Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options for Your Child - eBook
Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options for Your Child - eBook  -     By: Dr. Kevin Leman
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Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options for Your Child - eBook

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Product Information

Format: DRM Protected ePub
Vendor: Revell
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 9781493411061
ISBN-13: 9781493411061

Publisher's Description

Every parent wants the best possible education for their child--one that fits their child's unique needs, challenges them to grow, and equips them to succeed. But there are so many options--public, private, and charter schools, plus homeschooling and online schooling--that it's easy for parents to feel overwhelmed and, well, undereducated about the choices. What's more, while one schooling option may be right for one child, it may be challenging for another. And sometimes the same child will thrive in one environment in elementary school but falter in that same environment in middle school.

What's a parent to do?

Parenting expert and longtime educator Dr. Kevin Leman can help. In this practical book, he clearly explains the pros and cons of various schooling options so that parents can make an informed choice about the kind of education that will help their child thrive. He shows parents how to stay involved and engaged with their child's education every step of the way, knowing that the choices they make about school now will reverberate long into that child's future.

Author Bio

Dr. Kevin Leman is an internationally known psychologist, radio and television personality, and speaker who has taught and entertained audiences worldwide with his wit and commonsense psychology. He has made house calls through hundreds of radio and television programs, such as Fox & Friends, The View, Fox's The Morning Show, Today, Morning in America, The 700 Club, CBS's The Early Show, Janet Parshall, CNN, and Focus on the Family, and has served as a contributing family psychologist to Good Morning America. A bestselling and award-winning author, Dr. Leman has written more than fifty books about marriage and family issues, including The Birth Order Book and Have a New Kid by Friday. Dr. Leman and his wife, Sande, live in Tucson, Arizona. They have five children and four grandchildren.

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  1. Anne
    1 Stars Out Of 5
    Ugh... the kind of book that gives homeschooling a bad name
    September 15, 2017
    Anne
    Quality: 4
    Value: 1
    Meets Expectations: 1
    I just read the kind of book that gives homeschoolers a bad name. I feel like I have had a unique combination of experiences. I have taught in several public schools, substitute taught at various schools in several different states, taught at a private school, taught at a homeschool co-op, taught in a GED program at a community college, have tutored K-12 subjects, and have now homeschooled for over ten years. I know that there are strengths and weaknesses of each system. But, one of the biggest problems I see is how the systems--public, private, and homeschooling--interact with each other and view each other. It is this problem that grieves me. I don't believe that there is one right educational fit for all children, but I wish there was more respect and grace shown between these three systems. The book I just read does not help to encourage that.

    In front of me sits a new book by Dr. Kevin Leman, Education a la Carte: Choosing the best schooling options for your child. What this book should really be titled is Education: Valuing Public, Private, and Charter Schools More. My time is short and so I'll try and get straight to the point and explain what my issues with this book are. I know I don't have time to really dig into them. I realized that this book first of all doesn't have a Christian emphasis, but does have a moral slant. Secondly, the author perceives that the goal of all parents is that their children will achieve worldly success and by that I mean monetary success. Lastly, this author was "privileged to sit in on a homeschooling focus group" in which he listened to a group (of what size? where? who was in it? what ages were their children? who was running it?) which made some statements that by no means were representative of the vast variety of homeschoolers who are educating their children today. So, my last issue is how he portrays homeschooling.

    I'll start with my first point. The books I'm aware of by Dr. Kevin Leman's books have all been published by Christian publishers over the years, so I assumed that they were grounded in the Word. But, as I perused this book, I realized that there weren't any Bible verses in it or referenced in it. So, I spoke with a friend who has read several of his parenting books and asked if they were Biblical. She explained that they had some solid, good advice but that they would better be classified as "moral" than "Biblical". But, what that means for the book is that many Christian parents may not find that they agree with the premise of most of his points. I didn't.

