Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods: A Conversation on Faith, Psychology and Neuroscience - eBook  -     By: Malcolm Jeeves
Back
×
Buy Item InStock9.99$9.99 Retail: $17.99 Save 44% ($8.00) Add To Cart


Add To Wishlist

Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods: A Conversation on Faith, Psychology and Neuroscience - eBook

IVP Academic / 2013 / ePub

$9.99 (CBD Price)
|
Retail: $17.99
|
Save 44% ($8.00)
In Stock
CBD Stock No: WW44278EB

Flash Sale
* This product is available for purchase worldwide.

Have questions about eBooks? Check out our eBook FAQs.

  • Other Formats (2)
Other Formats (2)
Description
Availability
Price
Add
Include
  1. In Stock
    $9.99
    Retail: $17.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $9.99
  2. In Stock
    $19.80
    Retail: $22.00
    Add To Cart
    $19.80

Product Information

Format: DRM Free ePub
Vendor: IVP Academic
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 9780830895625
ISBN-13: 9780830895625

Publisher's Description

The field of psychology, and especially neuropsychology, can be daunting for Christian students trying to find their way. In the face of surprising new research and radical new theories, it is tempting to limit the integration of Christianity and psychology to relatively "safe" topics that one can easily differentiate from matters of faith. In Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods, the highly esteemed professor of psychology, Malcolm Jeeves, insists on addressing the difficult questions head-on.
  • Do I have a soul?
  • How free am I?
  • What makes me uniquely human?
  • Does my brain have a "God spot"?
In this hypothetical correspondence with a student, Jeeves argues that we must avoid false choices in the relation between Scripture and science. Christians need not choose between a "God of the gaps" that competes with science, a "neurotheology" that bases our understanding of God on the latest scientific theory, or a scientific reductionism that claims to have explained God away as a mere function of the brain. Students encountering the brave new world of neuroscience need not view such research as a threat to the faith. With the wisdom of a seasoned scholar, Jeeves guides us down the road less-traveled—the way of integration.

Author Bio

Malcolm Jeeves (CBE, Hon. D.Sc., FRSE) is emeritus professor of psychology at the University of St. Andrews, where he established the department of psychology in 1969. He was formerly president of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and editor-in-chief of the journal, He was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1992 for his services to science and to psychology in Britain. He is the author most recently of (with Warren S. Brown), published in 2009 by Templeton Press.

