Philippians (Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament)    -     By: Joseph Hellerman
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Philippians (Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament)

B&H Academic / 2015 / Paperback

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Pastors and teachers---save research time without compromising on quality. Hellerman's guide features a brief introduction, basic outline, bibliography of recommended commentaries and specialist works, homiletical helps, suggestions for further study, and a paragraph-by-paragraph exegesis from the Greek text of Paul's letter to the church in Philippi. Includes scriptural and grammatical indexes. 366 pages, softcover from B&H.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 366
Vendor: B&H Academic
Publication Date: 2015
Dimensions: 9 X 6 X .67 (inches)
ISBN: 1433676869
ISBN-13: 9781433676864
Series: Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament

Publisher's Description

The Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament (EGGNT) closes the gap between the Greek text and the available lexical and grammatical tools, providing all the necessary information for greater understanding of the text. The series makes interpreting any given New Testament book easier, especially for those who are hard pressed for time but want to preach or teach with accuracy and authority.

Each volume begins with a brief introduction to the particular New Testament book, a basic outline, and a list of recommended commentaries. The body is devoted to paragraph-by-paragraph exegesis of the Greek text and includes homiletical helps and suggestions for further study. A comprehensive exegetical outline of the New Testament book completes each EGGNT volume.

Author Bio

Joseph H. Hellerman (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, La Mirada, California.

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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Greek insights that are worth the price.
    November 30, 2016
    Angelo
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    One challenge in a bulky commentary even though based on the Greek text, is that you have to read (or look at) paragraphs or pages to find lexical, textual and grammatical insights. Here, as you read through paragraphs and pages, there are a lot of Greek language insights. It is a little heavy reading though, in a sense that there are times too much info (including references cited) in a short amount of space. Though, the numerous Greek insights are worth it. But (just like previous guides) you must know intermediate Greek (even if not an expert) to benefit from this guide

    Just like the rest of the books in the series, the format (as stated in the general introduction) here is: a brief introduction (authorship, date, etc. . .); a basic outline; list of recommended commentaries; abbreviations; then at the end of the book, a comprehensive exegetical outline; grammar and subject indexes. But the bulk is the paragraph by paragraph exegesis that includes the following: 1) the Greek text phrase by phrase diagram (sentence diagram makes more sense to me but this block diagram keeps the word order and also shows the relationships of the sentences/phrases); 2) a structural analysis of the passage or the paragraph; 3) a discussion of the passage, vocabulary, textual variants and grammatical analysis; 4) various translations of significant words or phrases (using EVV or dictionaries or his own); 5) list of bibliography for each suggested topic related to the passage[great for further study like 2:5-11 resources cited; 6) homiletical suggestions (they are good, very exegetical, that can be used as is or sharpened homiletically ).

    Dr. Hellerman takes that Paul wrote Philippians while imprisoned in Rome around AD 60 to 62 to express gratitude, challenge the Philippians and address issues of disunity and false teachers. Dr. Hellerman takes the view that present tense signifies ongoing and continual action when lexical, grammatical and contextual factors support such a notion. He rejected the use of oral rhetorical categories in analyzing Philippians.

    He listed 6 main commentaries he used (Fee, Hansen, Martin, OBrien and Reumann & Silva. He provided brief comments about these commentaries with OBrien as being the most thorough and Reumann as for scholars than pastors. He also used other commentaries and other works.

    The phrase by phrase discussion is what I think the most helpful section particularly in grammar. It discusses grammatical analysis like in 1:9, en in en epignosei marks sphere (31). It also provides grammatical options like in 1:14, tois desmois can either be instrumental dative or dative of cause (45). The grammar can lead to different interpretative choices like in 2:6, en Xristou Iesou can mean Christs mindset or the believers union with Christ (108). It also touched on the grammatical issue of subjective genitive or objective genitive in3:9, dia pisteos, Xristou. It has about 1 of discussion showing support for either interpretation and recognizing that it is a difficult interpretative decision but provisionally decided on the objective genitive interpretation.

    A few more examples of Greek grammar:

    1. 2:1 ei is a first class condition that assumes reality and therefore may be translated as since. This is indeed a possibility.

    2. 3:21 politeuma en ouranois huparchei was interpreted as functioning as citizens of heavenly commonwealth in that outpost and not as a colony of heaven established on earth because of the use of en and not eis.

    3. 4:6 meden merimnate is an example of prohibition to stop, with stop worrying as a reasonable translation. I have understood this to mean as a general principle, but something to consider.

    4. 4:13 en in en tw endunamount is marker of agency but better take it as incorporative sense, that is in vital union I received this guide from B & H to provide an honest review.with Christ who strengthens me.

    I received this guide from B & H to provide an honest review.
  2. Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Highly Recommended!!
    August 6, 2015
    John M Kight
    Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Few contemporary scholars today are more qualified and equipped for the exegetical task of leading students through Pauls letter to the Philippians than Joseph H. Hellerman. Hellerman is Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Talbot School of Theology. He received a Th.M. from Talbot School of Theology and a Ph.D. from University of California Los Angeles. He has published a number of academic monographs dealing with the social history of early Christianity, including Reconstructing Honor in Roman Philippi (Cambridge University Press, 2005). He has also published several journal articles dealing with various socio-historical and interpretive issues related to Philippians. So, in many ways, the outpouring of the present commentary is a culmination of years of exegetical consideration and study by an expert in the Roman culture of the first century, and the letter of Philippians as a whole.

    Following in the footsteps of the previous volumes, Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament: Philippians, looks to eliminate the gap between the Greek text and the available lexical and grammatical tools, synthesizing all the necessary exegetical information into one convenient place. Essentially, aside from bringing his own expertise to the conversation, Hellerman has combed through all the necessary works published in the last few decadeslexical, grammatical, exegetical, etc.collected the similarities and differences, and brought to the table everything the student would need to make an informed exegetical decision. As a personal exercise I translated the text as I read through the commentary, and there were several times that it felt as if Hellerman was personally walking me through the text providing the various interpretive options and exegetical insights needed to make a well informed decision on the text. This was the first time that I sought to translate and entire book while reading a commentary that dealt with textual and exegetical issues. It was a great exercise and ultimately a testimony to the helpfulness of the present volume for the student, pastor, or teacher.

    The commentary begins with a brief introduction to Philippians which includes a concise conversation around typical introductory matters (authorship, date and provenance, occasion, etc.), as well as a Recommended Commentaries section that highlights the primary works cited throughout the book. Each section of the commentary deals with a paragraph of text, and begins with a prepositional outline of the Greek text (UBS5). Followed by the prepositional outline, Hellerman guides the reader exegetically through each preposition, commenting on various lexical, grammatical, textual, and socio-historical issues. Ultimately, while discussing the conclusions of various commentators and other popular translations, Hellerman is effectively exhibiting the exegetical landscape of the letter to the student and directing attention where the need arises. I found this to be particularly helpful in the discussion surrounding Philippians 2:5-11. Each section of the book concludes with a For Further Study section that has a number of recommended journal articles and monographs on various topics related to the section being discussed. Additionally, each section includes Homiletical Suggestions section in which Hellerman has provided the reader with some suggested preaching divisions. Lastly, the back of the commentary includes both a grammar and scripture index, both of which will prove helpful for future reference.

    In conclusion, if you are looking to preach or teach through Philippians in the near future, or simply want to obtain a better understanding of the letter in general, I would highly recommend Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament: Philippians. I could not think of a better starting place for the student, pastor, or teacher. The bar for the EGGNT series has just been raised!
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