Forsaken: The Trinity, the Cross and Why It Matters  -     By: Thomas H. McCall
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Forsaken: The Trinity, the Cross and Why It Matters

IVP Academic / 2012 / Paperback

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"My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?"

How should a Christian interpret this passage? What implications does the cross have for the Trinitarian theology? Did the Father kill the Son?

In Forsaken: The Trinity, and the Cross, and Why it Matters Theologian Thomas McCall presents a Trinitarian reading of Christ's darkest moment--the moment of his prayer to his heavenly Father from the cross. McCall revisits the biblical texts and surveys the various interpretations of Jesus' cry, ranging from early church theologians to the Reformation to contemporary theologians.

Along the way, he explains the terms of the scholarly debate and clearly marks out what he believes to be the historically orthodox point of view. By approaching the Son's cry to the Father as an event in the life of the Triune God, Forsaken seeks to recover the true poignancy of the orthodox perspective on the cross.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 176
Vendor: IVP Academic
Publication Date: 2012
Dimensions: 8.25 X 5.50 (inches)
ISBN: 0830839585
ISBN-13: 9780830839582
Availability: In Stock

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Publisher's Description

"My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" How should a Christian interpret this passage? What implications does the cross have for the trinitarian theology? Did the Father kill the Son? Theologian Thomas McCall presents a trinitarian reading of Christ's darkest moment--the moment of his prayer to his heavenly Father from the cross. McCall revisits the biblical texts and surveys the various interpretations of Jesus' cry, ranging from early church theologians to the Reformation to contemporary theologians. Along the way, he explains the terms of the scholarly debate and clearly marks out what he believes to be the historically orthodox point of view. By approaching the Son's cry to the Father as an event in the life of the Triune God, Forsaken seeks to recover the true poignancy of the orthodox perspective on the cross.

Author Bio

Thomas H. McCall (Ph.D., Calvin Seminary) is associate professor of biblical and systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Ilinois. He is the author of (Eerdmans 2010) and co-editor (with Michael C. Rea) of (Oxford 2009).

Editorial Reviews

"This is a remarkable book. With marvelous clarity and economy, McCall takes us on a journey across a landscape of biblical, historical, philosophical and theological trails that thrills the mind, warms the heart and draws us into the life of God. This is a rare achievement worthy of manifold imitation."
"I like the way that Tom McCall does theology. He is a genuine trinitarian. The God that he sees revealed in the crucifixion of Jesus is totally and richly trinitarian, three persons who live in interpersonal, other-oriented holy love because the divine being that they in unicity share is itself that same other-oriented love. The incarnation, the crucifixion, the resurrection of Christ and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost are God's response to the creatures' determination to separate themselves from loving communion with their Maker. The trinitarian God wants his creatures to be in his life when they do not want him to be in theirs. So in Christ he entered into our separation to make it possible for us to be brought back into participation in his interpersonal life of love. As Paul said, this God is pro nobis! Only a trinitarian God could be that. Tom sees all of this. I found myself wanting joyously to worship. My prayer? 'Lord, let Tom give us more!'"
" Forsaken treats some deep topics in gospel teaching about God and the works of God with economy, clarity, analytical rigor and spiritual penetration. This is a compelling reflection on matters at the heart of Christian faith."
"By addressing the thorny question of how we speak well of God given Jesus' cry of dereliction, Thomas McCall's Forsaken offers not only a welcome but also an indispensable contribution to theology proper. He challenges much modern theology that sets God against God and implicitly or explicitly presents a broken Trinity that inclines toward a denial of essential Christian teachings such as God's simplicity and impassibility. He accomplishes this through a careful biblical and theological argument that is faithful to Scripture and trinitarian doctrine. Generously confronting this modern inclination, he persuasively demonstrates it is misguided and unnecessary. In the process he offers a beautiful and truthful doctrine of God worthy of the triune God Christians confess. Careful readers of this book will avoid tempting but misguided modern theological confusions."

