1. A Silken Thread
    A Silken Thread
    Kim Vogel Sawyer
    WaterBrook / 2019 / Trade Paperback
    $9.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 33% ($5.00)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 42 Reviews
4.5 Stars Out Of 5
4.5 out of 5
(24)
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(4)
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Quality:
4.8 out Of 5
(4.8 out of 5)
Value:
4.8 out Of 5
(4.8 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.8 out Of 5
(4.8 out of 5)
98%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
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  1. 4 Stars Out Of 5
    Thoughtful & Rich
    May 17, 2019
    Just Commonly
    ". . . God don't waste nothin'. That all things is s'posed to wo'k fo' good." (309 ARC)

    A story of growing up, of taking charge of who you are, but also knowing your heart, A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer takes readers on an emotional journey to of knowing when to let go, and when to hold on.

    "She hadn't been holding to God, but He hadn't let go of her. He was clinging, as tenacious as that silken thread, and He would never let her go." (307 ARC)

    In a historical time of how one's difference can be the catalyst for hatred, as well as love seems almost as relevant now as it was then. The romantic thread may drive the story through, but it's the message of love, respect and integrity that held it together, illustrating a message of God's love for all. It was hard to read some areas due to the racial or social hierarchical discrimination towards some great characters. However, it was well executed and not at all graphic, providing readers a moral sense of right and wrong. In all, a beautiful story rich with historical details profound characters and analogical reasoning.

    "Ain't two people anywhere that're exactly the same. But the differences only matter when we let'em. . . are we gonna let'em? " (207 ARC )

    Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and have not been compensated for this. This is my honest opinion.
  2. Morriston, Florida
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Finding Love at the Atlanta Cotton Exposition of 1895
    May 9, 2019
    Nfam
    Morriston, Florida
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    Laurel Millard is eighteen and dreaming of love and starting a family. She's the youngest of seven children, and she learns that her siblings have other plans for her. She is expected to stay at home and care for her widowed mother. Her feisty mother, however, has different ideas and encourages Laurel to pursue her dreams.

    With the cotton exposition, Laurel sees a chance to meet an eligible man and takes a job as a silk weaver. Here she does meet Langdon Rochester, a wealthy man whose parents insist that he marry or lose his inheritance. Laurel fills the bill as a perfect wife, and he woos her. However, Langdon plans to trade on Laurel's naivety to pursue his wild life style with his friends.

    Willie Sharp is poor. He takes a job as a security guard at the cotton exposition to help his family. He meets Laurel when providing extra security for the Women's Building. He enjoys her friendship and as he gets to know her, his feelings deepen.

    This is a well done historical novel. Atlanta in 1895 is accurately described including the feelings for blacks in the South. People could applaud someone like Booker T. Washington, but feel repugnance for a worker like Quincy, a black friend of Willie's.

    The characters are a bit of a disappointment. They seemed stereotypical. Laurel is naive and captivated by the dashing Langdon, who turns out to be a rogue. Willie exemplifies the poor, hardworking, honest man. Quincy is a foil for the black problems of the era.

    The plot is interesting and moves at a reasonable pace for a historical novel. If you enjoy historical romances with a Christian background, you may enjoy this book.

    I received this book from Waterbrook Multnomah for his review.
  3. Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Historical
    May 8, 2019
    Faye
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    Four lives are changed at the International Cotton Exposition in Atlanta in 1895.

    Laurel is the youngest of seven siblings who support her and her mother, but Laurel wants more from her life than to care for her mother, so she comes up with a plan to go to the International Cotton Exposition as a silk loom operator in hopes of finding a husband. She crosses paths with Langdon, Willie, and Quincy.

    A novel rich in history that follows four main characters and how their lives are changed and shaped by working at the fair. They navigate the societal climate and racial hostility still alive in the South. Laurel, Langdon, Willie and Quincy are all faced with challenges and choices. Laurel's mother is very wise in her faith and dishes out solid counsel.

    I admired Willie for his convictions and values. Quincy has worked hard his whole life, but longs for the respect of his peers despite the color of his skin. While Langdon has lived a life of leisure and has a plan to win his parent's favor and continue his lifestyle.

