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  1. The Search to Belong: Rethinking Intimacy, Community, and Small Groups
    The Search to Belong: Rethinking Intimacy, Community, and Small Groups
    Joseph R. Myers
    Zondervan/Youth Specialties / 2003 / Trade Paperback
    $11.99 Retail: $16.99 Save 29% ($5.00)
    3.5 Stars Out Of 5 2 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW255007
3.5 Stars Out Of 5
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  1. Jenni
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    September 15, 2008
    Jenni
    There is so much truth in this book. Unlike the other reviewer I have repeatedly been told that the purpose of small groups is to provide community with maybe some learning thrown in. I'm on this site buying a copy for a friend who's been told the sole purpose of small groups is friendship. It's a common mistake.This is a book that says it's about small groups but is really about community and about all relationships and therefore relevant to most of life, individually and as a church.This is one of my life changing books. I hope everyone in church leadership reads it.
  2. SRB
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    January 6, 2007
    SRB
    This book has some good insights, but also some major flaws. The insight I found most helpful is that people experience the sense of belonging in different ways for different contexts - i.e. we connect differently in casual social relationships than we do in close personal relationships - and that churches need to foster connections across the whole spectrum of contexts. The biggest flaw of the book is that the author presents his ideas as a critique of the small group movement, but defines the purpose of small groups so narrowly that his arguments take on the character of beating up on a straw man. His critique of small groups is based on the idea that their sole purpose is to provide church members with a sense of belonging to the community. If that's why a church is doing small groups, his critique is valid. But that's such an anemic view of small group ministry that I find it hard to believe that most churches are approaching it that way. My view of small groups includes the ideas that they are also contexts for helping people discover and use their spiritual gifts, for identifying and training leaders for the church, for providing mutual accountability and support, etc., and thus found the author's criticisms to be largely irrelevant to my own situation.
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