1. How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth: Fourth Edition / Special edition
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    How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth: Fourth Edition / Special edition
    Gordon D. Fee, Douglas Stuart
    Zondervan / 2014 / Trade Paperback
    $14.99 Retail: $22.99 Save 35% ($8.00)
    5 Stars Out Of 5 5 Reviews
4.8 Stars Out Of 5
4.8 out of 5
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Quality:
4.6 out Of 5
(4.6 out of 5)
Value:
4.8 out Of 5
(4.8 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.4 out Of 5
(4.4 out of 5)
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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Reading, How to Read...
    June 27, 2018
    Sam
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This is a great book for serious students of the Bible at any age and at any stage of their study.
  2. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great book!
    January 23, 2018
    Michelle
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book is really good for learning how to read, study and absorb God's Word.
  3. Cranberry Twp., PA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth: 4th Edition
    October 4, 2017
    Pastor Jim
    Cranberry Twp., PA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Excellent resource. We are using this for a small-group study. It does require some knowledge of the Bible, so is not suitable for a complete beginner. Some of the study members are finding it difficult, as many of the terms and ideas are new to them (hence the need for a study group).
  4. Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Worth the cost!
    January 13, 2016
    bhorgan
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Definitely a must for those who want to interpret the Bible accurately.
  5. 4 Stars Out Of 5
    Great Book, Disappointing Moment
    November 23, 2015
    Toronto Pastor
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    The nature of handling such a broad topic as hermeneutics in such a concise and accessible package requires that there will be availability for picking at what was and was not included. Fee and Stuart note that their handling of Bible translations is intentionally not an exhaustive coverage of English Bible translations. However, their handling of the English Standard Version is surprising. One of the fastest growing and more popular modern translations of the Bible received only two mentions and both of these are in passing. The first mention is simply to add it to the list of formal translations. The second mention, however, is problematic for more than its brevity. As they discuss the nature of formal and functional translations in the handling of inclusive nouns, they parenthetically position the ESV as if it were a renderings of special interest group focused more on the removal of women from Scripture than providing any real contribution to the field of Bible translation. It would seem that such a popular translation would warrant discussion. After arguing that multiple translations are needed to properly study the Bible, it would seem that the ESV might be valued for the exact reason they push it aside; it provides a formal translation for a set of passages that have become almost universally translated with a functional equivalency. Should the authors have been of less prestige than they are, one might be tempted to question the involvement of Zondervan in such an oversight. However disappointing this might be, it is not the purpose of the book on the whole and is not problem enough to render the book beyond recommendation. Those translation recommended by the authors is the NIV '11 with the following statement in conclusion, "If you were regularly to read this translation, and then consult at least one from the there other categories (NRSV/NASB; GNB/NAB; REB/NJB), You would be giving yourself the best possible start to an intelligent reading and study of the Bible."

    We ought not major on minors, but I found this to be a disappointing moment in an otherwise wonderful book. As a side note, Fee recommends the ESV in "How to Choose a Translation For All It's Worth" (2007). His reasoning is the improved accuracy of handling gender language when compared to other formal equivalent translations. Again, it's nothing that I would make a big deal over, but it is certainly not the books finest moment. This is a good book, and the book on translations is even better. Get them both.
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