    The storytelling felt choppy to me, and it was a harder book to read because I didn't much care for one of the characters.

    A historical snapshot of life in the South in the tail end of the 1800's and how the fair brought people from all different backgrounds together in faith and love.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
  4. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Are you living the life God has chosen for you?
    May 5, 2019
    lesacap1262
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I really enjoyed A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer. First off I love historical fiction, I love going back in time, how did people live, what was their daily life like. I also love the christian aspect, so far a perfect book for me!

    .

    This book, I'll admit, was slow to start for me, but once the setting and characters were established I really enjoyed it! Going back to 1895, Atlanta, we meet Laurel, a young girl who is reading and restless. Sunday afternoon, her momma is napping, all her siblings arrive, one by one. Laurel knows something is wrong. What she doesn't know is they have all decided since she was the youngest, the one to hold her mother back, she needs to vow to take care of her for the rest of her life. No marriage, no life, until momma has gone to her glory. Laurel can't believe they all decided her future for her. She loves her momma but doesn't she deserve her own family?

    .

    In a conversation with her mother, Laurel confesses she would like a beau but none of the boys in their neighborhood and church interest her or seem to be interested. Her mother decides Laurel should apply as a silk weaver at the expo coming to Atlanta, the Atlanta Cotton Exposition of 1895.. Perhaps she can get out, meet people, meet a wonderful beau, and enjoy learning to weave silk. Laurel and her mother a excellent at the loom and sell rugs they make for money to support them.

    Also working at the Expo are Willie Sharp and Quincy Tate, best friends for their whole life, both Christians. Willie is hired as a security guard and Quincy as groundskeeper. Willie is thrilled to be hired as his father was taken ill several months ago and Willie needs the money to pay for the convalescent hospital so his father can heal. He is granted by his employer to take the 3 months off and earn excellent pay to put towards his father's hospitalization. Quincy and Willie, best friends forever, but can their friendship last beyond their neighborhood, pressures, prejudices exist in the south, and Quincy is know to get angry.

    Langdon Rochester dislikes work, dislikes his father's factory, but he loves the fancy life and the money. He is told now that he has graduated college, he needs to work at the factory and learn how it runs if he is interested in his inheritance, the factory. Another stipulation, he must be engaged within one year, settle down, stop his wild ways, or the factory will be given to his cousin, who has faithfully been working their for a few years.

    Since they will have a booth at the Expo, Langdon begs his father to allow him to man the booth. Anything to get out of the factory and it's tedious boredom. After Langdon passes the test on knowledge his father grants him his wish. Langdon decides he should take this time to find an impressionable, malleable, naive young girl to woo and marry, to satisfy the obligation.

    Laurel meets Langdon, she thinks she is falling in love. But things aren't always quite right. She also meets Willie Sharp as a guard to the Silk Room where she is working.

    Trouble at the Expo has left questions, racial divisions, destruction, and a thief to be caught.

    Will Laurel and Langdon find a happy ever after, he can certainly take care of her and her mother. Will Willie and Quincy remain friends after racial tension become obvious.

    .

    Such a great cast of characters! I love the subject matter, and I love how she urges us to seek God for these answers, are we living the life God has chosen for us, are we on the path he has created for us?! I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

    I was given a complimentary copy of this book from Waterbrook Multnomah but was under no obligation to write a review. All opinions are my own.

  5. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Engaging, with enough plot twists to keep the pages turning
    May 4, 2019
    Andrea
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Laurel, Willie and Quincy are all exited about working for the exposition, all in different roles. Langdon can care less about it, but his father sends him to work there as well. He then determines it's the perfect place to find a wife to please his mother. A great cast of minor characters round out this story and add depth to it. Engaging, with enough plot twists to keep the pages turning, this book is hard to put down. An enjoyable read and good balance portraying the difficulties between the "whites" and "blacks" even 30 years after the war.

    A complimentary copy was provided by Waterbrook. A review was not required and all thoughts and opinions are my own.
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