Editorial Reviews

"This remarkably accessible volume brings a lifetime of scientific engagement at the highest level to bear on the kinds of questions posed by contemporary science in general, and psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology in particular. Although it focuses specifically on those questions raised at the cutting edge of contemporary psychology, its range extends well beyond the bounds of that discipline. As Jeeves comments in the preface, the questions it addresses are ' real questions raised by real students who want to be intellectually honest, to have . . . examined faith.' What results from this honest and informed engagement is the recognition that, far from being in tension with the deliverances of science, Christian faith opens and liberates the mind to grasp the truth at ever-deeper levels. Jeeves avoids the confused assumption that Christians have to pinpoint an essential distinguishing factor between the human being and other creatures, since 'as Christians we believe that . . . what makes us different is not something about us but who we are called to be.' The perception underpinning the book is that God addresses and calls precisely those same creatures upon which evolutionary biology, neuroscience and the rest of the scientific disciplines stand to shed so much light. "While this volume is remarkably wide-ranging in the questions it asks, it also engages in profound and deep-thinking (yet always lucid) analysis. For those cynics who would dismiss Christianity with uninformed or superficial references to the scientific state of play, this volume is bad news. For those Christians, of any age, who fear lest their faith may require them to put intellectual rigor or scientific integrity to one side, it is exceedingly good news. This is a superb book which I vehemently hope--and, indeed, fully expect--will become a bestseller. Every Christian student interested in the fundamental questions of human nature and scientific inquiry must buy it, read it and pass it on to their friends!"
"No one is better qualified to lead a conversation on Christian faith, psychology and neuroscience than Malcolm Jeeves. As lecturer, author and practitioner, he has been central to the discussion for decades, and he brings to this book uncommon wisdom, practical insight and a rare combination of expertise and humility. For anyone interested in what recent innovations in brain science might contribute to our understanding of what it means to be human, this is a must-read."
"This is a bold, timely, remarkable and impressive book. No one should doubt its colossal and up-to-date learning in psychology, neuroscience, evolutionary theory and cognate fields. What makes it especially remarkable is the combination of all this with a sober, realistic and accurate understanding of many biblical passages and theological doctrines. The book engages with many issues that impinge on Christian faith: the existence of the 'soul,' determinism and freedom, altruism, divine guidance, reductionism, evolutionary theory, genetics and a host of such issues. The style, on top of all this, is extremely readable, and is modeled on the dialogical correspondence of C. S. Lewis's Screwtape Letters and Letters to Malcolm. However, these are genuine questions, not hypothetical ones, based largely on real questions raised by Christian psychology students at Hope College (Holland, Michigan) and elsewhere. The upshot is that in the search for truth, Prof. Jeeves argues, there is no conflict between psychology or neuroscience and Christian belief or theology. These are not competitors but complementary ways of approaching truth. This book avoids any bland generalization and patiently explores each source of concern as raised by students. It conveys the careful Christian thought of a dedicated academic career of well over half a century. It has extensive bibliographies. I have no hesitation in warmly and unreservedly commending this marvelous book."
"What is the relationship between the brain and the mind? What about the soul: Does it exist? Is it something other than just the brain or brain activity? Do we have a God gene? If you want to explore possible answers to these and very many other related questions, you will want to read Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods. It offers much to learn and much to ponder. Malcolm Jeeves is a distinguished neurobiologist, at home also with the Bible and Christian and other religious traditions. Jeeves's conversational style is highly didactic, as well as entertaining. A pleasure to read."
"In this capstone to his distinguished career, Malcolm Jeeves--a pioneering cognitive neuroscientist and our wisest thinker about the interplay of psychological science and faith--helps a student wrestle with big questions. The student is fictional, but the issues are real, and these insightful 'letters from Malcolm' speak to the heart of Christian students' engagement with today's science."

Product Reviews

4 Stars Out Of 5
4 out of 5
(0)
(1)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Quality:
4 out Of 5
(4 out of 5)
Value:
4 out Of 5
(4 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4 out Of 5
(4 out of 5)
100%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
SORT BY:
SEE:
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1
  1. Becancour, QC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    October 11, 2013
    David
    Becancour, QC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods: A Conversation on Faith, Psychology and Neuroscience. Malcom Jeeves. InterVarsity Press, 2013. 219 pp. $20.00. ISBN 978-0-8308-3998-8.

    One of the most debated subjects in contemporary Christian circles is the role and use of psychology in the church. As such, when a well-known and respected authority in the domain of neuropsychology, who also happens to be a faithful Christian, writes an introductory book on the subject, one should pay close attention. Such is the case with Malcom Jeeves latest book, Minds, Brains, Souls and Gods. In this book review I will begin by noting the purpose of the book, its intended audience, and the way the book is organized. Then I will give a brief overview of some of the topics discussed in the book. Finally I will note how successful this book was in accomplishing its goal, as well as some advantages and disadvantages of this book.

