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  1. Where Lilacs Still Bloom
    Where Lilacs Still Bloom
    Jane Kirkpatrick
    WaterBrook Press / 2012 / Trade Paperback
    $11.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 20% ($3.00)
    4 Stars Out Of 5 26 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW074303
4.2 Stars Out Of 5
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4.4 out Of 5
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Value:
4.4 out Of 5
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Meets Expectations:
4.1 out Of 5
(4.1 out of 5)
85%
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  1. Missouri
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    From struggles to triumph
    March 17, 2012
    dolodd
    Missouri
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    A wonderful story of Hulda Klager, a generally unknown lady from the north west who developed numerous varieties of lilacs. A German immigrant and farm wife, Hulda started fulfilling her lifelong dream by producing an apple that was easy to peel. Tired of fighting to peel apples for her husband's favorite apple pie, she began grafting fruit branches from one tree to another. Each graft produced an apple closer to what she was after. Eventually, she succeeded. These experiments by a horticultural uneducated woman led her to branch out to lilacs around 1905. By 1910 she had created 14 new varieties. Ten years later she was conducting garden tours during the time the lilacs were blooming.

    Where Lilacs Still Bloom takes the reader into Hulda's life of hardships, floods and the death of husband, son-in-laws, three daughters and finally her son. Yet, she kept going developing over two hundred varieties of lilacs from three that her husband ordered for her from Europe. She passed away in 1960 at the age of ninety-seven.

    Rejoice with her over her grafting successes. Cry with her when floods twice totally wipe out her whole garden. Mourn with her when death claims the members of her immediate family. Weep when you read of people from all over who donated plants they had gotten from her "failures" after the last flood destroyed every plant.

    While a listed as a fiction book, Jane Kirkpatrick researched the life of Hulda and made every possible attempt to recreate her life story based on the facts available. The farm house and grounds are now listed in the U. S. National Register of Historic Places.

    I recommend this book to anyone wanting to read of a humble woman's success and to those who have an interest in gardening and the development of different varieties of plants. An encouraging book for anyone who gets bogged down in daily living and who can't seem to find a way to pursue the dream and vision for their life.

    I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
  2. Syracuse NY
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Sharing a Love of Lilacs
    March 16, 2012
    MaureenT
    Syracuse NY
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This is the life story of Hulda Klager, who Loves God, her Family and her Lilacs. A really sweet fast read, that will keep you thinking beyond putting the book down.

    We live everything with Hulda, the good and the bad. This is life, as one would live it, and I love that it is based on a true story. Some parts are just so very very sad, but there is perseverance and life goes on whether we are ready or not.

    I'm impressed on how many lives Hulda has reached with her wonderful fragrant lilacs. She cultivated so many varieties, and shared.

    Jane Kirkpatrick has woven such a wonderful story of both fact and fiction, just as she did with her novel The Daughter's Walk. This is a don't miss heartwarming, feel good book.

    I received this book from the Publisher Waterbrook Press, and was not required to give a positive review.
  3. Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    The Faith of a Gardener
    March 10, 2012
    Lilibet King
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Where Lilacs Still Bloom, the latest novel from Jane Kirkpatrick, is the story of Hulda Klager. From an early age, Hulda had an interest in growing plants and improving them to create new hybrids. Her father encouraged her to work in his apple orchard, and later her husband encouraged her by allowing her time and money to work on flowers. Hulda started with daffodils and then moved to tulips before finding her passion in hybridizing lilacs, starting with a hybrid between local lilacs and French imports. As Hulda copes with tragedies in her life, her garden is her one constant, reminding her of God's grace and glory.

    Hulda Klager was a real woman who lived from 1863-1960, and whose gardens in Woodland, Washington are on the US National Register of Historic Places. Kirkpatrick was able to glean information from Klager's granddaughter-in-law to flesh out the story and bring the history of one of the earliest female botanists to life.

    I found the story got off to a slow start, perhaps because there were so many characters to introduce to the reader. This is not my favorite Kirkpatrick work; I prefer both A Flickering Light and Barcelona Calling. Nevertheless, the book improved as I read further on and came to a satisfying ending, along with providing more information on Hulda's gardens at the end of the book.

    I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group Blogging for Books program for this review.
  4. USA
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Not What You Think It's Going To Be!
    March 9, 2012
    Macy Twain
    USA
    This is a novel based on the life of Hulda Klager, known worldwide for her lilacs. Sounds like a snoozer?

    I wasn't sure about reviewing this title, but I thought "Why not?" I have to say, I'm really glad I did. While I'm not a gardener and plant grafting and propagation is not on my bucket list, not only did I go and research this woman, but I also wanted to order some of her lilacs after reading this book.

    Hulda Klager came to the US from Germany when she was 2 years old. Her husband and his family also immigrated from Germany. They met and fell in love, marrying when Hulda was 16 years old. This book starts with her efforts to develop a hybrid apple that is larger and crunchier than the ones presently growing on her trees.

    Her love of hybridization expanded to her flowers, particularly her lilacs. She really wanted to have a nice creamy white lilac that had 12 petals.

    Lest you think I'm off my rocker this time around, let me say that while the saga of the lilac hybridization is obviously her life's work and a primary storyline, that's not all there is to it. I would be remiss to not offer more detail___

    Early on in the book, Hulda and her family move into her deceased parents' home. This involves also moving her lilacs and replanting her iron shaped flower bed (she made that shape because that was as close to ironing as she wanted to get ). Both homes were in the flood plain, which meant when seasonal flooding came, it was a race to dig up as many lilacs as she could- sometimes 600 or more- and hope they would survive until she could get them in the ground again. Can I just say wow!?

    This book covers nearly her entire adult life- the birth of her youngest, family deaths; the grief and life-altering circumstances that go along, all the while centering around her work to create the varieties of lilacs she was looking for. While not a complete autobiography (some of the character are fictional), the reader really gets a sense of *who* Hulda Klager was; what were her loves; her struggles.

    To this day, Hulda's Lilac Days continue on her Woodland, Washington property, which is now a National Historic Site. There is some information about her lilac breeds here: http://www.lilacgardens.com/

    Absolutely DO NOT dismiss this title because it's not your normal genre. I give this title 4 out of 5 stars only because of the editing. This title is available for purchase May 1, 2012, so I am really hoping they go back and clean up the editing.

    My copy had missing words, although the most bothersome issue was punctuation. Quotation marks were going the wrong way; there were some random periods, and in one spot, there were font issues. I can let a few typos slide, but this copy had enough for it to be distracting. The puctuation issue broke the flow of the reading because a few times, I had to stop and literally read sections out loud with the hope of figuring out what was trying to be said.

    I absolutely will recommend this title, but will have to add a warning to watch out for stray and mis-guided punctuation marks__

    I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
  5. Missouri
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    I Kept Waiting For More
    March 8, 2012
    Robin Prater
    Missouri
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 2
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 2
    I wanted to love this book. Jane Kirkpatrick is such a gifted writer. This book had a great message about having faith during our trials and stepping out of our comfort zone to see what's not always seen by others. It does teach us to pursue our dreams. Those dreams implanted in us by God. With Him everything blooms at the perfect time.

    I found this book to be very slow and I had a hard time staying with it. It just never really captivated me. The opening pages are simply beautiful. Almost poetic, but the story just never rose to my expectations.

    You may read this story and find great blessings. I hope you do give it a try. I'd love to hear your thoughts on this book penned by Jane Kirkpatrick.

    This book was a gift from WaterBrook Press for it's review.
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