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  1. The Power of a Half Hour: Take Back Your Life Thirty Minutes at a Time
    The Power of a Half Hour: Take Back Your Life Thirty Minutes at a Time
    Tommy Barnett
    WaterBrook Press / 2013 / Hardcover
    $16.99 Retail: $22.99 Save 26% ($6.00)
    3.5 Stars Out Of 5 12 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW773184
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  1. Greeley, CO
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Invest for Life
    January 31, 2014
    darian
    Greeley, CO
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 4
    "The Power of A Half Hour" by Tommy Barnett is an incredibly encouraging and practical book. Barnett shows readers the power that can occur when we invest small amounts of time. He believes that time is our "most significant nonrenewable resource." Our lives are finite and each day that goes by is lost forever. Barnett writes, "You will never get lost time back and nobody can eliminate the results of time well-invested." Before I read "The Power of A Half Hour" I had never thought about time as being a gift from God and, because it is a gift, we have a responsibility to invest it purposefully, productively, prudently, and wisely. This is a great book and Barnett is a a solid writer. You can not go wrong with "The Power of A Half Hour."
  2. Joplin, MO
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: male
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    Not Worth a Half Hour
    January 10, 2014
    mattparks35
    Joplin, MO
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: male
    Quality: 3
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 1
    Honestly, I could not get into it. I read it for about a half hour before putting it down. It is true that a person shouldn't judge a book by its cover, only this cover was catchy but the content disappointing. It is easy to read, but overly simplistic. Now, I did not read but only a few chapters, but it just didn't seem to be worth my time. I am sure the author can understand that. Hopefully this book will be a blessing to someone. If you really struggle with making the most of every minute of every day, then try this book out. Take the challenge that the author suggests by reading a chapter per day for 30 days. Time truly is a precious resources that can never be reclaimed, but it can be redeemed. Blessings!
  3. Blaine, WA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    Helpful but overly simple.
    November 26, 2013
    James
    Blaine, WA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 3
    If we dedicated some time-even thirty minute increments, towards impacting our lives-clarifying our purpose, strengthening our faith, building our character, advancing our dreams, improving our relationships, or changing our world-we would be completely different. We would have a significant impact on those around us and live significant lives before God and others. We would live our dreams and do the sorts of things we wish we were doing now.

    Tommy Barnett is the senior pastor of Phoenix Assembly of God. As a pastor, he has ‘devoted his entire adult life to helping people connect with God and find better ways to live' (vii). What is Barnett's method for helping people achieve their full, God-given potential. It is two things: time and intentionality. In The Power of a Half Hour, Barnett advocates carving out 30 minute time frames for: personal development (part one and two), cultivating spiritual health (part three), moral formation (part four), achieving success (part five), attending to our relationships (part six) and changing the world (part seven). Each section of his book is made up of pithy chapters meant to inspire you to invest your time and intention in growing in that area. The end of the book contains thirty, thirty-minute action plans which help readers put the book's message into practice. There are also questions for group discussion corresponding to each section.

    Barnett offers some good advice: if you want to make, real lasting change to your life, grow spiritually and impact those around you, it will require time and intention. Carving thirty minute increments devoted to personal growth seems like great advice. Barnett also illustrates this with countless stories of lives he impacted through consistently investing thirty minutes (for prayer, for reflection, for relational encounters, etc). Half an hour is a magically time frame because it is short enough to not feel burdensome, and long enough for something substantial to happen. I found lots of practical insights in this book.

    However I did find Barnett's recipe for personal success overly simple. Many of the stories he shared recount thirty minute personal encounters and prayer times. Yet these are only part of the picture. The effect of his thirty minute plan is cumulative. People change because of their continuing commitment to a set of principles, practices, and persons. Barnett understands this (as many of his examples attest) but the thirty minute rhetoric does not bear the freight of his message. I found myself agreeing with much of Barnett's advice while feeling like his account of personal transformation was somewhat truncated by the temporal constraints he puts on each growth opportunity. Perhaps he just finds it easier to think in half hour chunks, but I don't.

    I think there is some helpful insights in here and I found myself touched my several of Barnett's stories, but I did not resonate with the overall tenor of the book but think that his action plan will be helpful for those seeking to make significant change to their lives. I give it three stars.

    Notice of material connection: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
  4. Massachusetts
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Different than expected, but encouraging
    November 10, 2013
    Kyliegirl
    Massachusetts
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: female
    Quality: 4
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 2
    This is one of a number of books that have surprised me recently. I grabbed it because I'm drawn to the idea of time management in half-hour increments - that sounded like something my attention span could handle. The book didn't offer many specifics along those lines, however. Instead, it's a collection of stories of how small choices had big impact in terms of changing the direction of the author's life and the lives of people around him. Something about this book just made me feel good - it was hopeful and optimistic. It reminded me of how fun life with God can be. I underlined inspiring lines and have a bunch of smiley faces in the margins where things turned out better than expected. Whenever a book has that sort of feel-good effect, I like to recommend it.

    (And on the time management side, I do think the suggestion that we consider our days in terms of usable half hours is a good one. Several tasks on my to-do list feel less overwhelming when I consider them in terms of "just get done what you can between now and 2:30.")

    Blogging for Books for provided me with a free copy in exchange for this review.
  5. San Francisco, CA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    30 Power Principles + 30 Minutes
    October 11, 2013
    PT in SF
    San Francisco, CA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 3
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    Pastor Tommy Barnett's The Power of a Half Hour is an easy-to-read (but HARD TO DO) book. He includes many vignettes of people he has met: from ordinary people like Carl the businessman who was arrested in a CIA sting operation; to more famous names like Ken Blanchard, Darlene Zsesch and even Jim Bakker.

    I approached the book with the expectation to do some math and map out my days, weeks and months with 30 minute blocks. Instead, the book reads less like a manual and more like a devotional. Reflections and action steps are included at the end (might've been more helpful to be inserted at the end of each chapter).

    There isn't a ton of theology or Gospel presentation in the book. It's not the main thrust of a book like this. It feels more like a "how-to" or a "Christian-self-help" alternative to the more secular "believe and achieve" titles out there.

    Nevertheless, it is a quick little book of inspiration to get anyone who is goal-oriented on the fast track to follow-through.
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