Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson
Stock No: WW465594
Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson  -     By: Stephen John Wright

Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson

Fortress Press / 2014 / Paperback

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Product Description

The identification of God with beauty is one of the most aesthetically rich notions within Christian thought. However, this claim is often at risk of becoming untethered from core Christian theological confessions. To avoid a theological account of beauty becoming a mere projection of our wildest desires, it must be reined in by dogmatics. To make this case, this book employs the thought of Robert W. Jenson to construct a dogmatic aesthetics.

Jenson's whole theological program is directed by exploring the systematic potential of the core doctrines of the faith that finally opens out into a vast vision of the beauty of God and creatures: "God is a great fugue . . . the rest is music." Taking Jenson's cue, the account of beauty presented in this book is propelled by a core conviction of Jenson's theology: the sole analogue between God and creatures is not "being" or any other metaphysical concept, but Jesus Christ.

Product Information

Title: Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson
By: Stephen John Wright
Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 206.
Vendor: Fortress Press
Publication Date: 2014
Dimensions: 9 X 6 (inches)
Weight: 14 ounces
ISBN: 1451465599
ISBN-13: 9781451465594
Series: Emerging Scholars
Stock No: WW465594

Publisher's Description

The identification of God with beauty is one of the most aesthetically rich notions within Christian thought. However, this claim is often at risk of becoming untethered from core Christian theological confessions. To avoid a theological account of beauty becoming a mere projection of our wildest desires, it must be reined in by dogmatics. To make this case, this book employs the thought of Robert W. Jenson to construct a dogmatic aesthetics. Jensons whole theological program is directed by exploring the systematic potential of the core doctrines of the faith that finally opens out into a vast vision of the beauty of God and creatures: "God is a great fugue . . . the rest is music." Taking Jensons cue, the account of beauty presented in this book is propelled by a core conviction of Jensons theology: the sole analogue between God and creatures is not being or any other metaphysical concept, but Jesus Christ.

Author Bio

Stephen John Wright is lecturer in Christian theology and Wesley studies at Nazarene Theological College, Manchester in England. He is author of Dogmatic Aesthetics: A Theology of Beauty in Dialogue with Robert W. Jenson (Fortress Press, 2014).

Endorsements

Steve Wright's use of my thinking is both imaginative and faithful - a rare combination. Whether as a constructive proposal or as Jenson-interpretation, I recommend it without reservation.
-Robert Jenson,
St. Olaf College

We have long needed writing that takes beauty seriously and, at the same time, engages with the rich Trinitarian grammar of faith. Wright points us in the direction we ought to be traveling; this book deserves a wide readership.
-Jeremy Begbie,
Duke University

Wright, like Jenson, clearly delights in the God revealed gloriously in Jesus Christ. And just for that reason, his reading of Jenson provides the framing and lighting needed to appreciate Jenson's theology. Drawing attention to Jenson's witness to the beautifully triune God, Wright has crafted a work beautiful in its own right.
-Chris E. W. Green,
Pentecostal Theological Seminary

This lively, well-written engagement with the work of Robert Jenson is neither excessively critical nor hagiographical. Instead, it wisely weaves that work into a conversation with Barth, Balthasar, and their predecessors in order to develop a constructive theological aesthetics. Wright's eschatological reflections are particularly compelling.
-David S. Cunningham,
Hope College, Holland, Michigan

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