The End of College: Religion and the Transformation of Higher Education in the 20th Century
Stock No: WW471461
The End of College: Religion and the Transformation of Higher Education in the 20th Century  -     By: Robert Wilson-Black

The End of College: Religion and the Transformation of Higher Education in the 20th Century

Fortress Press / 2021 / Hardcover

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Stock No: WW471461

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Product Information

Title: The End of College: Religion and the Transformation of Higher Education in the 20th Century
By: Robert Wilson-Black
Format: Hardcover
Number of Pages: 325
Vendor: Fortress Press
Publication Date: 2021
Dimensions: 9.25 X 6.25 (inches)
Weight: 1 pound 6 ounces
ISBN: 1506471463
ISBN-13: 9781506471464
Stock No: WW471461

Publisher's Description

College in the United States changed dramatically during the twentieth century, ushering in what we know today as the American university in all its diversity. Religion departments made their way into institutions in the 1930s to the 1960s, while significant shifts from college to university occurred.

The college ideal was primarily shaping the few to enter the Protestant management class through the inculcation of values associated with a Western civilization that relied upon this training done residentially, primarily for young men. Protestant Christian leaders created religion departments as the college model was shifting to the university ideal, where a more democratized population, including women and non-Protestants, studied under professors trained in specialized disciplines to achieve professional careers in a more internationally connected and post-industrial class.

Religion departments at mid-century were addressing the lack of an agreed-upon curricular center in the wake of changes such as the elective system, Carnegie credit-hour formulation, and numerous other shifts in disciplines spelling the end of the college ideal, though certainly continuing many of its traditions and structures. Religion departments were an attempt to provide a cultural and religious center that might hold, enhance existential and moral meaning for students, and strengthen an argument against the German research university ideals of naturalistic science whose so-called objectivity proved, at best, problematic and, at worst, inept given the political crisis in Europe.

Colleges found they were losing sight of the college ideal and hoped religion as a taught subject could bring back much of what college had meant, from moral formation and curricular focus to personal piety and national unity. That hope was never realized, and what remained in its wake helped fuel the university model with its specialized religion departments seeking entirely different ends. In the shift from college to university, religion professors attempted to become creators of a legitimate academic subject quite apart from the chapel programs, attempts at moralizing, and centrality in the curriculum of Western Christian thought and history championed in the college model.

Author Bio

Robert Wilson-Black has been CEO of Sojourners since 2013 and manages the organization, working closely with the board of directors and with president and founder Jim Wallis. A graduate of the University of Chicago (PhD, AM) and the University of Richmond (BA, MH), Rob served as a college and seminary vice president for ten years before joining Sojourners in 2009. He is the author of numerous articles, blogs, and podcasts, and a new show launched by Audible. He is an editor of the multi-volume Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers and writes for Sojourners magazine. He advises Crestivex Capital's social impact investing project, previously served as an advisor to the New America Foundation's Smart Strategy Initiative, and serves as a member of the President's Advisory Board of Lynchburg College in Virginia.

Editorial Reviews

"Building on prodigious research, Robert Wilson-Black takes readers under the hood to examine the intramural skirmish between teaching religion and teaching about religion on college and university campuses, a conflict exemplified by the divergent missions between chaplaincies and departments of religion. The End of College, however, is much more than an insider's approach to the topic. Readers with interests ranging from secularization, neoorthodoxy, and the eclipse of Protestant hegemony to the separation of church and state, multiculturalism, and the spiritual crisis brought on by World War II will find Wilson-Black's analysis riveting." --Randall Balmer, Dartmouth College

"Wilson-Black provides a helpful genealogy to understanding the shards of the wreckage left after the former queen of the sciences fell." --Perry Glanzer, Baylor University

"The story of the decline of religious colleges and the rise of religion departments . . . is also very much the story of a nation. . . ." --Ebo Patel, Founder and President, Interfaith Youth Core

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