Fresh Air: The Holy Spirit for an Inspired Life  -     By: Jack Levison
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Fresh Air: The Holy Spirit for an Inspired Life

Paraclete Press / 2012 / Paperback

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Product Description

In the Bible, the Holy Spirit staggers us with its unexpectedness. The Holy Spirit is not just about speaking in tongues, spiritual gifts or "fruits"-but also about our deepest breath and our highest human aspirations. Popular teacher Jack Levison brings a scholar's knowledge of this complicated biblical topic to a wide audience that crosses all denominational boundaries.

His new book aims to do nothing less than clarify 2,000 years of confusion on the topic of who the Holy Spirit is, and why it matters. Provocative and life-changing, Fresh Air combines moving personal anecdotes, rich biblical studies, and practical strategies for experiencing the daily presence of the Holy Spirit. In brief chapters, the book finds the presence of the Holy Spirit where we least expect it-in human breathing, in social transformation, in community, in hostile situations, and in serious learning. Fresh Air will unsettle and invigorate readers poised for a fresh experience of an ancient, confusing topic.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 224
Vendor: Paraclete Press
Publication Date: 2012
Dimensions: 8.00 X 5.38 (inches)
ISBN: 1612610684
ISBN-13: 9781612610689
Availability: In Stock

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Publisher's Description

In the Bible, the Holy Spirit staggers us with its unexpectedness. The Holy Spirit is not just about speaking in tongues, spiritual gifts or "fruits"—but also about our deepest breath and our highest human aspirations. Popular teacher Jack Levison brings a scholar’s knowledge of this complicated biblical topic to a wide audience that crosses all denominational boundaries. His new book aims to do nothing less than clarify 2,000 years of confusion on the topic of who the Holy Spirit is, and why it matters. Provocative and life-changing, Fresh Air combines moving personal anecdotes, rich biblical studies, and practical strategies for experiencing the daily presence of the Holy Spirit. In brief chapters, the book finds the presence of the Holy Spirit where we least expect it—in human breathing, in social transformation, in community, in hostile situations, and in serious learning. Fresh Air will unsettle and invigorate readers poised for a fresh experience of an ancient, confusing topic.

Visit http://bit.ly/FreshAirDiscussion for an excellect discussion guide from the author.

Author Bio

Jack Levison teaches at Seattle Pacific University. The author of many books and articles, he has won major national and international awards for his scholarship. Scot McKnight, author of The Jesus Creed, called Levison’s Filled with the Spirit "the benchmark and starting point for all future studies of the Spirit," and Walter Brueggemann hailed it as "inspired."


 

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  1. Gender: male
    2 Stars Out Of 5
    What happened to the Person?
    July 8, 2013
    LifeVerse
    Gender: male
    Quality: 2
    Value: 1
    Meets Expectations: 1
    As an evangelical, I was quite amazed that a Wheaton College graduate would choose to lowercase "holy spirit," but after a few pages realized that the author has left his evangelicalism behind, for early on he assures the reader that "I'll ask you to recognize that the breath in you is spirit-breath . . . You'll learn that simplicity is essential to learning to breathe again." This sort of writing, this fuzzy brand of academic/devotional fluff that sounds like it belongs on a Hallmark card, is familiar to me, as I watched it mesmerize the liberal churches thirty years ago, and apparently is now the rage at colleges that used to be reliably evangelical. (Those colleges are likewise playing "catch-up" on feminism, homosexuality, the environment, etc.)

    I must admit up-front that I am amazed this was written by a Wheaton College alumnus, given Wheaton's reputation for being solidly evangelical. Choosing to lowercase "holy spirit" is something that would get the attention of a college sophomore who has never actually been exposed to rich theology and would not recognize it if she saw it. The author's explanation of this quirk is, frankly, nonsense, unless the reader is gullible enough to assume that the author really does understand Greek and Hebrew better than the thousands of other Bible scholars who have chosen to cap "Holy Spirit." According to the author, "every interpreter, myself included, should preserve the magnificence and the breadth of the breath that animates all people." He doesn't provide a clue as to why lowercasing "holy spirit" preserves the "magnificence," since if something is magnificent we would be more inclined to cap it. I suspect that the lowercasing of "spirit" is a marketing gimmick - i.e, he and the publisher thought it would hook some trendy readers' attention - imagine, a book on the third Person of the Holy Trinity, the Holy Spirit - and the author lowercases it! Not being of a gimmicky nature, I found it tedious and pretentious.

    Much more disturbing is that the author departs from two thousand years of Christian tradition in claiming that the Spirit (I choose to cap it myself, thanks) "animates all people," for the Bible makes it clear that it animates God's people, i.e., Christians., which is why Paul refers to the "Spirit of adoption" (Rom 8:15) that makes believers into sons and daughters of God. In fact, though the book does not precisely deny that the Spirit is a Person, the book wanders into the vague "spiritual but not religious" territory that so many people inhabit today, with this sense that something "spiritual" is going on at any time of heightened emotion. Typical of the liberal view of God, the book doesn't present Christians being "filled with" the Spirit nor in any sort of intimate bond with the Spirit - the spirit serves merely as a tag for "I really felt something - must be the spirit!" Typical of liberal theology, this spirit tends to nudge people into activism for liberal causes. (FYI: the author wrote a blatantly pro-gay editorial for the very liberal Huffington Post in November 2012, urging the people in Maine, Washington, and Minnesota to "vote their conscience" by approving of same-sex "marriage" in those states. In the article his interpretation of Paul's Letter to the Romans, which contains a much-quoted passage condemning homosexuality, is completely unorthodox and completely approving of homosexuality.)

