God's Battle Plan for the Mind: The Puritan Practice of Biblical Meditation - eBook
God's Battle Plan for the Mind: The Puritan Practice of Biblical Meditation - eBook  -     By: David W. Saxton
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Reformation Heritage / Soli Deo Gloria / 2015 / ePub
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God's Battle Plan for the Mind: The Puritan Practice of Biblical Meditation - eBook

Reformation Heritage / Soli Deo Gloria / 2015 / ePub

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Format: DRM Free ePub
Vendor: Reformation Heritage / Soli Deo Gloria
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 9781601783721
ISBN-13: 9781601783721

Publisher's Description

During the seventeenth century, English Puritan pastors often encouraged their congregations in the spiritual discipline of meditating on God and His Word. Today, however, much of evangelicalism is either ignorant of or turned off to the idea of meditation. In God's Battle Plan for the Mind, pastor David Saxton seeks to convince God's people of the absolute necessity for personal meditation and motivate them to begin this work themselves. But he has not done this alone. Rather, he has labored through numerous Puritan works in order to bring together the best of their insights on meditation. Standing on the shoulders of these giants, Saxton teaches us how to meditate on divine truth and gives valuable guidance about how to rightly pattern our thinking throughout the day. With the rich experiential theology of the Puritans, this book lays out a course for enjoying true meditation on God's Word.

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  1. Anonymous
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    A superb book!
    April 11, 2015
    Anonymous
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book reveals the mechanism of Puritan revolution. Biblical meditation is an "atomic bomb" weapon for all believers to live a godly life and to fight against secularism, escapism and mysticism. Pastor David W. Saxton clearly discussed the puritan method of meditation which is the only biblical method of meditation, nothing more, nothing less.
  2. Pastor Josh
    Muskegon, MI
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    An Inspiring and Convicting Call to Meditate on God's Word!
    March 9, 2015
    Pastor Josh
    Muskegon, MI
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Gods Battle Plan for the Mind (Reformation Heritage Books, 2015) is a compelling call for believers to return to the lost art of biblical meditation, and to recognize this as the chief means of spiritual growth in each of our lives. In these 145 pages, Pastor David Saxton combs deeply through the writings of the Puritans, showing clearly and persuasively that meditation, though largely neglected among believers in our own day, has historically been regarded as the most important of all the Christian disciplines, as well as one of the chief ways of discerning the spiritual health of a Christian.

    In the foreword, Dr. Joel Beeke (the president of Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary) likens a Christian who fails to meditate on Scripture with a person who is presented with a gourmet meal but is unable to have the joy and benefit of tasting even a single bite for themselves. A similar distinction is made throughout the book, reminding us that its not enough to only read or hear Gods Word in a passing manner (though both reading and hearing Scripture are important!), but that we must also be intentional about contemplating that Word for ourselves and applying it directly to our lives.

    The author explains that, in many respects, modern Christianity has increasingly become superficial and weak. He adds that we can respond to this growing problem in either one of two ways we can either adapt and concede to the reality of anemic Christianity, or we can return to true biblical spirituality a serious focus on putting Gods Word to practice in ones own experience (1). This latter response which is the only God-honoring response for believers is known as biblical meditation, or, the doctrine of Christian thinking (1-2). With this in mind, Saxton explains The goal of this book is to convince Gods people of the absolute necessity of personal meditation. The book will motivate the believer to begin this work; teach practically how to meditate on divine truth; and guide in right patterns of thinking throughout the day (2).

    The book begins by expressing to readers the vital importance of biblical meditation, explaining, in the words of Thomas Watson, that Without meditation the truth of God will not stay with us; the heart is hard, and the memory slippery, and without meditation all is lost; meditation imprints and fastens a truth in the mind A further plea comes to us from Richard Baxter, that if you would but set yourselves to consider of what you hear or read, one line of a chapter, or one sentence of a sermon, would lay you into tears, or make you groan, or at least do more than is now done (6).

    In the Puritan days, biblical meditation was regarded as the nucleus of the Puritan devotional life, the supreme means of grace, and the most important aspect of private Christian devotion (5). However, its even more convicting for us to consider that when the Lord spoke to Joshua before he led Gods people into the Promised Land (and into battle), that his greatest need was to live by meditating upon Gods word (7), and that very likely, David was called a man after Gods own heart because he meditated (11, emphasis added). With such remarkable God-honoring leaders being led by God into a deeper knowledge of his Word, who are we to regard it with less value in our own lives?

