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  1. The Girl in the Glass
    The Girl in the Glass
    Susan Meissner
    WaterBrook Press / 2012 / Trade Paperback
    $10.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 27% ($4.00)
    4 Stars Out Of 5 38 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW730428
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4.2 Stars Out Of 5
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Quality:
4.3 out Of 5
(4.3 out of 5)
Value:
4.4 out Of 5
(4.4 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.1 out Of 5
(4.1 out of 5)
84%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
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Displaying items 16-20 of 38
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  1. Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Artistic view of Italy
    November 26, 2012
    jnjdet
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    This story has so many levels to it. When I started out I struggled to relate Nora's story to Meg's story but once she ended up in Florence it began to come together. Using a third character, Sophia, it really added to the experience. I really enjoyed the development of the character's struggles and the realizations in the end. It did seem quite poetic. I appreciated the artistic value it brought as well. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys art, Italy, a flavor of romance and mystery as well.

    I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for my review.
  2. Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    The closest I'll ever get to Florence, Italy
    November 24, 2012
    honestvarietybooks
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The Girl in the Glass is written exceptionally well. The book makes you want to jump on the first thing that will get you to Florence, Italy. The stories of Nora, Sofia, and Meg pull on your heart strings more than most book plots I've read. There are many quotable lines in the book that make you think about what's really important in life. The only downfall (like many other reviews have pointed out) it is extremely easy to get confused who's story your reading, probably because the stories of each woman very closely mirrors the others. Sofia and Nora are similar because their father killed their mother. Meg's father never killed her mother but he did some other things that were very wrong such as leaving her family when she was young, having an affair while he was still married to her mom, taking money from his second wife and skipping out of town without letting anyone know where he was. I would love to go back and read the book again. I would read the chapters outlined Nora first, then read the plot line. I would reread it a third time reading the plot first and then the Nora chapters to see how chapter organization affects the book. However, I would only do this if I had a paper book to hold. There were definitely lessons to be learned from the book.
  3. Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Loved the book!
    November 9, 2012
    balboa
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Suspenseful, informative, thought-provoking ---all tied up in one book. I have already passed it on to three of my friends .
  4. Dawsonville, GA
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Great Moral Story
    November 2, 2012
    mmbear
    Dawsonville, GA
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 4
    Meg Pomeroy had always dreamed of Florence, Italy and being able to see the beauty her Nonna had told her about.

    At the time of Nonna's death, she and her mother, Elaine, were in San Diego. Her father and mother were divorced when she was young and at her Nonna's death, her dad promised to take her to Florence.

    Six years later, she still had not gone. Meg worked for publisher's Crowne & Castillo, where she is the editor. Lorenzo Di Santis and his sister, Renata were friends of Meg's in Florence. Both were a team of writing and photograpy. Finally, Meg's father sent her a plane ticket and a credit card to go to Forence and he would meet her there.

    Well, he never showed but she did meet a woman named Sofia Borelli, a writer who claims to hear from a deceased woman named Nora Orsini. Her book was very good and Medg stayed with Sofia for a week.
  5. Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Art of Florence
    October 28, 2012
    kelisni
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    I've never been to Florence before and after reading this book, I feel I had a little taste of it thanks to the detailed descriptions the author gave. Now, some people might not like the minute details that Susan Meissner put into the book. It probably could have been a shorter book...but moving on.

    Meg is an adult and is still feeling the effects of her parent's divorce almost 15 years later. Her father promised Meg's gramma that he would take her to Florence. Fast forward many years and Meg still hasn't gone....until one day she has less than half an hour to get ready and head to the airport to get on a plane to head to Florence.

    Sofia is writing a memoir about her life as a Medici living in Florence. Meg gets a copy of Sofia's first two chapters and falls immediately in love...yet again....with Florence. In order for Sofia's memoir to be published, Meg's boss' tell her that she needs to find proof of Sofia's family history proving she is a Medici. Sofia does not have proof and cannot understand why people aren't taking her at her word.

    When Meg gets to Florence, she realizes that her father is not there and never had been. She is stuck in a foreign country with no where to go...until she remembers that Sofia put her address on her pages for her book. Meg hops in a cab and heads over to where Sofia lives. Meg ends up staying with Sofia and together they experience the art that Florence has to offer.

    Going into this book I didn't have high expectations of it being a Christian fiction novel. And those expectations were met. There were a few quick prayers sent up when someone was in trouble, but other than that, nothing. I felt the focus of the book had nothing to do with God, but with finding out who you truly are and following your dreams because you can do anything. That's not necessarily bad, but as a Christian, God should be the center of our lives and a Christian should be getting to know God more, not necessarily themselves. In the process, He will point out the areas that we need to give over to Him. I would recommend this book if you were interested in Florence, Italy, but not other than that.
Displaying items 16-20 of 38
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