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  1. 4 Stars Out Of 5
    Not bad
    July 27, 2011
    mrs e
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    I enjoyed Money Secrets of the Amish. It's just a shame that what the book had to offer was no surprise to me. Being from Lancaster County, PA, I must admit that a lot of what the book had to offer was already common knowledge for me.

    These things include:

    Using coupons

    Shopping at consignment shops

    Purchasing meats and produce directly from the farmer

    Shopping yard sales

    The one idea I did really like was having a clothing/good swap with gal pals. I have heard of these before but would love to either be invited to one or organize one.

    The author does share some gems of knowledge, but none that I didn't already know.

    I really enjoyed the way the author gives assignments at the end each chapter. She also provides a lot of good resources such as blogs and other books to check out.

    All in all, I would have to admit that this book is valuable and a good read for anyone wanting to cut their expenses.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com http://BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  2. Opelika, AL
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great ideas to live frugally and simply
    July 19, 2011
    Jill Jones
    Opelika, AL
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Lorilee Craker, author of "Money Secrets of the Amish," learned that the Amish weren't just surviving the economic downturn but thriving and decided to find out how they were doing it and whether it would work for everyone. She discovered some tried and true methods the Amish have used for generations that makes cash last longer and helps build wealth. No, it has little to do with the lack of electronic devices or motorized vehicles and more to do with living simply, reusing and repurposing items, sharing with others and being frugal. These are habits everyone needs to practice.

    If you are struggling financially and seeking ways to make every penny count, this book is an invaluable investment. Learn how to live upside down by using it up, wearing it out and making do or doing without. You will see the benefits of delayed gratification and rethink how you give gifts. You will learn the necessity of despoiling your children and shopping secondhand. You will even learn that the best things in life are free and the new bartering system. I'm all for bringing back the bartering system.

    The poor economy doesn't have to put a damper on your finances. Following the Amish ways may just boost your bank account. While the methods in this book may not help everyone, you might find something that will make a big difference in your family's life.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers, as part of their Book Review Blogger Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
  3. Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    This book has awesome practical advice.
    July 11, 2011
    sevencitys
    Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    With great excitement I recently received my copy of Lorilee Craker's ‘Money Secrets of the Amish - finding the abundance in Simplicity, Sharing and Saving'.

    What I discovered, while reading this book, wasn't any secrets, but good common sense and principles of living we need to be reminded of in a world driven by consumption.

    Lorilee Craker is a descendant of the Amish. Just like the rest of us she was feeling the pinch from the financial fallout of 2008. Her freelance journalism didn't bring in what it used too & what it did bring in didn't go that far anymore. Then, inspired by a news segment covering her people, the Amish, and how they emerged from the economic crisis unscathed, she realized it was time to get back to her roots and learn a thing or two about their time-tested approach to personal finances. While the middle-class was wringing its hands over the family budget and the wealthy were weeping over their slashed portfolios, the Amish were content as always, spared from the cares of the world and worldliness. They not only had financial health to support their lives, they exuded a wholeness that eludes so many when the financial bottom drops out.

    In Money Secrets of the Amish, readers go on an "Amish money makeover," learning the choices, secrets, and disciplines that safeguarded the contentment and the coffers of America's favorite plain folk by spending less, saving more, and getting happier doing it.

    Reading Money Secrets of the Amish I thought to myself: I must have some Amish blood flowing through my own veins. The approach is simple, don't spend it if you don't have it. And: don't tie your happiness to what you own (or do not really own, but are paying off monthly incurring massive interest & emotional stress).

    The Amish it seems are ‘so far behind, they're ahead'.

    They repurpose, recycle and reuse.

    Everything.

    They shop secondhand.

    They save, learning to delay gratification.

    They trade each other & they find happiness in the stuff that is for free: each other, time together, family, friendship and games.

    Our Landy has been paid for, for the better part of six years. It is showing some rust & needs more regular maintenance, but it is much cheaper than a R4000 a month car-payment.

    If our kids want something, we don't just buy it for them. We help them devise plans on how to earn the money themselves. How to make or collect and sell stuff. Often, by the time they've saved enough money, their desire might have changed. Then they save for the next thing.

    Money Secrets of the Amish is filled with practical advise like this. How to approach Christmas & gift-giving differently. How to renovate & decorate without spending a cent, or perhaps very little.

    It effectively taps into the frugality of the Amish people and attempts to transfer it to urban living in a different world.

    I'd hoped for less practicality & more spirituality, tapping into the philosophy behind the way of doing things. And I walked away from this book, wondering too if the Amish gave stuff away, like we do. Or if they just share amongst themselves and in that way succeed at ‘keeping it in the family'?

    Having said that - this was a good read. Anyone curious about the Amish & hoping to be challenged about money & finances, how we think about it, how we spend it & how we raise our children, would enjoy it.
  4. North Carolina
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    July 11, 2011
    Kristenph
    North Carolina
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 5
    It seems that the Amish lifestyle is a hot topic these days. In our fast-paced, modern society, we miss what the Amish have: family, community, and simplicity. But although there is a trend towards people simplifying their lives, I don't think many people are becoming Amish. However, the basic frugal principles that the Amish follow can be adopted by anyone. In Money Secrets of the Amish, Lorilee Craker outlines these principles and shows how they can be applied.

    The tips shared in this book are not new or extraordinary. They're just old-fashioned common sense. They include ideas such as avoiding debt, waiting to buy things, reducing spending on gifts, and bartering. But the book doesn't read like a finance book. Lorilee shares stories of real Amish families. For example, she tells of one family who saved $400,000 for a down payment on a farm while raising 14 children!

    The book isn't just about how frugal the Amish are. Along with interesting descriptions of the Amish lifestyle are Lorilee's own stories. Her stories are of how unfrugal she was, and how spending time with the Amish while preparing to write this book, showed her how much she was taking for granted and how many things she could do without. She writes from her heart and isn't afraid to laugh at herself. For someone who has been already been seeking ways to live more frugally, this book probably won't have many new ideas. Even so, I found this an enjoyable book to read and an encouragement to persevere.

    Disclosure: I received a copy of Money Secrets of the Amish to review from Book Sneeze. I was not compensated for the review. All opinions expressed are my own.
  5. West Jordan, UT
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    A Helpful Book
    July 3, 2011
    Jeff
    West Jordan, UT
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    With the past several years of tough economic times, the book 'Money Secrets of the Amish' by Lorilee Craker interested me. My wife enjoys reading Amish fiction, so I knew she would be interested in information from the book as well. I already knew that the Amish live simple lives, and these days we can use all the help we can get in cutting our expenses.

    I thought 'Money Secrets of the Amish' would be a dry, fact-filled book. I was very wrong about the dry part! It is full of humor, and was hard to put down. Along with money saving ideas and hints on how the Amish thrive in their simple ways, there are many humorous stories throughout the pages. Ms. Craker has a fun, flowing style to her writing that made a potentially boring subject a fun read! I have post-it notes on several pages to go back and reread-there are some great tips in this gem of a book. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
Displaying items 6-10 of 30
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