1. Five Views on Apologetics
    Steven B. Cowan, ed.
    Zondervan / 2000 / Trade Paperback
    Our Price$17.99 Retail Price$24.99 Save 28% ($7.00)
    5.0 out of 5 stars for Five Views on Apologetics. View reviews of this product. 2 Reviews
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    Stock No: WW24764
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  1. achildofgod2008
    Sweetwater, TN
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    March 14, 2010
    achildofgod2008
    Sweetwater, TN
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    When I purchased this book I was anticipating to learn about how to do apologetics five different ways, but thats not really the focus of this work. This book examines the methodology of the five prominent methods of apologetics.I did find "Five Views on Apologetics" helpful and enlightening in many ways. The book was a little difficult to follow at some points and the authors do use some difficult terms that anyone who hasn't done much philosophy or apologetic study before may not know or understand without some other studying.But overall I have learned much, and this book has enticed my desirer to study more on the topic of apologetics.
  2. Teutonic Warrior
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent Overview of Apologetic Methodologies
    January 5, 2019
    Teutonic Warrior
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    5 Views on Apologetics is an excellent resource for anyone seeking to familiarize themself with the various ways to defend the Christian faith. I enjoyed the first two essays the most (the Classical Method by William Lane Craig and the Evidential Method by Gary Habermas). My only complaint here was that I am not completely sure I see any appreciable difference between these views. I'm not sure the authors are completely sure of their differences either, for they are virtually identical.

    The Cumulative Method (by Paul Feinberg) seems to be confusing. This chapter seems unclear about what exactly Feinberg is trying to defend. His method is clearly different from the others, but he doesn't articulate well why it is.

    The fourth essay was my least favorite. The Presuppositional Method, defended by John M. Frame. I did enjoy seeing the responses to his essay though. Unfortunately there is not much literature exposing the fallacies and dangers of Presuppositional apologetics. Here, the reader has 4 good critiques of this view. Habermas' response is by far the most comprehensive and scathing of them all. He really takes Frame to town over his circular reasoning and inconsistency. Habermas' response alone is worth the price of the book!

    Finally, Kelly James Clark defends the Reformed Epistemological Method. This view was new to me, and I found it somewhat compelling. However, all in all, I feel the Classical Method is correct (although in this book I feel that the Evidential Method was defended the best). I recommend this book to everyone interested in apologetics in general and apologetic method in particular.
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