    The author, Malcom Jeeves, is a highly respected authority in neuropsychology who has been working, researching and teaching in this domain for over 40 years. The primary audience of this book is anyone who is interested in the relationship between the Christian faith and neuropsychology, and who is actively pursuing knowledge of these two domains. Such an audience may include Christian students who are actively pursuing degrees in psychology, those who have recently finished degrees in psychology, or laymen who are interested in these subjects. The purpose of this book is to show demonstrate that there is no intrinsic conflict between psychology and Christianity. On the contrary, it is entirely possible to adhere to a robust Christian faith, and to practice psychology. It is important to note, in passing, that the author presupposes the truth of evolution, and sees no difficulty accommodating his Christian faith with the claims of evolution. Also, the author also adheres to what he calls dual-aspect monism, which is a theory concerning human nature that claims that "there is only one reality to be understood and explained - this is what I would call the ‘mind-brain unity,' hence the word monism. By saying ‘dual-aspect,' I am affirming that in order to do full justice to the nature of this reality we need to give at least two accounts of it: an account in terms of its physical makeup and an account in terms of our mental or cognitive abilities. You cannot reduce the one to the other. (Jeeves, 85. See also, 40, 60.)"

    Jeeves has based the format of his book on C. S. Lewis's well-known book, Letters to Malcom: Chiefly on Prayer, with a slight modification. This book is formatted so as to resemble email correspondence between a well-established Christian psychologist, Ben, and a Christian student, Malcom, who is in the process of pursuing a degree in psychology. The book starts off with Ben writing to Malcom with the purpose of finding out how Malcom is doing in his studies. This conversational format makes this book a fun and easy to read look at the relationship between neuropsychology and the Christian faith. At the same time, due to the fact that it is so easy to read, one must be careful to take the time to consider what is being said. It is all too easy to read right past important points without blinking an eye.

    The book is divided into 19 chapters that cover subjects ranging from current progress in Neuropsychology to the mind-body relationship, from freedom of the will to the distinction between humans and other animals. Other subjects that are also covered by the author include the God-gene, the Gay-gene, emotions, love, language, divine providence and spirituality. The author seeks to show that a Christian researcher does not need to leave his Christianity at the door when he enters the classroom or when he begins his research, and the Psychologist does not need to leave his scientific theories at the door when he enters the church.

    The book includes an appendix concerning the statement of the Scripture Union concerning their hermeneutical principles. I personally did not fully understand why this statement was attached as an appendix. The author has graciously provided a list of books for further reading, for each chapter, in each of the subjects that are covered in the respective chapter. The book also contains endnotes, an index of names, and a subject index, which, of course, make this book extremely useful for research purposes.

    This book definitely attains the proposed purpose. It is accessible for non-psychologists, and succeeds in showing how one can maintain their Christian faith all while pursuing advanced degrees and research in the controversial domain of neuropsychology. As a philosopher and theologian I was personally shocked to see the author attempting to pull highly philosophical subjects out of the hands of the philosophers, and into the domain of psychology. I got the impression that the author was unaware of the fact that he frequently stepped out of the domain of scientific psychology, and into the domain of philosophy. Discussions concerning free-will, the mind-body relation, and morality, among others, are properly philosophical discussions that can, and should, be informed by research from the natural sciences. As soon as a scientist stops his experiments, and begins postulating on the meaning of the results of his experiments, he is doing what is properly called - philosophy. This one negative point aside, I highly enjoyed reading about recent discoveries and advances in neuropsychology, as well as the authors' philosophical views on the meaning of these discoveries for Christianity. The book is written for beginners, and as such, the author does not go into great detail concerning the different debates that he brings up, though he does point the reader towards resources that he can use for pursuing the debates.

    I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is pursuing a degree in psychology, wishes to pursue a degree in psychology, or who knows someone who fits into those first 2 categories. Though the reader needs to read this book with the understanding that they are getting only one possible way of the interaction of Christianity with psychology (see the authors views above), this book is valuable for the insights that the author brings to the tables, and the confidence with which he, as a faithful Christian, interacts with the different domains of psychology.
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1

Ask Christianbook

Back
×

Ask Christianbook

What would you like to know about this product? Please enter your name, your email and your question regarding the product in the fields below, and we'll answer you in the next 24-48 hours.

If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.

Find Related Products

Author/Artist Review

Start A New Search