Paul and His Team: What the Early Church Can Teach Us About Leadership and Influence
Paul and His Team: What the Early Church Can Teach Us About Leadership and Influence  -     By: Ryan Lokkesmoe
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Paul and His Team: What the Early Church Can Teach Us About Leadership and Influence

Moody Publishers / 2017 / Paperback

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Stock No: WW415647


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Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 224
Vendor: Moody Publishers
Publication Date: 2017
Dimensions: 8.00 X 5.25 X 0.53 (inches)
ISBN: 0802415644
ISBN-13: 9780802415646

Publisher's Description

What can we learn about leadership and influence from Paul?

Most Christians know something of the Apostle Paul’s life and ministry, but what about the incredible team of influencers he assembled and mobilized? Who were they, and how did Paul lead this team to accomplish God’s purposes? Even more, what can we learn from their successes and failures, and how can we imitate their qualities?

These are the questions that inspired Ryan Lokkesmoe, PhD, to write Paul and His Team. Like a church-ministry version of Team of Rivals, it reveals important principles about leadership and influence by showing how this early ministry team:

  • Adapted to cultural, doctrinal, and interpersonal challenges
  • Found common ground with their audiences
  • Led baby believers toward maturity
  • Stayed united despite differing opinions
  • Equipped others for the work of the ministry
  • Conducted their lives with self-discipline
  • Built and maintained strategic partnerships
  • Navigated sensitive cross-cultural situations
  • Persisted through difficulty, frustration, and fractured relationships
  • Persevered when ministry was discouraging
  • Developed leaders to replace them

Whether you are in a position of leadership or are simply a passionate follower of Christ, you are an influencer that God is using to build His church. And while Paul and His Team certainly reveals a lot about Paul's character as a leader, it also highlights both prominent and obscure members of his team to offer a textured portrait of the early church’s influence in spreading the gospel.

Let’s learn from the men and women God used to build the church, letting them shape our leadership and influence as we continue their work.

Includes group discussion questions at the end of each chapter, making this book ideal for a church-staff or small group study.

Author Bio

RYAN LOKKESMOE PhD is the Lead Pastor of Real Hope Community Church in the Houston area. He earned his master's degree in New Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and his doctorate in New Testament at The University of Denver. Ryan is the author of Blurry: Bringing Clarity to the Bible (CLC Publications), and has written Small Group curriculum for LifeWay as well as articles for the Lexham Bible Dictionary. Ryan previously served as the Small Groups Pastor at a multi-site church. He lives in Richmond, TX with his wife Ashley and their two children.

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  1. C. Adams
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    Book Review
    December 20, 2017
    C. Adams
    Quality: 2
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 1
    ***DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED THIS BOOK FOR FREE FROM MOODY PUBLISHERS TO REVIEW***

    Ryan Lokkesmoe's book Paul And His Team: What The Early Church Can Teach Us About Leadership And Influence represents the second book I have reviewed for Moody Publishers. Heather Zempel wrote the book's foreward, claiming Lokkesmoe gives the reader a "fresh" window into Paul's leadership and influence (p. 10). Already there is a problem because one has everything he/she needs to know about Paul's leadership and influence via the Bible (Hebrews 1:1-3; 2 Timothy 3:16-17). Furthermore, God's Word is living and active, the same yesterday, today and forever (Hebrews 4:12, 13:8). Nobody needs "fresh" windows or the like to get insight on what the Bible says about the apostle Paul's leadership and influence. The Bible itself suffices.

    After the introduction, Lokkesmoe states how God has given us all the gift of influence (p. 13). Ironically, he cites no biblical text to support such a claim. Given Lokkesmoe called this concept a "gift", it would make sense if it was one of the spiritual gifts that the apostle Paul discusses in 1 Corinthians 12. Unfortunately, it is not listed. Lokkesmoe states that his book's goal is to "help you in your journey as an influencer" (p. 23). However, nowhere in Scripture are we called to be influencers per se; instead, we are called to be disciple-makers of all nations (Matthew 28:18-20; Luke 24:33-48). Another problem exists here because Lokkesmoe's goal is off-mission compared to what the Scriptures say. While there is nothing wrong with being an influencer, it is not what believers are called to do in a technical sense.

    In the eleven chapters that follow, this book features mediocre sentence structure scattered throughout the book, false teachings, allegorization, narcigesis (reading yourself into the biblical text) and eisegesis (reading something into the biblical text that is not there; Lokkesmoe does this practice by reading his own manmade ideas into the biblical texts). While he does have some decent ideas (i.e., the importance of seeking common ground in chapter one and picking worthy conflicts in chapter five), he has bad (perhaps even heretical) ideas in some places. For example, to conclude the chapter on offstage leadership (an opinion he tries to fit into the biblical texts), Lokkesmoe says, "God has a beautiful purpose for your influence if you'll make it available to Him" (p. 69). Lokkesmoe says something similar in chapter ten when he says, "If we make ourselves available to God, He will do through us the work that only He can do. We just have to trust Him" (p. 173). This type of thinking, which is a false belief, suggests God is powerless to use a believer's influence unless the believer makes his/her self and/or his/her influence available to God, thus elevating the creation over the Creator. What Lokkesmoe seemingly fails to understand is that God is in the heavens and He does what He pleases (Psalm 115:3). It is interesting that Lokkesmoe does not use a biblical text to support any of his heavy emphasis on the believer's needing to make his/her self and/or his/her influence available to God. Moreover, he does not clarify what it means to make one's self and/or influence available to God in a practical sense.

    Finally, Lokkesmoe states some refutable things in the book's conclusion. First, he states the apostle Paul cast a vision for Philemon (p. 196). This is a false statement. The whole concept of "casting vision" is not found in Scripture. Furthermore, websites such as piratechristian.com, bereanresearch.org and christianresearchnetwork.com have posted resources that show how vision-casting is unbiblical. Second, Lokkesmoe, in writing of Paul and his team, states, "...they were also working for spiritual reconciliation -- letting the world know that God loves them and desired so much to be in relationship with humanity that He sent His Son as a means of final reconciliation" (p. 197). This concept of God's desiring so much to have a relationship with humanity is mistaken. God already has a relationship with humanity. First, He created man in His own image (Genesis 1:26-27). Therefore, a Creator/creation relationship exists. Second, for the non-believer, another relationship exists; God is judge over the non-believer. Furthermore, the non-believer, dead in his/her trespasses and sins, stands in condemnation before a holy God (Exodus 34:7; Ephesians 2:1-3; Romans 2:8-10; Revelation 9:2; Revelation 19-20; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10; Matthew 8:12; 22:13; 25:14-46; Mark 9:43; Isaiah 66:24). Needless to say, this is a bad relationship. One would want to have a good relationship with God by being a penitent, born-again believer in Jesus Christ, the only way by which mankind may be saved (Acts 4:12, 16:31; John 1:29, 3:3, 14:6; 2 Corinthians 5:8; Philippians 1:21; Matthew 3:8). Because of that and the aforementioned commentary about God's creating man in His own image, this concept of God's desiring "so much to be in relationship with humanity" is a false conclusion. God already has a relationship with all humanity based on the fact He created humanity. Whether or not the individual is trusting in Jesus Christ alone for salvation determines whether or not the relationship between the individual and God is a good one.

    Overall, this would not be a book I would recommend. It has too much eisegesis, mediocre sentence structure and false teachings to be considered helpful. The only thing this book is good for is research purposes. Aside from that, stay away.

    I hope you found this review helpful. For more reviews like this one, please feel free to visit faithcontenderblog.wordpress.com.
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