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  1. The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate - eBookeBOOK
    The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate - eBook
    John H. Walton
    IVP Academic / 2010 / ePub
    $8.61 Retail: $12.99 Save 34% ($4.38)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 21 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW13437EB
4.7 Stars Out Of 5
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4.7 out Of 5
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4.6 out Of 5
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4.6 out Of 5
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Displaying items 1-5 of 21
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  1. Tennessee
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    1 Stars Out Of 5
    Massively Disappointed
    September 27, 2013
    Daytona
    Tennessee
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 2
    Value: 2
    Meets Expectations: 1
    I suggest you show my review to the owner of the company. I believe he or she will be surprised.

    John Walton discusses Genesis in terms of the language God used to address the culture at the time. And I agree with this basic premise. God was setting up functions for man, and while he was making materials, the functions were made by God without explanation of how it was done. Agree. The culture and language of the Bible would have been understood in terms of a functional creation. I also agreed with the rest of the book....until I got to the FAQ.

    Look at the second FAQ where it discusses how dinosaurs and fossil "homo" specimens fit it. Apparently, Walton hid this until this section and then postulates that these creatures preceded the 7 days of Genesis....wha???? So God did not make the dinosaurs with the other animals? and the "homo" fossils? are they men or apes???? They came before the Genesis 7 days?

    This book tanks dramatically in the FAQ. Walton has excessively liberal ideas which he hides in the back section of his book. If I would recommend one thing about this book, I would say eliminate this book from your offerings.
  2. Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Unique presentation of the creation.
    September 24, 2013
    walt
    Age: Over 65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    The book is very detailed and sometimes the point is lost in detail. But the ideas put forth are good and the concepts are different from most other writers on Genesis. It requires a slow read.
  3. Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    A Valuable Voice in the Discussion of Genesis
    February 16, 2013
    oldmanchubb
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    The idea of understanding the Bible literally is often a rallying cry of Evangelicals. However, problems arise when we try to mesh scientific data with Biblical truth - especially when it comes to Genesis 1 and 2. Science says the universe is billions of years old, whereas a "literal" reading of Genesis would say it's only a few thousand. Numerous answers to this problem abound and Walton adds a fresh perspective to the mix. He points out that when most people say "I read the Bible literally", what they are actually saying is "this is what the Bible really means".

    Walton believes in the literal truth of Genesis 1 and 2 and his book is a wonderful explanation of what this really means. Rather than impose modern ideas of the cosmos into Genesis, instead we should be asking "How would have the ancient Israelites understood this?" After all, Genesis was written originally for them. His main point is that Genesis isn't so much concerned about questions of age and how humans came to be, so much as God giving the various aspects to his creation a function. Walton works through the six days, explaining the functional aspect to them, as well as explaining how day seven fits in with the ancient idea of Temple and rest.

    The latter half of the book deals with related issues to his proposal - critiquing some of the other main Creation theories, some of his thoughts on Intelligent Design, what science tries to achieve, teaching science in school and how his understanding strengthens our theology of Genesis 1.

    Overall, this is a fantastic read. It's only 170 pages but don't let the brevity fool you - this is deep and very theological/philosophical stuff here. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in how to understand Genesis 1-2 and I hope that this alleviates many faithful who try to reconcile the Bible with modern science. I'm sure this book will cause controversy with some, but I think Walton presents some fairly solid evidence with his 18 propositions.
  4. Blue Springs, MO
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: Male
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Good for starting the origins discussion
    January 7, 2013
    Jonathan Becker
    Blue Springs, MO
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: Male
    Quality: 4
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    I'm going to attempt to be as balanced as possible with my review. Like any book, this one has both positives and negatives, but in this case the positives far outweigh the negatives.

    Positives: Walton is a very respected OT scholar in both evangelical and critical circles, so a book like this one is long overdue. Overall, his discussion of ANE concepts of origins is enlightening and it often challenges long-held assumptions.

    Negatives: At times, Walton seems to be very redundant. If one has read his discussion of the issue in "ANE Thought and the OT" the issues will seem rather surface level. At times he doesn't make his functional/material distinction very clear. In fact, I wasn't quite sure what his view was by the end of the book. Nevertheless, this book will really get readers thinking about issues of interpretation.

    Overall, Walton has made a much-needed contribution to the ongoing origins dialogue.
  5. Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Best Interpretation of Genesis I have ever read
    August 19, 2012
    mark c
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    As a Christian for almost 40 years, I have long struggled with the Young Earth Creation (YEC) account in Genesis 1. It has been the "trip stone" for me when it comes to believing the inerrancy of the bible. It has never made sense to me that intelligent and educated 21st Century Christians believe that the earth and cosmos is only 6000 years ago (or even 10,000 years old has some YEC's seem to suggest); this despite the mountain of geologic and scientific evidence that supports a finding that the world is at least millions (if not billions) of years old. Why would God create a world with characteristics that look deceptively ancient? I have been reading many books over the past few years to reconcile this without success. Walton's book is the first scholarly analysis of Genesis 1 that makes sense to me.

    I don't know why Walton's book has not obtained more publicity in the Christian community. it think it is a must read for all Christians, particularly those who are espousing the YEC view to students or others.
Displaying items 1-5 of 21
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