Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader  -     By: Karen H. Jobes
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Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader

Kregel Academic / 2015 / Hardcover

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Product Description

Interest in the Septuagint today continues to grow stronger. Despite that interest, students have lacked a guidebook to the text similar to the readers and handbooks that exist for the Greek New Testament. Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader fills that need. Created by an expert on the Septuagint, this groundbreaking resource draws on Jobes's experience as an educator in order to help upper-level college, seminary, and graduate students cultivate skill in reading the Greek Old Testament.

This reader presents, in Septuagint canonical order, ten Greek texts from the Rahlfs-Hanhart Septuaginta critical edition. It explains the syntax, grammar, and vocabulary of more than 700 verses from select Old Testament texts representing a variety of genres, including the Psalms, the Prophets, and more.

The texts selected for this volume were chosen to fit into a typical semester. Each text (1) is an example of distinctive Septuagint syntax or word usage; (2) exemplifies the amplification of certain theological themes or motifs by the Septuagint translators within their Jewish Hellenistic culture; and/or (3) is used significantly by New Testament writers.

Product Information

Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 352
Vendor: Kregel Academic
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 0825443423
ISBN-13: 9780825443428

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  1. Becancour, QC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Discovering the Septuagint: A Tool for the Student of the Greek language
    November 23, 2016
    David
    Becancour, QC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader. Edited by Karen H. Jobes. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 2016. 351 pp. $39.99. ISBN 978-0-8254-4342-8.

    Learning any language is difficult, even ones own. So, learning Greek, specifically that Greek which was used in the first century of our era, can seem like a daunting task. Yet, learning this language is such a rewarding and important pursuit. Rewarding because by learning to read Greek, a whole world of literature is opened to the reader, including not only the New Testament manuscripts, but, with some differences, many of the Greek texts of the early church fathers, and the ancient Greek philosophers. What is more, one will also be able to read the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament that is known as the Septuagint. The Septuagint was the version of the Old Testament that was used by many Jews in the time of Christ, and it became the Old Testament of the early church (being referred to by such great Christian thinkers as Justin Martyr and Tertullian). The most common practice for learning Greek in Seminaries is to introduce the student, bit by bit, to the Greek New Testamentfrequently starting with the Gospel of John, or the Epistles that bear his name. Advanced courses in Greek may look at different, more difficult, books of the New Testament. Now the student of Greek can also interact with the Greek Old Testament.

    Discovering the Septuagint introduces the intermediate Greek student to a number of important texts from the ancient Greek Old Testament. After a short explanation concerning the purpose and best use of the book, and a short introduction to the Septuagint, the student of the Greek language is introduced to many important Old Testament texts. The selections are taken from Genesis 1-3, Exodus 14-15, Exodus 20, the entire book of Ruth, the non-canonical sections of Esther, several Psalms (including Psalm 22), selections from Hosea, the entire book of Jonah, Malachi, and sections from Isaiah. Each of the major sections, which present various selections from different Old Testament books, are edited and introduced by different specialists. This means that the reader of this book is being taught how to read the Septuagint by those who have spent years studying the Septuagint. Each passage is given a verse-by-verse treatment, meaning that we first read a verse in Greek, followed by a detailed explanation of some of the more difficult or nuanced words. Each section concludes with a note about where the verses in that section might be quoted in the New Testament, and a full translation of all the verses looked at in that section.

    This book is a welcome addition to the already enormous selection of Greek study materials. Students of Greek will find in this book an excellent introduction to the Greek of the Septuagint, and an excellent resource, not only for improving their ability to understand Greek, but, also, for improving their understanding of Old Testament exegesis.

    I received this book from Kregel publications, free of charge, so that I could write an unbiased review.
  2. St. Charles, MO
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Discover the LXX
    November 16, 2016
    sheep23
    St. Charles, MO
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader, Edited by Karen Jobes

    This new guide to the Greek Old Testament is a great boon to anyone studying the Scriptures in their original languages. This new work is aimed at those students who have a good grasp of Greek already but need help in discerning unusual and necessary vocabulary. Karen Jobes, author of commentaries on 1 Peter, Esther and a book already on the Septuagint has given us a rich work here. Combining the work of various contributors, Discovering the Septuagint allows the reader to mine the depths of the LXX while seeking aid when words are used 25x or less in the text. The authors give us the parsing of each word and offer some explanatory definitions when things remain unclear.

    Jesse Arlen and Kimberly Carlton point out a fascinating feature in their discussion of the superscriptions the psalms. They write, the superscription found above the psalms would have had liturgical use, and may be original to the OG translationPietersma sees them a series of notes added over a long period of time. (175) Although we cannot be sure if the superscriptions were original to the LXX in their original composition, they served a liturgical and wider use in the aiding of Gods people in worship. Some scholars understand these notes before the psalms as exegetical points, rather than some later peripheral addition.

    One feature of the book that aids in our understanding in the notes the editors provide with certain words and phrases. In Psalm 21:11,with regard to the word metras, the editor states, Probably a temporal reference meaning from birth. The temporal nature of the word gives us a greater clarity in the understanding of the entire phrase, rather than interpreting the word without regard for the entire meaning of the phrase.

    I know this book will help many students in their study of the LXX.
  3. Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Nice introduction to the Greek text of the LXX
    November 2, 2016
    SnickerdoodleSarah
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Discovering the Septuagint - A Guided Reader - by Karen Jobes is a very nice resource for those looking for an introduction to the Greek of the LXX (The Septuagint). There are chapters dealing with selected passages from 9 books of the LXX, in each chapter there is an introduction telling you about that particular book and its translation techniques. Then follows the Rahlfs-Hanhart Greek text of an excerpt from that particular book and a brief examination of certain key words and phrases in each verse, notes on vocabulary and syntax. Then comes another excerpt of the Greek text and the notes on the various versesetc. After all of the selected texts are done being examined, then comes the NETS (New English Translation of the Septuagint) version of the passage(s) so that one may read the whole thing in English. And then finally, if verses from the chapter are cited in the New Testament, they have a table showing where in the NT the passage is referred to and a small summary of its context in the NT.

    I like this study resource pretty well, and I like having an introduction to the language of the LXX. Again, this is just an introduction to the study of the LXX, not necessarily a study resource, Jobes gives a list of recommended reference works on the LXX at the beginning of the book, as well as selected bibliography at the end of each chapter.

    I especially like that Jobes points out that each book of the LXX "potentially gives us a 'snapshot' of what the Hebrew looked like at the time of its translation". But she seems rather contradictory when she then goes on to say that, "In places, the Greek translators of the Hebrew Bible used forms of words and interpreted their text in ways (without being able to foresee it, of course) that were more congenial to the message of the New Testament than the corresponding Hebrew texts would have been" But if the LXX potentially gives us a look at what the Hebrew text looked like in the days of the Apostles, why not assume that the Hebrew text of that day actually said what the Apostles quoted from the Greek? Why do we hold our present day Hebrew text as being the authoritative text with which to judge an older translation of an older Hebrew text? Why not even consider the thought that perhaps the translation that various Apostles used was actually a literal translation of their Hebrew text rather than a heavily interpretative translation?

    Anyway, I do like this resource, and think that it will be quite handy for those looking to be introduced to the Greek of the LXX. I think it would be really neat if they came out with a book doing basically the same thing with the full text of the LXXespecially if they also included the variants that are found in the various Greek OT manuscripts.

    Many thanks to the folks at Kregel Academic for sending me a free review copy of this book! - My review did not have to be favorable.
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