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  1. sam
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    A Baptism Gift
    February 12, 2022
    sam
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Purchased a dozen to give to people who get baptized at our church throughout the year. I'm satisfied and believe it will be very edifying for those who receive it.
  2. Jenn
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Cannons of Dort commentary
    April 25, 2019
    Jenn
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    How important is a document from 400 years, especially when it comes to our understanding of the sovereignty of God? This new book Grace Defined and Defended ~ What A 400 Year Old Confession Teaches Us About Sin, Salvation, and the Sovereignty of God by Kevin DeYoung, will help you understand that it is very important and why you should read the Cannons of Dort yourself. This is a book for not only teachers of the Word, but also all readers of the Word. You will come to understand the importance of this historical document and also the history of how it came to be, which was very helpful and interesting! You will gain a greater understanding of the important distinctions between the Arminians and traditional Calvinists. This is sort of like a commentary for the Cannons of Dort. It was a timely book to come into my hands, as we recently discussed this in our Sunday School class at church. So I gained a great understanding and appreciation of the TULIP and how it came to be from the Cannons of Dort. Only thing is I read it from my kindle version and this is one of those books I really want the hard-copy of, so I will be putting this on my books to purchase list. The reason for that, is because I have so many notes and highlights, I also feel this is one of those books I would reference back to from time to time. This book could also be used as a study with others, as it would have some great discussions from it.

    Here are a few of highlights from the book I made:

    We live in an age where passion is often considered an adequate substitute for precision.

    Reasons to study old confessions written by dead people: they were relentlessly passionate about doctrinal truth, they cared about biblical fidelity, they cared about definitions, and they cared about precision.

    God does not plan the ends without planning the means.

    Divine election is not just an act of sovereignty; it's an act of grace.

    Confidence in our election is not found by rummaging around the decrees from eternity past. Instead, we ought to look for the unmistakable fruits of this election true faith, childlike fear, godly sorrow for sin, and a hunger and thirst for righteousness.

    When we really understand the grace of God in election it makes us humble before God, confident in the face of trials, fervent in love for one another, and steadfast in obedience to the divine law. There should be no such thing as Reformed jerks and proud Calvinists.

    Bad theology leads to despair, and proud theology leads to disdain. But humble, heartfelt Reformed theology should always lead to doxology.

    The cross is about love and justice which is why Dort is wise to begin Article 1 by affirming that "God is not only supremely merciful, but also supremely just."

    What God decrees will come to pass, and everything we enjoy in Christ is rooted in His divine decree. All the gifts of salvation are absolutely decreed by the Father, definitely purchased by the Son, and infallibly applied by the Holy Spirit, to the praise of His glory.

    Faith is not something outside of us that we grab hold of. It is a work that God works in us, producing "both the will to believe and the belief itself."

    Dort understands that sin continues to be offensive to God, even after we have been converted. Contrary to some muddleheaded piety, regeneration and justification do not make God blind to our faults, as if the cross makes post conversion sins invisible.

    Dort has no place for carnal Christianity, but it does allow and even expect there to be contrite Christians. The doctrine of perseverance does not negate repentance, it leads us to repentance. The grace that saves a wretch like me is also the grace that will lead me home.
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