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  1. The Midwife
    The Midwife
    Jolina Petersheim
    Tyndale House / 2014 / Trade Paperback
    $10.49 Retail: $14.99 Save 30% ($4.50)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 28 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW379357
4.3 Stars Out Of 5
4.3 out of 5
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Quality:
4.5 out Of 5
(4.5 out of 5)
Value:
4.3 out Of 5
(4.3 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.3 out Of 5
(4.3 out of 5)
89%
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  1. 2 Stars Out Of 5
    Good writing, shouldn't have been an Amish book.
    August 4, 2014
    Martha Artyomenko
    Quality: 5
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 2
    I had previously read another book by this author and even though I am not an Amish fiction fan, I enjoyed her previous book and decided to give this one a try based on it's title alone.

    I found the storyline fascinating, with the line of being a surrogate in the time frame. What I didn't understand and felt was out of place was the lack of follow through on the "Amish" line up. There were too many things that just simply did not add up in the story.

    I guess if you are looking for a story that is not as run of the mill, Amish story, this is a good one to read, but for me, it felt contrived and like the author was trying to write an Amish story, when she should have stuck to a regular contemporary fiction story. It would have been way better that way!
  2. upstate NY
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Interesting
    July 31, 2014
    Virginia
    upstate NY
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Graduate student Beth is a surrogate pregnant with a wealthy couple's baby. When tests show that the baby could possibly have a problem, she flees to a Mennonite community.

    This book takes place in the past (Beth) and the present (Rhoda & Amelia) and the entire story was interesting. I liked how the story was tied together at the end and the relationship between the characters explained.
  3. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Past and present collide
    July 21, 2014
    jsrn18
    Amazing book in which the past and present collide in a powerful drama. The twists and turns in the book kept me intrigued and wondering what was going to happen. The book is told from various character viewpoints in different time periods. The story was never confusing as you switch between characters in the middle of chapters because they all are intertwined. Loved the drama and how the story all fit together.
  4. Plano, IL
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Compelling story
    July 20, 2014
    Bookwoman
    Plano, IL
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    The Midwife is certainly not like many other Amish/Mennonite fiction selections that I have read. It is a wonderful story told by a master storyteller and not fluffy or an easy read in any way. It is a little difficult to follow in the beginning as there are three points of view that are alternately told. But once the foundation is established, the book runs smoothly and the story is compelling. Motherhood, love and forgiveness, particularly self-forgiveness are all part of this powerful story, one that is highly recommended.
  5. Clare, MI
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    This is not a bonnets book, but contemporary work
    July 17, 2014
    Gazpacho
    Clare, MI
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    When you read this book, be prepared for an unusual chronology. The prologue is a glimpse into the future, mysterious and puzzling. It does not prepare you for what's to come, but rather sets the tone for the book.

    In the opening chapters we are introduced to Beth Winslow, a graduate student assigned to Dr. Thomas Fitzpatrick. To assist in the completion of her Master's degree, she has agreed to become the gestational surrogate for the doctor and his wife, Meredith. It's 1995 and soon Beth will be faced with a life changing dilemma.

    At first, I found the shifting chronology to be annoying and confusing. It appeared aimless to me until some of the puzzle pieces fell into place. What kept me motivated to read was the desire to make sense of the opening story. Looking back, I can better appreciate the chronology presented since it was the timing of revealed factors that added to the suspense and urgency. I'm still not a fan of this approach, but in this story it serves to increase expectations. I just couldn't put the book down.

    What genre is this book written in? I can tell you better what it is not than what it is. For example, it is not a typical romance although there is a satisfying conclusion and the presence of some romance. It is not a boy meets girl kind of story. Many of the characters are not who they claim to be. Yet this is a story that does not easily fit into the mystery, suspense, or thriller genres. There is some mystery, some suspense, but those are not the driving force. It has more character development than action, so it is not a thriller or an action and adventure book. This is not even a "bonnets" story, even though the midwife, Rhoda, is Mennonite, wears a cape dress, apron, and a prayer kapp. Being Mennonite is pretty much incidental because the central issues revolve around identity, acceptance, pain, loss, hiding, finding love, and resolution. In essence, it is a contemporary tale that deals with some hard-hitting issues at the core. The thought provoking problems seem to have come out of the author's "what if" file, assuming she has one. I don't think you can pin a particular genre to this book. As I read, the thing uppermost in my mind was a big question mark.

    The segment I found most heartwarming was the friendship Rhoda found in Fanny Graber, the head midwife of Hopen Haus when Rhoda first arrived there pregnant and frightened. A special friendship developed between the elderly Mennonite and the young girl. Rhoda met the Lord because of Fanny. It was the first time she felt completely accepted, wanted and loved. Eventually, Fanny taught her to be a midwife. It was a task Rhoda adopted as her own mission--to care for the girls who came for assistance--even after Fanny had passed on.

    There are parts of the book that will grip you and emotionally wring you dry. Most of the accounts are told in the first person, so that the point of view becomes personal to the reader. Toward the end, the resolution includes some twists in the plot that, in spite of a few clues, will still surprise the reader. That said, I still found more satisfaction from the second reading of the book. Once I had more of the pieces in place in my mind, it was easier for me to follow.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from NetGalley on behalf of Tyndale House Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
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