John (Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament)    -     By: Murray J. Harris
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John (Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament)

B&H Academic / 2015 / Paperback

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This volume is a groundbreaking resource that closes the gap between grammatical analysis, exegesis, and sermon preparation. Providing students, teachers, and pastors with the background for understanding the Greek text of John's Gospel, Murray Harris begins his technical commentary with a brief introduction on authorship, date, occasion, and purpose. Also included are a list of recommended commentaries, extensive exegetical notes, and more.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 516
Vendor: B&H Academic
Publication Date: 2015
Dimensions: 9 X 6 X 1 (inches)
ISBN: 1433676877
ISBN-13: 9781433676871
Series: Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament

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Publisher's Description

The Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament (EGGNT) closes the gap between the Greek text and the available lexical and grammatical tools, providing all the necessary information for greater understanding of the text. The series makes interpreting any given New Testament book easier, especially for those who are hard pressed for time but want to preach or teach with accuracy and authority.

Each volume begins with a brief introduction to the particular New Testament book, a basic outline, and a list of recommended commentaries. The body is devoted to paragraph-by-paragraph exegesis of the Greek text and includes homiletical helps and suggestions for further study. A comprehensive exegetical outline of the New Testament book completes each EGGNT volume.

Author Bio

Murray J. Harris is professor emeritus of New Testament Exegesis and Theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois, and former warden of Tyndale House in Cambridge, England. He presently resides in New Zealand.

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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Not a verse by verse analysis of the Greek but still superb in Greek in covers
    November 28, 2016
    Angelo
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I am a fan of EGGNT that started when Dr. Harris first edition of Colossians was first published in the 1990s (though I think I got my copy in 2001 or 2002 of the first edition). I really like the extensive notes in Greek in concise form yet deep with details in a user friendly format.

    Now the gospel of John in Greek is about 6x as long as Ephesians (my approximation). The EGGNT John has 366 pages and the Ephesians EGGNT has 246 pages. So I did not expect this volume to be as exhaustive (covering every phrase) as in Ephesians (which covered every phrase in Greek of the book).

    The proposed outline has 5 main points (in Roman numerals) with sub points (in capital letters), then with Arabic numbers at points under sub points and then small letters under the Arabic numbers. An example of which is:

    II The Public Ministry of Jesus (1:19-12:50)

    A. Prelude to Jesus Public Ministry (1:19-51)

    1. The Testimony of John the Baptist (1:19-34)

    a) Johns Relation to Jesus the Messiah (1:19-28)

    Many discussions occur on the Arabic number level with some on the capital letters level and also some on the small letters level.

    The notes on passages are different than previous editions. The format is, the bold verse reference, then the notes and explanation, usually, the Greek word first. An example is: 1:18 Oudeij nom. sg. masc, of the subst. (and adj.) . . It is not also as detailed as Ephesians or James wherein every phrase was discussed and dealt with. Here in John, the treatment of words and phrases are limited and selective.

    Even with this format and limitations, this guide is still rich with Greek language insights. Some examples are:

    1. Textual variants in 1:18 were discussed concise yet sufficiently.

    2. The I am statements were covered sufficiently in the introduction and the text itself.

    3. Jn.3:16 outws means to such extent or so dearly, (not manner or this way)

    4. 14:1 believe verbs are imperative though the first one can be indicative and the second, imperative

    5. 14:6 the articles can be for abstract nouns used for concrete application or to emphasized the supreme instances, Jesus is the preeminent way, truth and life.

    Harris takes the position that John the apostles is the author with pastoral, evangelistic, apologetic and liturgical purposes. This is interesting for we usually think of a single purpose only. He wrote to both Christians and non-Christians in the 80s or 90s. His preferred reading of 20:31 for believe is aorist and not present subjunctive.

    There are select diagrams like in 3:1-15 (with missing verses/words) and 6:31-58 (with missing verses/words). As usual, the further study sections (total of 46 themes/topics, sometimes several in one discussion section) and the notes in the discussion are extensive for anyone who wants further study.

    The homiletical suggestions are not always the usual homiletical outline with parallelism etc. . They are similar with the exegetical outline at the back but with some differences. But both will be helpful in providing the flow of thought and overview of a passage in smaller chunks or bigger chunks.

    I wish the Greek discussion covered more than what was covered here but I understand the space limitations of publications. However, what was covered is great enough to help in the study of Johns Greek text. I think the price is worth it in paperback, the kindle price is a bit high for me.
  2. Kansas City MO
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Highly recommended for the student/preacher/teacher of John's Gospel!
    June 7, 2016
    PastorD
    Kansas City MO
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Murray Harris brings a vast knowledge of Johns use of the Greek language and is precise in his commentary on how John presents Jesus as God, as the Christ, and how eternal life is emphasized in this Gospel. The Table of Contents in and of itself is impressive, covering over twelve pages which should tell you that Harris work is outlined in a detailed and organized manner, without being muddied.

    For the preacher of Gods Word, Harris provides Homiletical Suggestions at the end of each section and an exegetical outline at the back of his exhaustive work. But reading this exegetical guide is not exhausting, for it is easy to locate chapter/verse based on the table of contents, and the Scripture Index is helpful, too.

