Walking with God: Talk to Him. Hear from Him. Really. - eBook  -     By: John Eldredge
Buy Item $9.99 Add To Cart
Add To Wishlist

Walking with God: Talk to Him. Hear from Him. Really. - eBook

Thomas Nelson / 2010 / ePub

$9.99 (CBD Price)
Availability: In Stock
CBD Stock No: WW6146EB

* This product is available for purchase only in certain countries. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Read this eBook on:




  • Other Formats (7)
Other Formats (7)
Description
Availability
Price
Add
Include
  1. In Stock
    $9.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $9.99
  2. In Stock
    $8.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $8.99
  3. In Stock
    $10.99
    Retail: $16.99
    Add To Cart
    $10.99
  4. In Stock
    $13.99
    Retail: $17.99
    Add To Cart
    $13.99
  5. In Stock
    $13.99
    Retail: $19.99
    Add To Cart
    $13.99
  6. In Stock
    $8.19
    Retail: $9.99
    Add To Cart
    $8.19
  7. In Stock
    $14.99
    Add To Cart
    0
    $14.99

Have questions about eBooks? Check out our eBook FAQs.

Product Description

Begin a more intimate relationship with God today. Sharing from his personal journals and experiences John Eldredge takes you with him through a year of his life, where he lives out many of the principles discussed in his earlier books such as: healing of the heart, the fight for joy, and spiritual warfare. Giving you an example of what intimacy with God can look like, Eldredge asserts that everyone can have conversational intimacy with Christ. And if you don't yet, you can soon.

Product Information

Format: DRM Protected ePub
Vendor: Thomas Nelson
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 9781418571412
ISBN-13: 9781418571412
Availability: In Stock

Publisher's Description

ôThis is a series of stories of what it looks like to walk with God, over the course of about a year.ö

So begins a remarkable narrative of one manÆs journey learning to hear the voice of God. The details are intimate and personal. The invitation is for us all. What if we could hear from God . . . often? What difference would it make?

We have a lot to sort through on any given day. A whole lot to navigate over the course of a week or a month. Am I in the right place? The right relationships? How am I going to come up with enough money to do the things I want to do? And what about loveùis this the one? Will it last? What is causing all those fears I keep pushing down inside? Why canÆt I overcome those ôhabitsö that look more and more like addictions? Am I at the right church? Should I even go to church? What is God doing in my life?

All day long we are making choices. It adds up to an enormous amount of decisions in a lifetime. How do we know what to do?

We have two options.

We can trudge through on our own, doing our best to figure it all out.

Or, we can walk with God. As in, learn to hear his voice. Really. We can live life with God. He offers to speak to us and guide us. Every day. It is an incredible offer. To accept that offer is to enter into an adventure filled with joy and risk, transformation and breakthrough. And more clarity than we ever thought possible.

Author Bio

John Eldredge is a counselor, teacher, and the author of numerous bestselling books including Wild at HeartEpic, and Beautiful Outlaw. He is the director of Ransomed Heart, a ministry restoring masculinity to millions of men worldwide. John loves fly fishing, bow hunting,  and great books. He lives in Colorado with his wife, Stasi.

 

ChristianBookPreviews.com

“Our deepest and most pressing need is to learn to walk with God. To hear his voice,” says John Eldredge (p. xi). Further he assumes that “an intimate, conversational walk with God is available, and if you don’t find that kind of relationship with God, your spiritual life will be stunted” (p. 7).

In order to aid us in this type of intimate walk with God, Eldredge offers an autobiographical series of stories which take place during a recent calendar year. In reading Walking with God two very positive traits stand out in the author’s life: sincerity and vulnerability. Eldredge’s passionate desire to walk with God and be what God wants him to be is evident throughout. While one can never truly know the heart of another, all signs point to the author’s desire to be a godly man. At the same time his vulnerability is ubiquitous. He opens his heart to reveal hurts, joys, disappointments, comforts, and struggles -- the same kind we face. Eldredge does not preach from an ivory tower; he has not arrived. He stumbles, bleeds, gets discouraged and fails, yet he perseveres in his passion to walk with God.

This is the good news. The rest of the book is deeply concerning. Eldredge’s working thesis is that to walk with God is to hear God speak. His whole life is wrapped around God’s personal messages and instructions. How these messages are delivered he never actually says, although the implication is that he hears inner voices (the voice of God) actually speaking words about even the minutest of details, although usually in code, not complete sentences. His attempt at biblical support for this position is extremely weak and boils down to “if God spoke this way in Scripture, why wouldn’t He do so today?”

But Eldredge is wrong on many levels. Yes, God spoke often in Scripture to numerous people. In light of time and history, however, He spoke very infrequently and to only a handful of people, and even most of them heard from God only once or twice in a lifetime. Eldredge would have us believe that God is speaking to all His children constantly. Also, in Scripture when God spoke it was concerning major issues often related to His redemptive plan. Of the dozens of examples of God communicating to Eldredge that Walking with God supplies, virtually all of them have to do with the mundane and normal things of life, the things for which God gives us minds and freedoms to choose. In one example (one in which he did not ask God enough questions), he asks God whether he should ride his horse. God says, “Yes.” But Eldredge forgets to ask God “where” and as a result he was injured in a fall (pp. 80-83). The lesson: God must speak to us concerning even the smallest detail, and to fail to seek such instruction could result in serious consequences.