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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Finally!
    August 27, 2012
    Rob
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book vindicates the thoughts and positions I have had on this topic. I have often found myself feeling alone in this world when it came to the interpretation of Jesus' cry of forsakenness. Finally someone who not only shares my thoughts but has written masterfully about it as well. I highly recommend this great book to all.
  2. Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Did God the Father kill Jesus on the cross?
    August 5, 2012
    Abram KJ
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"

    "Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you."

    "I and the Father are one."

    Wondering how these three verses of Scripture fit together? I often have. Cognitive dissonance finally got the better of me, and I decided I should try to think through this one a little more deeply. To that end I read Thomas H. McCall's Forsaken: The Trinity and the Cross, and Why It Matters. (Thanks to IVP for the free review copy, in exchange for an unbiased review.)

    First, the very short summary of my review, if you want to cut to the chase and head off and do something else after this next paragraph.

    McCall tackles some difficult questions: "Did God forsake Jesus [on the cross]? Did the Father turn his back on the Son in rage? Was the Trinity ruptured or broken on that day?" His answers and arguments are rooted in Scripture, the history of interpretation of that Scripture, and are consistently compelling. McCall really helped me through my own struggles to grasp some of these questions, leading me to a fuller understanding of the life of the Trinity and the relationship between its persons, particularly in terms of what happened on the cross. And he spells out the implications of his assertions beautifully. God is not divided, he concludes, but God--all of God--is for us. So we can rejoice and rest secure in that. Five stars, no doubt.

    McCall writes "not for other scholars...but for pastors, students and friends--indeed, for anyone genuinely interested in moving toward a deeper understanding of God's being and actions." Forsaken is heavy theological lifting for a non-scholar (and not lightweight for a scholar, either), but the effort is well worth it. McCall answers some very common questions people ask (or are scared to ask and should ask) about the Trinity, also showing ramifications for our relationship to God.

    Forsaken has four chapters. Each asks a theological question, addresses it, then concludes with some theological assertions to avoid, some to affirm, and why it matters.

    The first chapter asks, "Was the Trinity Broken?" Here McCall discusses the theological concept of "dereliction," or the idea that Jesus was abandoned by God on the cross. Recent theology notwithstanding, McCall makes a strong Scriptural case that God the Father did not forsake the Son on the Cross. Understanding Psalm 22 as an "interpretive key" to Jesus' death, McCall writes: "No, the only text of Scripture that we can understand to address this question directly, Psalm 22:24, says that the Father did not hide his face from his Son. To the contrary, he has 'listened to his cry for help.'"

    Not only that, the author argues, but if God truly had forsaken Jesus, why would Jesus bother--after his cry--to say, "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit"? Jesus "prefaces his last words with a sense of deep relational intimacy: Jesus addresses his 'Father.'"

    In chapter two McCall asks, "Just what are we to make of the biblical witness to the wrath of God? Is it opposed to his love? Is it a 'dark side' to God that is inconsistent with his holiness or with his mercy?" He makes a pretty hard-to-argue-with case that "the biblical witness does not set love and wrath in opposition to one another." McCall, I thought, was at his best in this chapter when he highlighted multiple New Testament references to wrath--not only the wrath of God generally, but Jesus' wrath specifically. So there's no Old Testament God=wrath, New Testament God=mercy conclusion to be drawn from the Bible. The author utilizes the theological categories of divine impassibility and simplicity to show that "wrath" as God exhibits it is not what we might envision in human anger; rather, it is an expression of holy love.

    McCall's third chapter asks whether God's divine foreknowledge means that God killed Jesus, since he knew it was going to happen, could have stopped it, but didn't. "God's plan was to use the death of Jesus for his purposes and for our good," but God himself did not cause the death. As Acts so often makes clear, McCall points out, "The apostolic proclamation of the gospel places the fault and blame on the sinners who are responsible for the death of Jesus."

