1. 40 Questions About Biblical Theology
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    Jason S. DeRouchie, Oren R. Martin, Andrew David Naselli
    Kregel Academic / 2020 / Trade Paperback
    Our Price$20.99 Retail Price$27.99 Save 25% ($7.00)
    4.5 out of 5 stars for 40 Questions About Biblical Theology. View reviews of this product. 5 Reviews
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  1. 1witness
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great little text book
    June 26, 2021
    1witness
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    When I received 40 Questions on Biblical Theology I was excited. I shared that I had received the book with my pastor who only said "good luck."

    This book is thorough, concise, and even devotional. Anyone teaching a beginners course on BT or new to the discipline must have this book. I receive a free copy of this book from the publisher, Kregel Publications, in exchange for an honest review. It is definitely a must have for any one wanting to learn more about Biblical Theology, especially our lay members in the church.

    Having attended a seminary, I still felt that my books were inadequate when I picked up this book. I love that the book's forty questions are subdivided into five headings:

    1) Definition

    2) Method

    3) Illustrations via Themes

    4) New Testament Application of Old Testament Themes

    5) Applications

    Does this book deserve readership? Absolutely. I almost wish this book was a part of a deeper study on the five headings; and definitely wish this book was a book that more seminarians had to read.

    Do I think this book is particularly hard to read? No, I believe it is an easy read; it's concise and straight-forward. It's not written in a text book style, though that is exactly what it is. I give it 5 stars for ease of reading.
  2. PV
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Helpful Book for Understanding How to Read Your Bible
    February 19, 2021
    PV
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    I appreciated the clear answers which the authors gave to each of the questions which were asked. While there might be some questions which readers may not be as interested in, most of the questions focus on topics which people may have wondered about as they read through their Bible: "What is Scripture's Storyline?", "How Should a Christian Relate to Old Testament Promises?", "What is a Biblical Theology of the Law?" At the end of each chapter there is a short summary of the answer, which provides a quick reference for the reader to turn to if they need to be reminded about an aspect of Biblical theology, and some reflection questions, which help the reader see how much of the chapter they remember or help apply the truths which were explained in the chapter to their own life.

    I would recommend this book to anyone who is wanting to "grow in their understanding of God's works and words so that they may better know Him" (14). This book not only answers questions which someone might have about Biblical theology, but it helps remind the reader of the joy which one can have reading their Bible.

    Disclosure: I received this book free from Kregel Academic through their blog review program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255
  3. Jared Garcia
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Perhaps the best one-stop-shop for an introduction to biblical theology
    February 3, 2021
    Jared Garcia
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Perhaps the best one-stop-shop for an introduction to biblical theology is 40 Questions about Biblical Theology by DeRouchie, Martin, and Naselli. This monograph covers the definition, methodology, examples, and applications of biblical theology. It is thorough, concise, and even devotional. Anyone teaching a beginners course on BT or new to the discipline must have this book. I receive a free copy of this book from the publisher, Kregel Publications, in exchange for an honest review.

    Naselli defines BT this way: Biblical Theology is a way of analyzing and synthesizing the Bible that makes organic, salvation-historical connections with the whole canon on its own terms, especially regarding how the Old and New Testament progress, integrate, and climax in Christ.

    Andy Naselli, Jason DeRouchie, and Oren Martin not only tell you what biblical theology is, they also show you how it is done and how they have done it. The most significant contribution of this monograph, in my opinion, is their definition and methodology of biblical theology. Furthermore, the chapters illustrating both how to trace a theme in Scripture and how later Scripture uses earlier Scripture leave you hungry for more examples while also motivating you to do your own similar research. This work should be a required text for any biblical theology course, especially for the introductory level.

  4. Dr Dave
    Williston, FL
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: Male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    A Biblical Theology Primer
    January 26, 2021
    Dr Dave
    Williston, FL
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    If asked would you be able to define Biblical Theology? Better still, would you be able to do that simply? If you answer is a definitive "No," do not feel inadequate. Even the best of theological scholars have a difficult time. agreeing on a precise definition.

    This is the latest in the "40 Questions" series by Kregel Academic and the seventeenth in the series. This volume has a triune authorship - Jason S. DeRouchie, Oren R. Martin and Andrew David Naselli

    But as for a concise defintion, that is elusive. In fact the opening statement in Question 1, "What Do We Mean by Biblical Theology"? begins at this point, "Biblical Theology is a slippery perm..." You know we're in for a rocky road from there,

    Nine questions are consumed with "Defining Biblical Theology." Yet, at the end, there is not an explicit definition. However, despite the divergence away from the central question, there are a handful of questions that the everyday believer may find interesting. One in particular is #16 focusing on Biblical Theology and the Canon of Scripture. DeRouchie provides some intriguing information on the formation of the canon.

    In the end, this book is written by theologians for theologians. It will be well received in the world of academia. This is not a book for the mass of Christianity.

