1. Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places: A Conversation in Spiritual Theology Trade Paper
    Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places: A Conversation in Spiritual Theology Trade Paper
    Eugene H. Peterson
    Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. / 2008 / Trade Paperback
    $12.49 Retail: $18.00 Save 31% ($5.51)
    5 Stars Out Of 5 8 Reviews
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    Stock No: WW862976
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  1. Warren, Maine
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Life, Life, and More Life
    August 17, 2017
    Michele Morin
    Warren, Maine
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    We picked raspberries a couple of weeks ago the free kind that grow along the edges of fields and in the company of thistles. They were succulent. I could wrap words around a description of raspberry picking: the gentle encompassing pressure that releases a perfectly ripe berry from its stem; the empty white cone that is left behind on the bush; the scratches on hands and forearms; the sticky red fingertips that carry home the smell of summer and bee-buzzing sweetness. But there is no literary technique, no class in horticulture that comes close to the essence of picking raspberries. For this, one must go into the bushes and experience life in the raspberry patch.

    This is the nature of knowing God as well, for Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places, and to live from the heart what we know in our heads, we must go crashing into the bushes with the thistles, thorns, and mosquitoes. This is the message of this first volume (2003) of Eugene Petersons classic series of five conversations on spiritual theology. The term spiritual theology refers to the specifically Christian attempt to address the lived experience revealed in our Holy Scriptures and the rich understandings and practices of our ancestors as we work this experience out in our contemporary world of diffused and unfocused hunger and thirst for righteousness.' (5)

    Peterson borrows a theme from Gerard Manley Hopkins and expands upon it with engaging examples and sharp Scriptural observations that argue for this truth:

    The end of all Christian belief and obedience, witness and teaching, marriage and family, leisure and work life, preaching and pastoral work is the living of everything we know about God: life, life, and more life. (1)

    He goes on to support his argument through beautifully detailed exposition of three of those ten thousand places in which Christ plays and in which we all go about the business of living our days.

    Christ Plays in Creation

    Creations Firstborn invites believers into a life of wonder. The Greek word kerygma, a public proclamation that brings what it proclaims into historical reality, (53) frames the impact of His miraculous birth and sends readers looking to the two creation stories in Genesis 1 and 2 for help in shaping a Christ-following life. Firmly grounded in time and space, we find that the good news of Jesus life, death, and resurrection are also gifts marked by the sacredness of creation. Johns Gospel affirms in theological poetry (87) that Jesus was indeed at play in the Genesis creation.

    Christ Plays in History

    As creation points our thoughts toward life, history outside the Garden of Eden has been characterized by a series of deaths. Even so kerygma good news! appears in the midst of the mess because the death of Jesus redeems the mess of history and takes the edge off the truth that one day death will come to each of us.

    This conjunction of death, Jesus and mine, is where I begin to understand and receive salvation. (143)

    Peterson takes his readers to Exodus as a grounding text, rich in the history of Gods people, but particularly in the action of a holy (and often wholly inexplicable) God. The Gospel of Mark also deals in history, for with his succinct and economical style, Mark pioneered a new genre in which Jesus is the subject, but the content rather than focusing on the background, emotions, or internal dialogue of the main character is all about salvation, the redemption of every part of history: the worlds and my own.

    Christ Plays in Community

    If the birth of Jesus and the creation of the world ground us in life; and if Jesus death has redeemed history from the stench of meaningless death; then the resurrection of Jesus is the basis for a life lived in community. Jesus resurrection is the final kerygmatic piece that, together with his birth and death, sets the good news, the gospel, in motion and creates the Christian life. (230)

    The spiritual formation that makes community possible is the work of the Spirit, and this is nowhere more clear than in Lukes New Testament writing about the ministry of Christ and the early church with 17 references to the Holy Spirit in his Gospel and 57 in the book of Acts. In spite of persecution and imprisonment, Luke uses the word unhindered (akoluto) to describe Pauls ministry under house arrest. This irony minimizes the obstacles and invites present-day believers, who are constantly tempted to use the worlds means to do Jesus work, (299) into the unhindered life of prayerful obedience, hospitality, and submission to the means and methods of kingdom living. Perfection is the enemy of community and love is the fuel, a I John 4:21-style love that purg[es] [the] imagination of the barnacles, parasites, and grime that have accumulated around the word love so that Jesus and the Jesus story becomes clear. (328)

    Eugene Peterson and Gerard Manley Hopkins harmonize in the challenge to seek Christ in creation, history, and community and in any of the ten thousand places in which He plays. Finding Christ in all of life is the single unifying experience that brings wholeness to our theology and moves us toward a faith that honors the risen Christ and puts His resurrection life on display.

    //

    This book was provided by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company in exchange for my review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 : Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
  2. Cashmere, WA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Immediately necessary for the long haul!
    March 21, 2011
    Crookedlegs
    Cashmere, WA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This is an amazing work which will shake the reader to the very foundations of their ceribrial and experiencial intimacy with the Lord, with His Church, and with His creation. This is not light "bubble-gum" reading, but rather will cause the reader to intermitantly stop, contemplate, pray, and reassess our notions of Christian living in this modern day world with our relevant and loving God.
  3. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    September 22, 2010
    Lori Mcgregor
    Well written. Incredibly insightful. Spiritual theology is a much overlooked theology, but it is wonderfully practical while still recognizing the wonder of the Word and of God's creation.
  4. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    June 17, 2010
    Ed Thompson
    Excellent book. I have given two copies to friends to read with good results. This book is so interesting and full of fresh insights I need to read it again myself.
  5. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    October 3, 2008
    Maurine Doyle
    The greatest thing in the world is to get grounded continually in The Word of The Creator of this world and Christ Plays in Ten thousand Places reaffirms in conversation where we are going and the Why and How as well. This book came to me at the perfect time, thank you Pastor Perterson for the dialouge and Rick McKinely and Rob Bell for introducing me to the works of Eugene Peterson.
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