    Next point. The first chapters focus on explaining and identifying what parents want first for their children and then what they should look for in a school--note that he really means in a formal school setting. The feeling I got as I read those chapters was that we should all want monetary success and acceptance to the best colleges for our kids. On page 27, Leman writes "Let's be honest, shall we? Each of us wants our child not only to compete but also to be top dog in an increasingly complicated, global world." No, that's not want I want most for my kids!! What I want for my kids is to to love God, to love others well, and to be able to live independently as adults. Then, two pages later, he writes that "the reality is that you have to go to some sort of college these days in order to make a decent buck." No! That's not true either. I talk to people all the time about their jobs and how they got them. But, college isn't always a part of the picture. My husband took a very nontraditional path to his degree and he's a great example that debunks that myth. He's a smart man who works hard and has a lot of knowledge. He does have his degree now, but it is his experience and the knowledge he sought outside of a classroom that really helps him do his job! When I consider my own children, I expect my youngest son to pursue a trade that will allow him to be practical and support himself (and a family) and pursue his interests.

    At one point, there's this statement that tells you about Leman's wife's reaction when he brought up homeschooling to her. This is how he relates the story on page 63, "...I once brought up homeschooling to my wife. "What?" she said, baring her teeth like a German shepherd patrolling the junkyard against potential adversaries. That was the end of the subject for us." When you read a statement like that in the book, you know that the author and his wife do not see homeschooling the way homeschoolers do. I wish he had left that story out of the book. The section on homeschooling is very short and gives a very strange and in many ways wrong view of how homeschooling actually works. He focuses on the drawback he sees of what to do when your child misbehaves and paints the picture that homeschooling parents have to separate the roles of teacher and parent. My experience is that you can't fully separate the two roles. You are always parent and teacher, too. Because as a homeschooling parent, I engage in my kids' lives throughout the day. Ironically, the homeschooling authorities that he quotes are odd ones--two of them I've never even heard of! I have been reviewing homeschooling curriculum for over ten years and listening to parents about the different books they read and I've never come across these two... I could go on and on, but instead hopefully I'll write a book some day that's a better representation of homeschooling.

    I think the last thing that surprised me about this book is that the list of resources at the end of the book is just a list of Dr. Kevin Leman's books. There were no references or explanation of the "homeschooling focus group" he attended, no footnotes explained, or the site that told him Susan Sutherland Isaacs and John Holt are two of the major driving educational philosophical forces behind homeschooling.

    I wish Dr. Leman had written a better book. I would not recommend this book. It is not a broad research based book. Instead, it is a book written based on stereotypes and anecdotal evidence from his own life and experience.

    Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this book by Revell books and very obviously these are all my own opinions.
  2. wheelsms
    Chicopee, MA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Where should I send my child to school?
    September 6, 2017
    wheelsms
    Chicopee, MA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Parents are faced with difficult choices as to what to do about their childs education. Public school? Private school? Home school? Charter school? How early should I put my child in preschool? Kindergarten?

    Dr. Kevin Leman wants to help parents make the right choice for each childs education. His latest book, Education A La Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options for your Child, takes parents back to the core issue. Education isnt just about information, grades, tests, and report cards. It is about mastering principles that transfer into real-life situations.

    In his book, Dr. Leman spends the first eight chapters discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the various schooling options, understanding your childs strengths and weaknesses, how the parents expectations and background fit into the equation, as well as the key traits of the best schools. In the ninth chapter, he helps parents take all of the information and assemble it into a personalized menu to guide them in choosing the right school for their childs success. In the final chapter, he does a Q&A, answering some basic and specific questions parents have posed to him about education.

    Dr. Leman combines personal stories, biblical principles, interviews, statistics, and humorous examples into a very readable and practical book. The book is heavily influenced by Lemans philosophy of birth order as well as his personal conviction that a classical model for education is the best approach. The author is upfront about the strengths and benefits of the Academy he founded in Tucson, AZ. The book felt fairly balanced until the final chapter which obviously tilted the discussion towards the authors personal convictions.

    Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review.
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