  5. conrade
    Vancouver, BC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Teaching Biblical Theology "Catechism-Style"
    December 30, 2020
    conrade
    Vancouver, BC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    For many people, theology is already a difficult word to make sense of. Some delegate the work of theology to the academics or the learned community. Laypersons too have varied opinions and understanding of the word.. Throw in "biblical theology" and the confusion grows. For those who have been through Bible School, that is not the only term to grapple with. There are other terms like "systematic theology," "pastoral theology," "historical theology," "dogmatic theology," "practical theology" and so on. So what is "biblical theology?" Leave it to the professionals? Not really. Anyone keen in studying the Bible would benefit from the study of Biblical Theology. Put it simply, it is about the big picture of Scripture. Understanding this big picture would keep us from becoming too myopic when we interpret and apply what we learn in our Bible studies. This book helps make the complex terms understandable; the unfamiliar words recognizable; and any difficult concepts comprehensible. It makes the topic of biblical theology more accessible through a simple set of questions and answers. For some people, the word "theology" can itself be labeled as for academics only. This mini-catechism changes all that, showing us that Biblical Theology is for everyone interested in the Bible and what the Bible teaches. The forty questions are subdivided into five headings:

    1) Definition

    2) Method

    3) Illustrations via Themes

    4) New Testament Application of Old Testament Themes

    5) Applications

    Three Thoughts

    ============

    I believe this book deserves wider readership for the following reasons. First, it makes Biblical Theology accessible and helps us understand the big picture of the Bible. From Genesis to Revelation, the Bible is about God revealing Himself to us and Biblical Theology is a powerful tool to help us understand this. Like the authors had said, we are "created and called" to know God and to make Him known. We are created in the image of God and understanding more of God will help us know our very own identity. We are called by God to make Him known so that more people will hear of the saving grace of Jesus Christ. Biblical Theology helps us mine the truths of God's revelation to us via a methodical structure and interpretive techniques that are timeless and effective. In an age of Twitter and SMS Texts, where people try to interpret the world via brief tweets and short texts, we need to avoid trying to understand the Bible through snippets or choice verses. Biblical Theology (BT) is a corrective lens to keep us from such myopic approaches. That is why the authors begin by describing what BT is right from the start. This keeps us grounded in the principles and the reasons for studying and understanding BT. That said, the authors do not mince the complexity of the discipline as well. Right from the onset, they show us at least five different types of BT, which might be confusing at first, but at least readers will have some pre-emptive knowledge of the terms that are to come. Thankfully, the explanations are kept clear and brief.

    Second, Biblical Theology is more about knowing God more deeply rather than the plain academics. It traces the faithfulness of God in the whole Bible. We learn of how the two Testaments "progress, integrate, and climax in Christ." In the book, we are given the broad overview of the whole canon which frees us to dive in deep into any one book without being lost in the details. In other words, we can study the trees without missing the forest and vice versa. This is the beauty of the canon and how the various books reveal the common author: God. While BT might not be made of devotional stuff, it equips us a lens to see God beyond just feeling God's presence. At the same time, we are reminded to avoid becoming reductionistic in the study of God. The whole Bible exalts Jesus but that does not mean we make the entire text talk only about Jesus. BT is a way to help us avoid that reductionistic error. Instead of aiming for one central theme, we learn of "theological unity." BT does exactly that. The reflective questions provide a wonderful lead-in to enable this discovery of God.

    Finally, it is hoped that this book would stir not only greater curiosity in the Bible and Biblical Theology, it would lead to higher take up rate in theological training. The days of sticking to just the Bible text alone are becoming less appealing, especially with the increased availability of resources like this book. This does not mean we excuse ourselves from reading just the Bible. It simply means learning to use different lens and perspectives to understand the Bible as revealed to us. For example, we need to learn to read the Bible not from individualistic lenses that focuses only on our own needs and aspirations. Reading the Bible means reading as a community of faith. With the help of theologians, scholars, and teachers from both the present and the past, our interpretive skills would be expanded and enriched. For the Bible that brings together thousands of years of revelation, it is essential that we learn to see God's revelation not just from the canon, but also from the wisdom of teachers both past and present.

    If you don't have time to go to Bible School, or to read a textbook, or to go to a conference, this book makes a ready reference with salient information on the fundamentals of Biblical Theology. Thanks to the three esteemed professors of theology, we have a book that explains this clearly and succinctly.

    Jason S. DeRouchie (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) currently serves as Research Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

    Andrew David Naselli serves as associate professor of systematic theology and New Testament at Bethlehem College and Seminary in Minneapolis and as a pastor of Bethlehem Baptist Church.

    Oren Martin (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is assistant professor of Christian theology at Southern Seminary and Boyce College.

    Rating: 4.5 stars of 5.

    conrade

    This book has been provided courtesy of Kregel Academic without requiring a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.
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