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  1. The Six-Liter Club
    The Six-Liter Club
    Harry Kraus
    Howard Books / 2010 / Trade Paperback
    $17.49 Retail: $23.99 Save 27% ($6.50)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 9 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW577973
4.3 Stars Out Of 5
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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    June 10, 2010
    Theresa
    This was a fascinating story of an African American woman who comes to terms with her past while dealing with her present. Camille Weller's mother was African, and her father was a white American doctor that was helping in the Congo. The storyline jumps between Camille's memories in the Congo in 1964 to her present time in Richmond, VA in 1984.As the story unfolds, so do her memories and they become a huge part of the struggles she deals with, on top of being a woman surgeon in a man's profession. This makes for an interesting read. The profession is difficult enough, and she has to make some moral/ethical choices that put her job on the line. I really enjoyed Camille's character. She is an amazingly strong woman, who has learned to cope with what she was given. She isn't a saint, and makes many mistakes, but that gives her character believability and depth. This is a wonderful story about struggles and achievements, pain and healing, sadness and hope and most of all, forgiveness and love. There is a Christian message that runs throughout the book, but the mainstream fiction reader should have no problem with it. I found this book to be very realistic, and an great read. I'm looking forward to reading more books by Dr. Kraus. I enjoyed his style and he seemed to nail the female character perfectly.
  2. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    June 9, 2010
    Edna Tollison
    In 1984, Dr. Camille Weller is the first black female trauma surgeon at the Medical College of Virginia. On her first day on the job, Camille quickly becomes a member of the elite Six-Liter Club; entrance is saving the life of a teen that had been shot who lost six liters of blood. However, Weller struggles with sexism and racism as she becomes a highly regarded surgeon. She bends rules, but whenever she hits a gender, race, or national origin glass wall, she breaks through by recalling her early childhood in the Congo where her white missionary father and local resident mother died. Raised by her Father's sister that live in America. Camille has nightmares, but she can't remember what they are, she is just really scared every time she hears the phrase "Everything will be alright"This is a medical thriller that focuses on the trials of a young doctor facing several types of prejudices, as well as the horror of being orphaned in the Congo. Camille makes the story line work as she seeks her roots while also making it as a surgeon. At the same time with a deep look inside the OR, beads from East Africa and accepting or disavowing her father's religion, Dr. Harry Kraus provides a strong Reagan Era tale.Dr. Camille Weller begins her first day as an attending surgeon saving a young man who loses six liters of blood: thus her initiation into the Six Liter Club. Expecting a rousing congrats, Dr. Weller soon realizes the stereotype of "woman doctor" still applies--and as a black woman doctor, so do prejudices. A bout of nightmares about her childhood send her on a slippery slope of discouragement and confusion as she deals with hospital politics and romance.Thanks to Rebeca Seitz from Glass Road Public Relations for sending me this copy for review.
  3. Missouri
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    June 9, 2010
    Robin Prater
    Missouri
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Dr. Camille Weller is the first African American female attending in the trauma surgical department at the Medical College of Virginia (where Kraus earned his M.D.). On her first day, she joins the Six-Liter Club - a reference to an elite group of doctors who have saved a patient after the patient loses six-liters of blood. Exhilarated, she decides to do something about the antiquated "doctors" and "nurses" signs on the locker room doors and changes clothes with the "doctors." She'll also blow their prejudices about skin color out of the water. Yet Camille has far more to overcome than preconceived notions about her skin color or sex...she's having nightmares about her childhood in the Congo, a dark closet, whispered words, and strong arms holding her back.I enjoyed this book greatly. We see the life of Camille transform before us. She cannot move into the future without remembering her past and it is her past that is haunting her present. Camille is driven to be the best, and we see her become herself in a man's world. We see her let go of who they want her to be, and become the woman she has been called to be. I must say I fell in love with this character. There were a few parts that made me a little uncomfortable, but I think those parts were really added to define who she was and was struggling to be. Cameille begins to think outside the box when a patient, another doctor, comes to her with a lump in her breast. Together their world's collide in many ways. Love, honor, and friendship are qualities Cameille wants to share with those around her. Much happens in her life and as the panic attacks begin she begins to question where they are coming from. Through all the twists and turns, Cameille does find love, honor and friendship. In the end she also finds a Savior who has been waiting for her to answer.
  4. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    April 14, 2010
    Amy Givler
    This is Harry Kraus' best book yet. I couldn't put it down. He moves seamlessly from the main character's African childhood, with its mysteries, to her current life as a newly-minted black trauma surgeon, with its own struggles. Along the way he manages to say a lot about the search for meaning and identity that young adults go through. I highly recommend this book.
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