Current Promotions  

Product Reviews View Product Info

  1. A Place for Truth: Highlights from the Veritas Forum
    A Place for Truth: Highlights from the Veritas Forum
    Edited by Dallas Willard
    Inter-Varsity Press / 2010 / Trade Paperback
    $13.99 Retail: $20.00 Save 30% ($6.01)
    5 Stars Out Of 5 1 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW838455
5 Stars Out Of 5
5 out of 5
(1)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Quality:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
Value:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
Meets Expectations:
5 out Of 5
(5 out of 5)
100%
of customers would recommend this product to a friend.
SORT BY:
SEE:
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1
  1. Oak Harbor, WA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    great book for deep thinking college students
    December 22, 2010
    bookwomanjoan
    Oak Harbor, WA
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The popular opinion today is that truth is relative. It depends upon the interpretation, the perspective. Not so, Os Guinness argues. Truth is fundamental, "without which we cannot negotiate reality and handle life." (40)

    Harvard's motto, Veritas (truth), inspired a group of Christians to host a weekend of lectures and discussions at the university exploring life's most important questions. In the two decades since that first forum more than a hundred universities have hosted their own forums.

    This book presents a sampling of the best of the Veritas Forums over the years. Included are "the most lasting questions and the most compelling responses." There are questions about truth itself and about particular truths, such as the existence of God (of the Judeo-Christian variety).

    Timothy Keller explores why so many people believe in God when evolutionists explained Him away, when dictators outlawed belief in Him and atheists argue for His nonexistence. (His methodical, logical dissection of their views alone makes the book valuable.) Francis Collins (human genome project) reminds us the study of nature is not all there is. McGrath and Hefland agree in their dialogue that they "don't believe it's possible for science to prove anything." (115) Hugh Ross speaks about the reliability of the Bible (especially compared to other sacred texts). Singer and Hare discuss whether there is morality, right and wrong, without God.

    Several other issues are discussed, such as whether robots will ever be human, whether there can be true human rights without religion, Mother Teresa and finding your Calcutta, and one sided Christianity (evangelism or social justice).

    This book encouraged me. Being a Christian does not mean you have thrown your intellect aside as current atheist authors would have us believe. This work is a refreshing defense of the validity of Christianity from intelligent individuals in a university setting and would be great reading for every student.
Displaying items 1-1 of 1
Page 1 of 1