4 Stars Out Of 5
4 out of 5
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(1)
(1)
(0)
Quality:
4.7 out Of 5
(4.7 out of 5)
Value:
3.9 out Of 5
(3.9 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
3.9 out Of 5
(3.9 out of 5)
71%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
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  1. Ginny Strobl
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great gift for a music lover.
    January 18, 2021
    Ginny Strobl
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Well done, attractive and interesting.
  2. NEB688
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    Text book style, not just for fun
    November 25, 2020
    NEB688
    Quality: 5
    Value: 1
    Meets Expectations: 1
    This was disappointing. I wanted to read stories about the carols and the people that wrote them. I suppose they are there, but this is a dry read in 6 pt. type. It seems to fit better in a music theory or music history class than a casual and fun read during Advent. Excerpt: "The ongoing popularity of psalm singing presented considerable opportunities to the musical entrepreneur... by the curious process of cross-referencing and borrowings familiar to anyone who has dabbled in folk traditions..." See what I mean? If you're looking for hard core or text book, this might be for you. If you're looking for entertainment and light history, this isn't the one.
  3. deb s
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The Carols of Christmas
    September 5, 2020
    deb s
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Love all the history behind my favorite carols and learning about carols new to me.
  4. gcw1
    York, PA
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The Carols of Christmas
    October 23, 2015
    gcw1
    York, PA
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    THE CAROLS OF CHRISTMAS

    A Celebration of the Surprising Stories Behind Your Favorite Holiday Songs

    By Andrew Gant

    Every wonder able the true story behind some of the Christmas carols and where they came from. Andrew Gant offers a history of carols and a background on 21favorite carols that are familiar to all. He uses his musical background to help us understand the stories and histories of the music used with the carols

    I enjoyed the collection of 21 carols that he chose to write about. Including favorites as Jingle Bells and The Twelve Days of Christmas with many of the traditional church carols. The stories are interesting and how the final version of the carol came about will give a new meaning to the carols.

    Andrew offers a copy of the sheet music and verses to each carols to share as we learn more able the carols.

    A book packed with information and useful tool to understanding the origin of a part of our history of a holiday celebrated by millions each year. A great book for sharing with family and friends.

    I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255

  5. SnickerdoodleSarah
    Gender: female
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Could have been much better
    October 5, 2015
    SnickerdoodleSarah
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    The Carols of Christmas by Andrew Gant goes through various popular carols of Christmas and tells some of their intricate, and often confusing, history. You may not come out of the book wiser than when you started it about who wrote such and such a carol but Gant himself warns of this in the intro: "if you occasionally get to the end of a chapter in this book slightly unsure about who wrote words or tunes or bits of either, me too." Apparently we don't know exactly who wrote some of the songs, and many of them were revised from their original written form.

    One of the histories I found particularly interesting was that of Hark the Herald Angels Sing, originally Hark How all the Welkin Rings' by Charles Wesley. Apparently George Whitefield was one of the people who revised the song, one of the verses he changed was "universal nature say 'Christ the Lord is born today!'" to "With th'Angelic hosts proclaim, Christ is born in Bethlehem!'" I found it interesting that Mendelssohn, the man who composed the music that was eventually used for the words, didn't think that the tune was fit for religious songs and that it would "never do for sacred words. There must be a national and merry subject found out" Nowadays it would be hard for me to picture it put to secular words!

    Gant's style of writing is a bit confusing at times, he strikes me as trying too hard to be casual, which doesn't always flow very well in my opinion. Also some of his statements were a bit weird, for instance, his comment, "the most potent force in the shaping of human destinies: luck", and then again, when speaking of the original lines of Wesley's hymn, cited above, "universal nature say" he declares that , "there is something gloriously inclusive, almost pantheisticin Wesley's linesmuch better than Whitefield's replacement." Statements like that seem a bit odd for a Christian to say. There were several songs where I had wished that he would have dealt more with the history of the wording and meaning of the words but he focused on the development/ evolution of the commonly used tune (or tunes) for the carol instead.

    All in all it was a bit confusing, and I think it could have been written a lot better than it is, but it did have interesting tidbits of carol history in it, and the cover is pretty and feels neat!

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from the BookLook blogging program in exchange for my review, which did not have to be favorable.

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