5
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  1. Christy Lockstein
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Intellectual discussion of justice thru the church
    December 1, 2010
    Christy Lockstein
    Generous Justice by Timothy Keller is an intelligent and reasoned discussion on how Christians should be serving within the world today. Keller, who is a pastor of a large church in New York City, throws aside the differences between fundamentalists, who focus on teaching about God, and the progressive church, which is focused on social justice. Keller says they both have it wrong by focusing on one side and ignoring the other. By using several biblical examples, as well as contemporary anecdotes, he explains how the church is called care for the poor in radical and unexpected ways. The first century church pooled their resources and had no poor among them, Keller recognizes that today's church isn't so simple, but that doesn't allow the church to simply ignore the problems in their communities. He encourages churches to move into communities in need of help and then recruit leaders from the neighborhood to make them a part of permanent change. There are other books on this subject out there, but Keller's is the first I've read that gives real suggestions that any reader can follow. Chapter seven is a fascinating discussion on just what the word "justice" means, with three philosophical definitions and how all of them miss the mark as well. Keller's focus is that true justice for everyone can only be found in the Bible and by studying the Word of God. His writing is very cerebral and inspiring.
  2. Tyler
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    March 20, 2011
    Tyler
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Timothy Keller has done it again! An excellent work that re-aligns one's sense of justice from a worldly political perspective to that centered on Christ.
  3. iamfree
    Windsor, ON
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Confronting the Polarization of The Church
    February 27, 2011
    iamfree
    Windsor, ON
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Great Book!!!! It gives both the liberal and conservative churches something to truly ponder. In North America the Christian Church has divided itself by the world's political views and allied itself, wholeheartedly, to their belief system. Timothy Keller, once again, demonstrates that to be a Christian is beyond political ideology, but an ongoing transformation into the likeness of our Saviour. This can only happen as we live practicing the same justice that He has taught us in scripture.
  4. Jenna P
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great Book
    June 9, 2024
    Jenna P
    I read "Generous Justice" by Timothy Keller for this book review. This book talks about justice in the Bible and deconstructs people's false perceptions of the Bible's justice. It also brings up different stories/events in the Bible that are examples of God being a just God. God loves justice. In the Bible, we have read many stories of where God/Jesus has shown justice either in a public way or a private way (I will be writing about a few that the book has covered. It also mentions inferiority and how we need to see people as worthy and valued because that is how God sees them. The book also mentions people's arguments with moral standards and many other things. The book brings up Christian ethics and morality as well. It is also great to see different perspectives when reading this book. I will write about many areas of the book that caught my eye and the knowledge I gained. I will also write about the different perceptions of the Bible from people who took it out of context, as mentioned in this book. Also, I will say many things in the Bible that the book mentions that I never realized before. Based on what I have read, I will give my opinion of why the author wrote this book. I will also talk about the pros and cons of this book and if I would recommend this book to others. One of the reasons why Keller created this book was for readers to be aware of injustices and to ensure that we do justice, even if it is a little act of kindness. Keller also brings a lot of Biblical evidence to this. He brings up the story of the Samaritan woman and how there was an injustice that happened to the Samaritans because they were not Jews. Also, the Jews had the issue of the Samaritans worshiping on a mountain and not in a temple, but what were they supposed to do if they were not allowed in the Jerusalem temple because they were Gentiles? Jesus bridged the gap between the Jews and the Samaritans. When Jesus even talked to the Samaritan woman, He brought justice. Also, the fact that God wanted to bridge the gap between Jews and Gentiles tells me that God is a God of justice. Keller mentions why we need to do justice. Chapter 5 states, "Human beings are not accidents, but creations. Without a belief in creation, we are forced to face the implication that ultimately there is no good reason to treat human beings as having dignity" (pg. 82). This was one of the quotes that I loved. Keller has other reasons, but this is just one of them that I want to put into this review. God has created us, and we are all equal. We have just as much worth/value as any other person. If we look at people as what God sees them, then if there are injustices, we need to help stand up for them. Justice could be helping people who have experienced injustice; it can be simple acts of kindness. For example, Keller reminds us that we must give grace to others as God gives us grace. Keller also explains that God's grace makes us just and compassionate to others. Keller also mentions society's perceptions of the Bible and some of its history. There have been people who used the Bible to try to support their beliefs that are not biblical, or the context of the scriptures has been twisted. Keller mentions that some people have tried to twist some verses in a way that supports their opinions. Some people have tried to use the Bible in a way to make the Bible sound like it supports slavery or other injustices. They have been attempting to use the Curse of Cain and Abel and the mark by trying to relate it to skin color and slavery when it was a whole other context and had nothing to do with skin color or slavery at all. Keller makes many points in the book. I can't cover everything, but I agree with his writing. There is so much, but you must read the book to understand and get the whole story. We must be peaceful people who stand for justice, especially when happenings are against the Bible; we must still show compassion. If I rate this book, I would give it a 10 out of 10. I recommend this book to everyone or anyone. I have learned a lot and changed a few of my perspectives and thinking. It is a great read. Also, it has eight chapters, totaling 189 pages, for people who struggle with reading. It is an easy read, but it simultaneously has a lot of depth. To the author, thank you for this beautiful book. You gave so many perspectives and have helped me understand some concepts even more. I appreciate you! This is one of the best books I have read. I know there is so much stuff that I could say about this book, but these are the things that I liked in the book. All of it is good. My review is not the best, but I recommend this book.
  5. Robert
    Texas
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent, thoughtful material about compassion
    January 26, 2013
    Robert
    Texas
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Tim Keller offers an excellent examination regarding what Scripture teaches about the obligations of Scripture on believers to care for and seek out justice for the poor, needy and disenfranchised. In a way there was a "Radical" flavor to this, Keller style, but the message of this book was clear and well-defended. Keller can get a little heady with his philosophical arguments and the numerous authors he cites, almost to the extent that this title could use a couple reads (which wouldn't be a bad thing.)
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