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  1. The Girl in the Glass - eBookeBOOK
    The Girl in the Glass - eBook
    Susan Meissner
    WaterBrook Press / 2012 / ePub
    $11.99
    4 Stars Out Of 5 39 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW27447EB
4.2 Stars Out Of 5
4.2 out of 5
(14)
(20)
(4)
(1)
(0)
Quality:
4.3 out Of 5
(4.3 out of 5)
Value:
4.4 out Of 5
(4.4 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
4.1 out Of 5
(4.1 out of 5)
85%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
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Displaying items 16-20 of 39
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  1. NC
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    An interesting fantasy
    November 29, 2012
    HKW7
    NC
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    This is the first book I've read by Ms. Meissner and I found the eBook, which was in PDF form, quite difficult on my iPod. Perhaps it would read better on a larger device. Overall, although I enjoyed the book, I don't believe I would have persevered in reading it if I didn't have the obligation to do a review. I was really confused by the double storyline for many chapters, then finally figured out what "Nora" was all about. It appeared that Meissner was using the hook of whether the main character would actually get to Florence, but that was not enough to have held my interest until more plot came along. I am, however, thankful that I had to read the book. Once the mystery about the character's father appeared, then I was hooked. I really needed to figure out what was up with him, and was a bit disappointed in the end. Perhaps a sequence will unbury his complete story.

    I also think I has hoping for more Christianity in the story, but was pleased with the "cleanness" throughout the book. The contrast between real and fantasy was also intriguing. I do believe that an escape to fantasy to survive this life's sorrows can be very helpful--especially when I escape into a realm that brings glory to God. I believe that's exactly what my own story writing has helped me to do. When you create your own world, life appears and happens the way you want it to. I take heart at this comment about Nora: "Nora Orsini wanted to imagine that a different life could be hers. So she did. She looked at herself in a mirror and she painted the girl wanted to see." I can relate.

    The imagery throughout the book was very good. I love books that can "talk" you into the scenery. The landscapes and the people came alive for me. I especially like the end where_ well, I won't spoil it for you, but the author knows what I'm talking about. The signature there tells it all and I found it a bit unbelievable how one of my know writers and characters did a very similar thing. I've learned a lot from reading this book. After all, reading is the doorway to writing.

    I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
  2. Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Artistic view of Italy
    November 26, 2012
    jnjdet
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    This review was written for The Girl in the Glass.
    This story has so many levels to it. When I started out I struggled to relate Nora's story to Meg's story but once she ended up in Florence it began to come together. Using a third character, Sophia, it really added to the experience. I really enjoyed the development of the character's struggles and the realizations in the end. It did seem quite poetic. I appreciated the artistic value it brought as well. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys art, Italy, a flavor of romance and mystery as well.

    I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for my review.
  3. Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    The closest I'll ever get to Florence, Italy
    November 24, 2012
    honestvarietybooks
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for The Girl in the Glass.
    The Girl in the Glass is written exceptionally well. The book makes you want to jump on the first thing that will get you to Florence, Italy. The stories of Nora, Sofia, and Meg pull on your heart strings more than most book plots I've read. There are many quotable lines in the book that make you think about what's really important in life. The only downfall (like many other reviews have pointed out) it is extremely easy to get confused who's story your reading, probably because the stories of each woman very closely mirrors the others. Sofia and Nora are similar because their father killed their mother. Meg's father never killed her mother but he did some other things that were very wrong such as leaving her family when she was young, having an affair while he was still married to her mom, taking money from his second wife and skipping out of town without letting anyone know where he was. I would love to go back and read the book again. I would read the chapters outlined Nora first, then read the plot line. I would reread it a third time reading the plot first and then the Nora chapters to see how chapter organization affects the book. However, I would only do this if I had a paper book to hold. There were definitely lessons to be learned from the book.
  4. Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Loved the book!
    November 9, 2012
    balboa
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for The Girl in the Glass.
    Suspenseful, informative, thought-provoking ---all tied up in one book. I have already passed it on to three of my friends .
  5. Dawsonville, GA
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Great Moral Story
    November 2, 2012
    mmbear
    Dawsonville, GA
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 4
    This review was written for The Girl in the Glass.
    Meg Pomeroy had always dreamed of Florence, Italy and being able to see the beauty her Nonna had told her about.

    At the time of Nonna's death, she and her mother, Elaine, were in San Diego. Her father and mother were divorced when she was young and at her Nonna's death, her dad promised to take her to Florence.

    Six years later, she still had not gone. Meg worked for publisher's Crowne & Castillo, where she is the editor. Lorenzo Di Santis and his sister, Renata were friends of Meg's in Florence. Both were a team of writing and photograpy. Finally, Meg's father sent her a plane ticket and a credit card to go to Forence and he would meet her there.

    Well, he never showed but she did meet a woman named Sofia Borelli, a writer who claims to hear from a deceased woman named Nora Orsini. Her book was very good and Medg stayed with Sofia for a week.
Displaying items 16-20 of 39
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