1. Fairness Is Overrated: And 51 Other Leadership Principles to Revolutionize Your Workplace
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    Fairness Is Overrated: And 51 Other Leadership Principles to Revolutionize Your Workplace
    Tim Stevens
    Thomas Nelson / 2014 / Hardcover
    $2.49 Retail: $22.99 Save 89% ($20.50)
    4 Stars Out Of 5 1 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    Stock No: WW206544
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  1. Chicopee, MA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    How to be a more effective leader
    January 2, 2015
    wheelsms
    Chicopee, MA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    By his own admission, Tim Stevens is not your typical leader. After high school, he joined a non-profit organization and rose through the ranks. He left it behind to join the staff of a church plant. He eventually served as executive pastor at Granger Community Church in Indiana. Stevens background led him to the conclusion that leaders learn by leading.

    While not necessarily anti-education, Stevens believes that there are times to throw out the instruction manual and write a new one that blends biblical truth, practical lessons, and daily realities. That is what he tries to do in this his latest book, Fairness is Overrated: And 51 other leadership principles to revolutionize your workplace.

    The book is divided into four parts and reflects the four pillars that Stevens believes effective leadership is built on.

    Part one focuses on becoming a leader worth following. The lessons deal with the topics of integrity, family, being fully present, and margin.

    Part two gives instructions on finding the right people. It addresses issues such as when to ignore resumes and when to pay attention to them, using social media in checking a persons background and character, how to ask questions in interviews, and much more.

    Part three addresses the topic of building a healthy culture within your organization. It talks about agendas, building teams, having fun together, and dealing with silos.

    Part four touches on the topic of leading confidently through a crisis. The chapters deal with resignations, layoffs, firings, conflict resolution, and the importance of communication throughout.

    Each of his chapters are relatively shortthree to four pages in length. They are short, pithy, and practical. A few of the chapters are specifically addressed to those leading churches, but the vast majority are applicable to churches and businesses alike. I found the book practical and encouraging. It was well worth reading and referring to again later.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com http://BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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