Perhaps the most bizarre message from the Lord followed the death of the family dog. Not only does Eldredge hear Scout bark in heaven but Jesus also complains, “He won’t give me the ball” (p. 125). Apparently good dogs go to heaven and play fetch with Jesus.

Eldredge’s insistence on hearing from God, while having the appearance of spirituality, is a spiritually crippling methodology guaranteed to ensure immaturity. Rather than the careful study of Scripture coupled with analytical thinking and wise counsel (all prescribed in Scripture), Eldredge opts for this unbiblical and childish approach. Consider, what parent wants his adult children to call home for instruction on the routine things of life? Isn’t the goal of good parenting to raise children who can function independently, make daily choices, and live wisely and biblically? So our God, not desiring that we live independent of His intimacy and power, has given us resources, beginning with Scripture, to enable us to live mature and godly lives according to His will. Nowhere in Scripture are we taught to run around analyzing our every feeling and thought to discern if we have heard a word from the Lord. We are taught to live according to biblical principles as we make wise choices and always submit our plans to the will of the Lord (James 4:11-16).

Another area of major concern is Eldredge’s understanding of spiritual warfare (pp. 54-57, 112-113, 124, 147-153, 170-176, 193, 217). Rather than deriving a spiritual warfare theology from Scripture, he looks to experience and the leaders in the unbiblical spiritual warfare movement. He personally commands demons and declares authority over them. He calls them by name. He prays the blood of Christ and casts out demons from inanimate objects and even commands angels. None of these techniques are biblically taught and his attempts to support his position from examples fall flat because of his mishandling of the text.

Without trying to be mean-spirited and in a spirit of love for both Eldredge and those who would follow him, I believe Eldredge spends far too much time examining his imagination, feelings, and subjective thoughts and far too little examining Scripture. The result is a convoluted form of Christian living that is a poor substitute for the real thing. Walking with God is the musing of a sincere man, I assume, but it is not true to the teaching of Scripture. -- Gary Gilley, www.ChristianBookPreviews.com

Publisher's Weekly

For bestselling evangelical author Eldredge (Wild at Heart), Christians are meant to inherit the kind of intimacy that Adam and Eve had with God in the Garden of Eden, but the belief that God only speaks through the Bible hinders a Christian's ability to experience that intimacy. Drawing from a year's worth of journaling about his "walk with God," Eldredge models how talking to God is as easy as checking daily to ask "What are you saying, Lord?" Sometimes when Eldredge queries God, God's response confounds him. For example, when God responds repeatedly with two words, "My love," it takes an accident and a personal epiphany for Eldredge to understand that God wants him to "rebuild [his] personality based on [God's] love." Through everyday life lessons, personal anecdotes, and a lot of scripture, Eldredge shows how Christians can get into direct conversation with God, encouraging readers to ask for answers about anything and everything. Eldredge's story (as opposed to chapter) format is supposed to better help readers "to pause along the way at those points where God is speaking to you," but it results in a lack of real organization and may make it difficult for readers to uncover an overarching theme over the course of a section. (Apr. 15)Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Product Reviews

5 Stars Out Of 5
5 out of 5
(2)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Quality:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
Value:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
100%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
SORT BY:
SEE:
Displaying items 1-2 of 2
Page 1 of 1
  1. Stafford Springs, CT
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Walking With God: Talk to Him. Hear from Him. Really
    December 28, 2014
    Michael Colombaro
    Stafford Springs, CT
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Some very practical applications that many could use to make life all that it could be. John Eldredge has a way with words that one has to stop and think about.
  2. Texas
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Most Important Christian Book in Years
    January 15, 2014
    John Painter
    Texas
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I think John Eldredge's book, Walking With God, is the most important Christian book I've read in years, excluding the Bible, of course. Eldredge's book, from a reputable Christian pastor and counselor, now makes it 'legal' for denominational Christians to say, within their churches, "Yes, I talk to Jesus, and He talks back. I hear His voice, and therefore, I know that He knows me." [John 10:27] - Dr. John Painter
Displaying items 1-2 of 2
Page 1 of 1

Ask Christianbook

Back
×

Ask Christianbook

What would you like to know about this product? Please enter your name, your email and your question regarding the product in the fields below, and we'll answer you in the next 24-48 hours.

If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.

Other Customers Also Purchased

  1. A Personal Guide to Walking with God - eBookeBOOK
    A Personal Guide to Walking with God - eBook
    John Eldredge
    Thomas Nelson / 2008 / ePub
    $11.99
    5 Stars Out Of 5 4 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW4553EB

Find Related Products

Author/Artist Review

Start A New Search