    Equally convicting counsel comes on every page of this book! Here, we learn that true meditation is challenging work, requiring both time and effort on our part, though the reward makes it more than worth the effort. William Bridge highlights this truth as follows: As it is a soul-satisfying work, so this work of meditation to a gracious soul is a most delightful work. What greater delight than to think on that God in whom he doth most delight?.Though it be hard in regard of its practice, yet it may be sweet and delightful in regard to its profit (13).

    We also discover that even those of us whove not been intentional about meditating on Gods Word have nonetheless practiced meditation. The author writes, everyone meditates on something. We either learn to practice and benefit from biblical meditation, or we inevitably allow our minds to wander dangerously through sinful or depressing thoughts (15). More directly, Edmund Calamy chastens his fellow believers for our poorly directed contemplation, first by declaring, Let us mourn before the Lord that we have misplaced our meditation. He then instructs, Now mourn before your God heartily, and go into your closets and bemoan itYou have been meditating all your lives long upon vain things, and have not meditated upon the things of eternity (16).

    After considering further what makes for unbiblical meditation, Saxton looks closely at what Gods Word teaches us about genuine, Christ-glorifying meditation and then turns again to the Puritans, whose comments on these biblical truths continue to enrich our study of this important doctrine. Remaining chapters consider the different types of Christian meditation (occasional and deliberate, with both being important, but daily, deliberate meditation being deemed most crucial by the Puritans), specific counsel regarding how to meditate in a biblical way, the specific benefits of Christian meditation and the enemies (such as busy-ness and entertainment) which are most likely to prevent us from meditating as Scripture exhorts us to do.

    In every portion of this book, we are lovingly and biblically exhorted to make Gods Word the supreme authority of not only our church lives, but our daily lives as well. We are likewise warned that to neglect to do this makes us (to quote R. Kent Hughes) Christians without Christian minds, Christians who do not think Christianly (134). Personally, I have been deeply challenged by both Saxton and the Puritan authors whose works he quotes to intentionally carve out more time not only for reading Gods Word, but for meditating on it as well and I have no doubt that other readers will be similarly convicted in their hearts. On the back cover of the book, an endorsement from John MacArthur encourages that believers should, get a copy, read it, put its principles into practice, and be transformed by the renewal of your mind.' I whole-heartedly agree.
  3. Newell
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: Male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Meditation, not Mysticism
    March 2, 2015
    Newell
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: Male
    The Puritan authors were big on the practice of Biblical meditation and David Saxton has provided a well ordered view of their thoughts on this spiritual discipline in his book God's Battle Plan for the Mind. Far from being a new age mysticism that empties the mind, Biblical meditation is a filling and directing the mind to pondering God's Word. Teeming with quotations from the old masters, Saxton gives us the Puritan's thoughts on guiding their people through this necessary discipline in the Christian life.

    After providing the reason why we should meditate on the scriptures, Saxton defines the practice and shows us how to meditate on the Word of God, and then warns us against some common hindrances to the practice. It is one thing to say "you need to meditate" and move on, but Saxton points out that the Puritans didn't leave it at the command, but also gave practical advice on how to practice mediation and exhorted their people to the good and godly work. Meditation is not the same as a daily reading program, nor is it a study on an unknown or unfamiliar topic, but a concentrated time devoted to thinking upon known Biblical truths and how these truths are to be applied to Christian walk. The section on topics for meditation and why the familiar doctrines are those that are best suited for mediation will prove, I believe, to be a helpful guide.

    Saxton's style works well in a book that where quotations necessarily abound. His writing smoothly transitions from the Puritan quotations to his own observations. Using the KJV, there is a good flow stylistically throughout; quoting authors covering a 400 year period is a difficult task to carry out, but he did a good job making this book very accessible for the modern reader. In fact, books like these show how readable and delightful the Puritan works can be.

    Interestingly, meditation on the scripture is not a problem that is isolated in smart phone societies. The Puritans bemoaned the fact that a lack of mediation was a serious problem in their day as well. I found the advice addressing this problem both stirring and practical. Exhorting their readers 300 years ago on how to keep their mind focused upon God during their busy workday is as relevant today as it was then. It is easy to blame our problems on our technology and think that if we could only go back to simpler times, we would be more spiritual, but sadly, it just is not the case. Our sin nature is the problem, not our apps.

    Overall, this is a very good summary of what the Puritan teachers described and urged in the practice of Biblical meditation and an excellent resource for those who do not currently practice Scriptural meditation and excellent motivation to spur you on if you are already in the habit. Far from being a rigid and uptight practice, this book shows us that meditation is a way to increase our love for Jesus and not only benefits our soul, but becomes a lovely duty as we worship our our great God, with our hearts and minds.

    My thanks to Cross Focused Media for the review copy.
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