    I did manage to suffer through to the end. The book takes a close look at some Bible passages that refer to the Spirit, but the author ventures far from sound theology, as the examples I referred to earlier demonstrate. Aside from this, the writing is generally dry, and the author's frequent attempts to wax poetic seem forced - no doubt the result of assuming that a roomful of nineteen-year-olds will hang on his every word. The personal anecdotes become annoying also. I suppose these are attempts to prove to the reader that the author is a "regular guy" as well as an academic genius, but in a book on the Spirit, I would prefer that the author get himself completely off the stage and focus on the real subject. Autobiographies of ex-evangelical professors do not interest me, but the Spirit definitely does.

    If you are a charismatic/Pentecostal Christian, or are at least "open" about the gifts of the Spirit, you will be amazed at what the book does NOT cover. A book the Spirit with no reference to speaking in tongues? Healing? Prophecy? I am not a charismatic myself, yet I was frankly horrified that book on the Spirit, even one by a liberal academic, could ignore the gifts of the Spirit. It says a great deal about the author's background (PhD from the ultra-liberal Duke Divinity School) that this key area of theology goes unexplored. And, curiously he devotes a huge amount of space to the Spirit in the story of Daniel - despite the fact that the Book of Daniel makes no direct reference to the Holy Spirit.

    If you want a good book on the Holy Spirit, plenty are available, and, thankfully, they all capitalize Holy Spirit because they regard the Spirit as a Person, the third Person of the Trinity, and a Person with whom a Christian relates, not just some vague "feeling" that something "spiritual" or "inspired" is taking place, as if watching a pretty sunset is an experience of "the spirit." Some of the books I list here are academic in nature, some more laity-oriented. The most readable for the non-theologian, naturally, is Billy Graham's The Holy Spirit: Activating God's Power in Your Life, also R. A. Torrey's classic The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit. If you want something written more recently, Francis Chan's Forgotten God is quite good, and Chan is an academic who does not write like an academic. R. C. Sproul's The Mystery of the Holy Spirit is brief and, like all Sproul's books, excellent and highly readable, ditto for John Stott's Baptism and Fullness: The Work of the Holy Spirit Today. J. Rodman Williams was one of the best writers in the charismatic tradition, and his book Salvation, the Holy Spirit, and Christian Living is a classic, along with Chuck Smith's Living Water. All these authors wrote with a view to explaining (within the limitation of human language, obviously) what the Bible and the Christian tradition teach about the Spirit. Levison's book, alas, is typical of so many books written by doubting "evangelicals" who have one foot (as he admits) in the mainline/liberal camp (also married to a committed feminist), and they write with the goal of being loved and accepted by that camp, despite it being obvious that the liberal churches long ago chose not to accept the Bible "as is," but to use it as merely a tool in their liberal social agenda, and whose theology tends to be loosely "spiritual but not religious." Religious authors inevitably go amiss when the aim of their writings is to curry favor with a particular audience, for the goal of any book claiming to be Christian is to glorify God and enable the reader to grow in love with him. I hope this won't sound harsh, but in all honesty I never got the slightest hint in this Levison book that the author had ever himself had a real encounter with the Spirit, which perhaps lies at the root of his lowercasing the word. I don't know if he will succeed in his aim to be the liberal churches' "go-to guy" on the subject of the Spirit, but this book can have no appeal to any evangelical with a serious interest in this important subject, especially when there are so many other fine books. The author's outspokenly liberal views on homosexuality and other issues should deter any reader who takes the Bible seriously.
  2. Monroe, NC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Something new for everyone
    July 31, 2012
    Modelk66
    Monroe, NC
    Age: 45-54
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    DISCLAIMER: I received an Advance Reader's Copy of the book Fresh Air by Jack Levison from Paraclete Press in exchange for a publicized review of the book.

    Regardless of your take on the Holy Spirit, this is one book that will challenge your thinking concerning the Holy Spirit. Levison presents a case for seeing the Holy Spirit from a different perspective. He presents a case for seeing the Holy Spirit in all of Scripture and not just in the New Testament or only in the events in the book of Acts. While his writing style is simple enough, the ideas and concepts he presents will take some time to digest. This is not a book to be used to enhance your speed-reading skills. In fact, you may find yourself rereading sentences just because you say to yourself "Did he really just say that?" Or "I've never seen that in that portion of Scripture before." You will need a bible open - or at least a bible program running on your computer - while you are reading this book to get his full intent and interpretation of Scripture. Most of his chapters end in either some discussion questions or takeaway points, making this a suitable resource for doing a group study on the Holy Spirit. Regardless of what you think or have been taught about the Holy Spirit, Fresh Air will cause you to breathe fresh air while you read it.
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