    Chapter four articulates a robust theology of justification (forensic; instantaneous; by which I enter into the life of God) and sanctification (separation unto God; progressive; by which I grow in communion with God). Page 145 and following has a brilliant interpretation of Paul's famous Romans 7:14-25 passage where he (seemingly) wrestles with sin.

    One difficult implication of this book for me as a worship leader (and coach of worship leaders) is that, if McCall is right, we may be singing some not-quite-right theology in two well-known songs. "How Deep the Father's Love for Us" has a line that says, "The Father turns his face away." And the song "In Christ Alone" says, "...till on that cross, as Jesus died, the wrath of God was satisfied." McCall addresses these two claims head on and (in my opinion, successfully) refutes them. The Father did not turn his face away (as noted above). And to say that God the Son mollified the wrath of God the Father is to bifurcate the Trinity in some unorthodox ways. (!)

    I'm not sure if it's generally accepted for a book reviewer to admit to shedding tears when reading a review copy. (Objectivity! Right?) No matter. McCall's concluding postscript ("A Personal Theological Testimony") moved me to tears, as he recounted the difference "the trinitarian gospel" made for him and his family as they processed the death of his father.

    Getting the theological details of the Trinity right (as best we can!) matters. It matters for our understanding of God, our relationship with him, and for all of life. In the life and truths of the Trinity--properly understood, and I think McCall a good guide here--there is great comfort. We see a God who, as McCall says, is for us. We find a God who has granted us victory over sin and death, making it possible for us to enter into communion with the triune God of love.
  3. Chicago, IL
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent book!
    June 29, 2012
    KenR
    Chicago, IL
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Forsaken is an extremely good theological perspective on the Trinity. After being a Christian for 40 years, having studied for the ministry many yrs ago, this book is a breath of fresh air and an insight as to what was happening when Jesus was on the Cross. It answers the question, "Where was God when Jesus was hanging on the cross?" It is well written and a must have book for every pastor and minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
  4. Lisle, IL
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    The Trinity Matters
    March 22, 2012
    luv2readjen
    Lisle, IL
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I didn't necessarily intend to write a review of this book, but since it seems to be the way I read anything these days, I thought it made sense to submit my thoughts on this book. I consider myself an armchair theologian - I have no formal training, but I read the important works of many others who have done the hard work, and then I tie together the perspectives that seem most appropriate and cohesive. I have read books on the Holy Spirit, books on Jesus, and books on God, but in most instances their overall discussion of Trinitarian theology is somewhat ad hoc. The conclusion, for the most part, that I had recognized as the cornerstone of faith is that the Trinity is, but as a doctrine, it is only critical to the concept of monotheism - that is, the Trinity is because we cannot have Christianity with more than one God. Therefore, the three are one.

    What Thomas McCall does in Forsaken, and in a very few pages, is somewhat revolutionary, at least from my perspective. He starts with Jesus words on the cross, and from there, builds a portrait of the Trinity that necessarily belongs as the complete underpinning of Christian faith - not just a convenient box to put our deity in. Thomas McCall writes for someone like me - he takes the prevailing doctrinal positions related to Jesus on the cross, righteous wrath, holy love, propitiation, justification, and sanctification, and analyzes them in light of the Word. He makes points about what positions are untenable, and which hold true to the character and person of God.

    His writing style is such that a non-seminarian like me is able to confidently understand ‘divine impassability' and ‘divine aseity' along with other complex theological terms. These concepts are not newly asserted here, but they are packaged with an eye toward providing a context and fullness to the triune God.

    The book is one that should serve both as a resource for pastors and a delight for a thinking Christian who wants to understand more completely the nature and complexity of a God whose love for us was demonstrated on a cross, not made possible because of it. It is a beautiful and rich portrait of the Trinity whose gift of forgiveness to us precipitates the work of regeneration in us.
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