    At first glance I was disappointed that there was not a Bibliography of works cited, but then I quickly noticed that he provides a list of commentary/works at the end of each section labeled For Further Study. I like that even better as the selections for further study are much more applicable to the immediate text at hand. In his introduction, Harris offers a list of five commentaries which he found most helpful in his work, and this is followed by a sort of annotated bibliography explaining why these five commentaries are good options and how they interact with each other (page 13). This is followed by references to other commentaries and a brief description of their value to his work.

    Interacting with the Greek language, Harris does not bog down the reader with a running interpretation/definition of every Greek word, but highlights the important nuances of the Greek language. Where he deems it necessary, Harris provides a structured outline of the Greek text (i.e. diagramming a sentence). For those who are in or have been in seminary, the second year Greek student would understand more than the first year student, but even with that being the case, any student of the Bible lay or pastor will benefit tremendously from this work. And I cannot emphasize the exegetical value enough.

    A quick example is taken from page 96 regarding Jesus encounter with the Samaritan woman (John 4). Harris offers the following: Several stages are discernible in the womans attitude toward Jesus a certain sauciness (v. 9), a tempered respect (v. 11), a gentle humoring (v. 15), a developing recognition (v. 19), and an embryonic belief (v. 29) (my abbreviations).

    The pages are crisp, the binding is secure, the book lays flat, highlighting does not bleed through to the next page, and the font size is easily readable.

    Disclosure: This book was provided to me free by B & H Academic for the purpose of reviewing, and my opinions are expressly my own and do not reflect the opinions of the publicist, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html.
  3. Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent Display of Thoughtful Exegesis
    October 15, 2015
    John M Kight
    Michigan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Murray J. Harris is professor emeritus of New Testament exegesis and theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and formerly served as warden of Tyndale House at Cambridge University in England. Harris has a Ph.D. from the University of Manchester, where he studied under F. F. Bruce, and is the author of numerous books, including, Jesus as God: The New Testament Use of Theos in Reference to Jesus, Slave of Christ: A New Testament Metaphor for Total Devotion to Christ, The Second Epistle to the Corinthians from the acclaimed New International Greek Testament Commentary series (NIGTC), Colossians and Philemon in the growing Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament series (EGGNT), and many more. Most recently, Harris has released his second contributing volume to the EGGNT series, a volume on the Fourth Gospel that certain to make its residence on the bookshelves of many.

    The Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament series was birthed out of a desire to function as a type of middle-ground resource that seeks to narrow the gap between the text of the Greek New Testament (UBS5) and the available lexical and grammatical tool being used by pastors and teachers today. In this present volume, Harris has delivered a goldmine of exegetical wisdom and theological insight into one of the most important New Testament books. The book begins with a very brief introduction focused on authorship, purpose, audience, setting, and date, as well as an extremely helpful and necessary section of Johns style of Greek and the overall structure of the book. The introduction concludes with a short discussion surrounding the pros and cons of five recommended commentaries and additional resources. This section is useful for the detailed reader as these resources become imperative in further investigating the exegesis that follows. However, if you are looking for an up-to-date bibliography on the Fourth Gospel this is not going to be a helpful section. Still, the abbreviations section just prior to the introduction does provide a wealth of resources mentioned throughout the book that may be of use.

    As the reader enters into the commentary of the gospel, Harris has skillfully utilized a similar format and layout as the other volumes in the EGGNT series. Some accommodations have been made given the nature of the gospels themselves, as opposed to that of epistles. For example, the reader is not going to find as much sentence diagraming in this volume as the others, and the layout centers primarily around the verse level as opposed to the clause level in the other volumes. Personally, I found this to be somewhat of a disappointment because of the helpfulness of the clause level interaction for the task of exegesis. But, then again, this is primarily helpful because the other volumes are structured around the epistolary genre and not gospel narrative. Nevertheless, I think the reader will find that the verse-by-verse discussion is executed extremely well, and Harris, as anticipated, is successful in guiding the reader through the gospel of John with a fine tooth comb. Finally, after each section of the text is thoroughly examined, Harris has provided the reader with a For Further Study section, as well as Homiletical Suggestions that aid the pastor or teacher in constructing a communicational roadmap based on the previous sections.

    As each volume of the EGGNT series is released the bar of exegetical example is visibly raised. Murray J. Harris has demonstrated what it looks like to provide faithful text-centered exegesis, and to do so with communication to the people of God as the primary goal. Harris has provided the reader with a detailed analysis of the lexical and grammatical style and structure of the Fourth Gospel, and he has done so in a clear and understandable way. Not only is this the best volume in the EGGNT series, but this is likely the best resource available on the market for those looking to walk through the Greek text of the Fourth Gospel. If you are a pastor, teacher, or learned laymen this resource will prove itself invaluable to your library. If you are a professor and looking for a faithful guide to send home with your students, who else would you rather have by their side than Murray J. Harris? For these reasons and many, I couldnt recommend this resource more!

    I received an advance review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
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